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Updated: 47 min 49 sec ago

Summer Schedule

3 hours 15 sec ago
div id=parent-fieldname-text class=plaindiv class=contentdiv class=contentdiv class=content p style=text-align: leftThe law library's summer schedule begins Monday, May 11th and remains in effect through Sunday, August 16th.  /p p style=text-align: leftbRegular Hours/b/p ul style=text-align: leftliMonday – Thursday: 8:00am – 9:00pm/liliFriday: 8:00am – 6:00pm/liliSaturday: 9:00am – 6:00pm/liliSunday: 1:00pm – 9:00pm /li/ul p style=text-align: leftbExceptions: /b/p ulliMonday, May 25: CLOSED (Memorial Day)/liliFriday - Saturday, July 3 - 4: CLOSED (Independence Day)/liliMonday, July 27 – Friday, July 31: 8:00am – 5:00pm/liliSaturday, August 1 – Sunday, August 2: CLOSED /liliMonday, August 3 – Friday, August 7: 8:00am – 5:00pm/liliSaturday, August 8 – Sunday, August 9: CLOSED/liliMonday, August 10 – Friday, August 14: 8:00am – 5:00pm/liliSaturday, August 15 – Sunday, August 16: CLOSED /li/ulPlease refer to thea href=/library/about/hours target=_blank Law Library Hours/a and a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.html target=_blankEkstrom Library Hours/a for more information.a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.htmlbr //a /div/div/div/div

Professor Giesel presents CLE program for Women Lawyers Association, LBA

4 hours 15 min ago
pOn May 7, Professor Grace Giesel will present “Recent Developments in Professional Responsibility,” to the Women Lawyers Association of Jefferson County. The 2-hour CLE program, for members of the practicing bar, will be held at the Downtown Bristol./ppEarlier this week, Professor Giesel presented the CLE program to the Louisville Bar Association. /ppAdditionally, Professor Giesel’s “Alternative Litigation Finance and the Attorney-Client Privilege” has been published by the Denver University Law Review. 92 Denver U.L.Rev.95 (2015). br //p

Harlan Scholar receives International Summer Research Award

8 hours 16 min ago
University of Louisville Junior Philip Moore has earned a 2015 Etscorn International Summer Research Scholarship. UofL awards the $5,000 Irvin F. and Alice S. Etscorn International Summer Research Award to promising undergraduates interested in conducting international research over the summer.br /br /Moore will spend the summer taking part in a study abroad program in Cuba at Universidad de San Gerónimo, a satellite campus of Universidad de La Habana. He will take classes aligned with his areas of study. He will also research how Cubans perceive their own economy and its potential for growth and use the research for his undergraduate honors thesis.br /br /quot;Three years ago, I would have never considered studying in Cuba and I am extremely thankful for the University of Louisville, which opened my mind to the global economy. This project will lead to critical understanding of Cuba’s outlook on its present and future state and I look forward to the opportunity,” Moore said.br /br /Moore is also a Harlan Scholar and a McConnell Scholar. br /br /He is due to graduate in May 2017 from UofL’s colleges of business and arts and sciences, majoring in economics, political science, Spanish and international business.br /br /Moore is a 2012 graduate of Louisville's Saint Xavier High School and is the son of Jennifer Moore. br /

U.S. District Judge David Hale to speak at Brandeis School of Law convocation

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 15:21
pUnited States District Judge David J. Hale, from the Western District of Kentucky, will be the speaker at Brandeis School of Law’s convocation on Saturday./ppJudge Hale agreed to speak to this year’s graduating class after the original speaker, Judge John G. Heyburn II, passed away last week following a battle with liver cancer./pp“We are so grateful that Judge Hale agreed to step in and speak after the loss of our original speaker, Judge Heyburn. Judge Hale is the newest appointment to the Western District Bench and is a wonderful person. All of us at Brandeis appreciate his willingness to be a part of this special day and we look forward to hearing him share his wisdom to our graduating students,” said Dean Susan Duncan./ppPresident Barack Obama nominated Judge Hale on June 19, 2014. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 3, 2014, and received his commission on December 10, 2014.  His chambers are in the Gene Snyder U.S. Courthouse in Louisville./ppImmediately prior to his appointment to the bench, Judge Hale served as United States Attorney for the Western District of Kentucky, from May 2010 to December 2014.  As the chief federal law enforcement officer for the district, he led an office of more than 80 professionals, including federal prosecutors, support and administrative staff. /ppDuring his tenure as U.S. Attorney, Hale emphasized a renewed collaboration between federal, state and local law enforcement, which resulted in new anti-violence initiatives; he prioritized national security, health care fraud and economic fraud prosecutions; he chaired a U.S. Attorney working group on service member and veterans support; he sponsored Kentucky’s first statewide prescription pill summit; and he sponsored a new statewide health care fraud task force./ppJudge Hale practiced law in Louisville for more than 20 years.  He started as a litigation associate at Brown, Todd amp; Heyburn (now Frost Brown Todd) in 1992, before moving to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 1995, to serve as an Assistant U.S. Attorney.  He returned to private practice in 1999 with the firm of Reed Weitkamp Schell amp; Vice, where he practiced commercial litigation until his appointment as U.S. Attorney in 2010./ppWhile in private practice, Judge Hale served on the boards of the Louisville Urban League, Kentucky Educational Television (KET), and the Kentucky YMCA Youth Association./ppJudge Hale is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and the University of Kentucky College of Law.  His wife, Ann, is a registered nurse, his daughter Caroline a college sophomore, and his son John David, a high school senior. /p

University of Louisville Law Review to Accept Applications for Membership

Mon, 05/04/2015 - 10:17
pThe University of Louisville Law Review will soon begin accepting applications for membership from rising 2Ls and 3Ls.  The University of Louisville Law Review is the principal publication at the University of Louisville, Brandeis School of Law. The Law Review has recently achieved the highest ranking in its history, placing in the top 18% of all ranked U.S. journals. This success is a direct result of the hard work and dedication of the Law Review’s student members. We hope that you apply for the opportunity to contribute to our mission of impactful scholarship. /ppMembers can expect to attain academic credit, an opportunity to complete the Law School’s writing requirement, and a chance to obtain marketable skills and academic distinction sought by employers. /ppApplications will be released on May 1, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. Upon release, interested students may take a physical copy of the Volume 54 Membership Application, a stack of which will be located outside the Law Review Office (Room 238), or may access an electronic copy on TWEN. To access the Volume 54 Membership Application on TWEN, go under the tab “Add Course” and sign up for the course titled “Law Review 2015-2016.” Under the “Navigation” box, click on the “Assignment Drop Box,” and then click on “Membership Application, Vol. 54.” You will find copies of the Volume 54 Membership Application and the grade release form under “Attached Files.” /ppAll applicants must also submit a completed physical copy of the grade release form to the marked manila folder outside of the Law Review Office.  To be considered for membership, students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 at the conclusion of the Spring 2015 Semester. The grade release form can be submitted with the application or any time prior.  /ppAll application materials will be due by 11:59p.m. on Sunday, May 17. Applicants will be informed of membership decisions on May 24. If you have any questions about the application process, please contact Emily Irwin at a href=mailto:ebirwi01@louisville.eduebirwi01@louisville.edu/a.  /p

Employee Spotlight: Bailey Schrupp

Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:36
p align=centerimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/profile-baileyschrupp.jpg / /ppnbsp;/pp align=centeriCongratulations to Bailey who graduates this Saturday, May 9th! Kudos also to two other law library student workers graduating this weekend: Michael VanSickle and Alex Russell! We wish you each the best in all your endeavours./i/ppNext up is rising quot;Fightin' 3Lquot; bBailey Schrupp/b. She's the President of the Environmental Law amp; Land Use Society and Notes Editor of the a href=/students/jaeliJournal of Animal and Environmental Law/i/a . In addition to working in the law library, Bailey's got a busy summer ahead serving as the Donan Energy Law Fellow and volunteering as a Coordinator for the Jefferson County Teen Court Program.  /ppbWhat’s your hometown? /b/ppiRadcliff, Kentucky/i/ppbWhere did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?/b/ppiCampbellsville University, Political Science major and History minor  /i/ppbWhat led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?/b/ppiI either want to go on to get my masters of Library Science and become a law librarian or I want to get my LLM in Environmental Law and then work for the State or Federal Goverment doing environmental work. /i/ppbWhat do you enjoy about working in the law library? /b/ppiThe books! I am history nerd so any time I get to shelve older treatises downstairs I end up reading them. /i/ppbWhat’s your favorite book?/b/ppiIt would be impossible to pick one, but my favorites are The Harry Potter series, The Great Gatsby, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Angels amp; Demons by Dan Brown. I also liked , quot;I am Malalaquot; by Malala Yousafzai./i  /ppbDo you have a favorite quote?/b/ppiquot;Why, sometimes I've believed six impossible things before breakfastquot;. ~Alice in Wonderland /i/ppbIf you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?/b/ppiIf we are talking historical figures I would say JFK or Jackie Kennedy. If not then it would have to be Reese Witherspoon or Emma Watson.  /i/ppbDo you have any pets? /b/ppiI have a toy poodle named Choco and two cats, Kelsey and Leonardo Da Vinci (we call him Leo though)./ibr / /ppnbsp;/ppnbsp;/pp b/b/p

How to Connect from Home

Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:35
pSome of the library's a href=/library/e-journalselectronic journals and databases/a are restricted to campus use only. However, many of the law school's digital collections and the a href=http://louisville.edu/library/University of Louisville Libraries' resources/a may be accessed remotely from your home computer or mobile device. /ppVisit the a href=/librarylibrary's website/a and click a href=https://login.echo.louisville.edu/loginquot;Connect from Homequot;/a. On the next page, enter your ULink ID and password. Contact a librarian if you’d like assistance. /pp align=centera href=/libraryimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/connectfromhome.jpg //a /ppFor more tips like these, visit the a href=/library/facultynewsLaw Library News for Faculty Archives/a.  /p

Reduced Library Hours During the Break

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:58
div class=content div class=content pThe law library will close at 5PM on Friday, May 1. It will also be closed May 2-3 (Derby Weekend) and May 9-10 (Graduation Weekend). It will be open from 8AM-5PM Monday thru Friday, May 4-8. The law library will begin its Summer schedule on Monday, May 11.   /pbr /pPlease refer to thea href=/library/about/hours target=_blank Law Library Hours/a and a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.html target=_blankEkstrom Library Hours/a for more information.a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.htmlbr //a/p /div /div

Louisville Law Review receives its highest national ranking ever

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:09
pWashington and Lee School of Law released its law review rankings for 2014, which included a 6-percent jump in the rankings for the University of Louisville Law Review. Among ranked U.S. journals, the Louisville Law Review now ranks in the top 18 percent nationwide, up from the top 24 percent just one year ago.br / br /With these scores, the Louisville Law Review has obtained its highest position ever and now has the distinction of having the top law review in Kentucky as it pertains to the categories of cites per cost and citations from journal articles. br /bbr /Implementing a ‘culture of success’/bbr /br /Editor-in-Chief Daniel Reed attributes the rise in rankings to a “cumulative effect of content published over an 8-year period.” br /br /He specifically cites the efforts of editors-in-chief Mike Swansburg (Volume 48), Tommy Sturgeon (Volume 49), Elizabeth Fitzpatrick (Volume 50), Eddie O’Brien (Volume 51) and Benjamin Hardy (Volume 52). br /br /“Before their tenures, the Law Review was in pretty bad shape. Several specifics come to mind to help turn things around. The number of issues published per year was cut from 4 to 3. However, the amount of content stayed the same. This allowed for a decrease in our printing costs. This coupled with a more targeted approach to the budget allowed the law review to become financially self-sustaining, creating more flexibility for the organization,” Reed said. br /br /Additionally, editing efficiency became more of a priority. For example, the Law Review's Editing Submission Sheet (ESS), a standardized editing form, was created by a past Editorial Board, resulting in the Law Review being recognized for best practices and innovation in editing at the 2013 NCLR.br /br /The Law Review also began taking a more targeted approach to article selection, Reed said, calling this one of the most important changes that allowed for an increase in rankings. br /br /“The creation of an Article Selection Editor position on the board allowed for a person to be committed entirely to finding quality content. Second, the law review began to focus on factors likely to reflect in the rankings, including the author's credentials and past publication and citation history. Overall, the process was revamped to ensure that the law review was receiving content of the highest quality from well cited authors,” he said. br /br /Finally, Reed notes that the Law Review used to publish pieces from the Annual Warns-Render Institute, but it fell out of publication at one point. It was reinstated in Volume 50 and has since been one of the most well-cited issues each year. br /br /“Aside from the practical changes, I think these past boards have implemented a culture of success for our organization. By creating conditions that allow the Law Review to thrive, members can be proud of what we are able to accomplish,” Reed said. “Students, faculty, and alumni have a greater respect for law review than ever before. This helps us not only to continually attain top students but it makes our members more willing to put forth a dedicated effort in the interest of furthering the Law Review's mission of impactful scholarship.”br /br /bBanner year/bbr /br /It’s been a banner year for the Louisville Law Review and its members. Louisville played host to the 61st annual National Conference of Law Reviews in March. This marked the first time UofL hosted the event since 1986.br /br /The University of Louisville Law Review also began putting more focus on its digital presence. Reed and Andrew Weeks, online content editor, are on a mission to step up the Law Review’s online presence with more activity on its website, as well as through its Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn channels. The objective is to keep up with the times and to gain more exposure using tips learned at the NCLR event.  /ppbRankings and scores/b/ppHere is a look at the Louisville Law Review’s overall rankings among ranked U.S. journals from 2004-2014, including its scores from this year. /ppb2014 Categories, Ranking, Top, Score /b/ppOverall Ranking: 178/986, 18.1%, 14.5br /Impact: 193/986, 19.5%, 0.72br /Citations from Journal Articles: 175/986,17.7%, 660br /Currency Factor: 192/986, 19.4%, 1.17br /Citation of Articles in Cases: 321/986, 32.6%, 7br /Cost: 172/986, 17.4%, 2.35/ppbOverall Rankings/bbr /bYear, Ranking, Top, Score/bbr /2014: 178/986 18.1% 14.5br /2013: 241/987 24.4% 13.5br /2012: 318/967 32.9% 9.8br /2011: 294/966 30.4% 9.6br /2010: 275/972 28.3% 10.4br /2009: 258/933 27.7% 11.4br /2008: 256/901 28.4% 10.9br /2007: 234/800 29.3% 12br /2006: 277/760 36.4% 9.7br /2005: 244/699 34.9% 9.5br /2004: 288/703 41.0% 9.9/ppnbsp;/p

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:49
Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at a href=mailto:karen.jordan@louisville.edukaren.jordan@louisville.edu/a.

Academic Credit for Summer Fall Externships

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:43
Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.br /br /The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:39
Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

UofL E-mail Account Info for Graduating Students

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 12:27
p If you're graduating in May or August, and not otherwise enrolled for other Fall 2015 classes, your UofL e-mail account (CardMail) will remain active until October, according to University IT's a href=http://louisville.edu/it/policies/opening-and-closing-accounts target=_blankinformation about opening and closing accounts/a. /p p However, if you would like to keep your UofL e-mail iaddress/i forever, you may register for the University Alumni Association's ba href=http://www.uoflalumni.org/s/1157/site2014/index.aspx?sid=1157amp;gid=1amp;pgid=502 target=_blankE-mail for Life/a/b. This is not a true e-mail account, but a forwarding service: Messages sent to iyouraddress@louisville.edu/i will be forwarded to the third-party e-mail account of your choosing, such as Gmail, Yahoo or any other personal or business e-mail account. /p

Professor Cross invited to present research to ATRIP's Annual Congress in South Africa

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 11:37
!--[if gte mso 9]xml o:OfficeDocumentSettings o:AllowPNG/ /o:OfficeDocumentSettings /xml![endif]-- p class=MsoNormalProfessor John Cross has been invited to present the results of one of his research projects at the Annual Congress of the Association of Teachers and Researchers of Intellectual Property (ATRIP). /pp class=MsoNormalThe Congress, which will take place in Cape Town, South Africa, in late September of this year, brings together intellectual property scholars from around the world. /pp class=MsoNormalProfessor Cross’s research project deals with the use of unfair competition and unfair trade practices laws to deal with questions of intellectual property infringement. 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Unclaimed Lost Found Items

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 09:52
Unclaimed quot;Lost and Found Itemsquot; are now available and located on the table outside Room 275 on April 30 and May 1.

U.S. District Court Judge Heyburn passes away after cancer battle

Thu, 04/30/2015 - 08:42
pUnited States District Court Judge John G. Heyburn II has passed away at the age of 66 following a battle with liver cancer. /ppJohn Heyburn grew up in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1970 he received his A.B. from Harvard University where he majored in history and received seven varsity letters in cross country and track, and completed three Boston Marathons. In 1976, he received his J.D. from the University of Kentucky, where he was a member of the National Moot Court team. /ppFrom 1976 until his appointment to the bench, Judge Heyburn was associated with the law firm of Brown, Todd amp; Heyburn (now Frost Brown Todd). He was a partner at the firm from 1982 to 1992. Judge Heyburn also served as special counsel to then Jefferson County Judge Executive Mitch McConnell and was active in civic and political affairs in  Kentucky./pp He was a delegate to the 1984 and 1988 Republican National Convention. In March, 1992, President Bush nominated Judge Heyburn to the United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky. The United States Senate confirmed his appointment in August, 1992. From 2001 to 2008, Judge Heyburn served as Chief Judge of the Western District of Kentucky./ppJudge Heyburn presided over many noteworthy cases during his time on the bench. Two of those cases have reached the United States Supreme Court: in 2007 the Supreme Court considered the appeal arising from Judge Heyburn’s opinion in the Jefferson County School assignment case; and in 2014 the Court granted certiorari in two gay marriage cases which originated from opinions by Judge Heyburn. /pp class=MsoPlainTextHis ruling in the latter case is what led to the landmark same-sex marriage case to appear before SCOTUS earlier this week. The outcome of that case is expected in late June./pp class=MsoPlainTextAlthough not a Brandeis alum Judge Heyburn had many connections to the law school. He was previously scheduled to be this year's commencement speaker, selected by the student body. Caroline Pieroni, a 2009 Brandeis graduate, served as his clerk. And, according to Dean Susan Duncan, Judge Heyburn also mentored many Brandeis students and graduates and was a quot;friend of the school.quot;/pp class=MsoPlainTextquot;During his long tenure, Judge Heyburn has been a pioneer for justice and issued manyspan /spangroundbreaking decisions on a wide variety of important topics.span /spanHe will be greatly missed in our legal community as he was a model attorney, highly respected jurist, and a civic leader,quot; Dean Duncan said. quot;span/spanOn behalf of the entire Brandeis community, we express our deepest sympathy to his family and hope their many wonderful memories will sustain them during this difficult time.quot;span /span/ppnbsp;/ppnbsp;/p

Nearby Road Closures for Oaks Derby

Wed, 04/29/2015 - 11:51
pMany a href=https://louisvilleky.gov/government/police/kentucky-oaks-derby-street-closures-and-no-parking-areasstreets near Belknap Campus will be closed/a for the Kentucky Oaks on Friday, May 1, and the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, May 2. /ppThe law library will be open from 7AM to 5 PM Friday and will be closed this weekend. On Derby and Oaks days, a href=http://ridetarc.org/InternalOneColumn.aspx?id=1690TARC/a service will be available at the regularly scheduled times on all routes for the usual fare.  /p

Brandeis professors share words of wisdom to ’15 graduates

Tue, 04/28/2015 - 10:51
pThere’s a reason inspirational quotes are so popular on Pinterest and motivational posters are plastered on boardroom walls across the country: People want to be encouraged, particularly when they’re transitioning into the Big Unknown. /ppFor this reason, we’ve asked some of Brandeis School of Law’s professors to offer up their favorite words of advice to this year’s graduates:/pp“Remember that your first job is not your last job.  You are building a career and you will have many opportunities to begin new adventures. Try to be open to many possibilities. One day you will look around and find yourself in the midst of a meaningful and rewarding career; one that you might never have anticipated,” ib- Enid Trucios-Haynes/b/ibr /br /“Follow the advice of Louis Brandeis:/polliKeep your life balanced. ‘I soon learned I could do 12 months work in 11 months, but not in 12.’/liliAnd be sure to have the facts before judging. ‘Knowledge is essential to understanding, and understanding should precede judging.’”i b- Laura Rothstein /b/i/li/olp“Where you start out does not determine how high you can fly! Anything is possible through hard work, dedication, and determination.” bi- Laura McNeal /i/b/pp“Decide now what you won't do for money or reputation -- the ethical lines you won't cross just in order to keep a job or save face. You will face many temptations and grey areas in practice, and they will be easier to face if you start your career with a clear picture of your moral code or a strong sense of the integrity of your character that you just won't compromise.”i b- Tony Arnold/b/ibr /br /“Advice 1, (A joke from all my classes): ‘If the legal profession ever becomes overwhelming and you just can't decide on a course of action, ask yourself WWMDD, 'What would Matt Damon do' and the universe will give you the answer you need.’/ppquot;Advice 2 (A serious one): ‘Internalize the implications of legal representation if you go on to only represent people who look like you, live near you, worship with you, and think like you; entire communities would be left without adequate legal representation from our talented Brandeis alumni.  You are leaving law school with incredibly powerful tools to give voice to individuals, issues, and communities.  Use those tools in your career to let new voices be heard and new issues be identified.’”i b- Jamie Abrams/b/i/pp“Don’t worry about making mistakes — everybody makes them. But ask questions and pay attention to detail and you will make fewer of them,”b i- Rick Nowka /i/b/pp class=MsoNormalquot;Always remember that the highest calling of a lawyer is her role as public citizen: To be engaged in the community, the profession, and in all the institutions of society that make the world a better place.quot; bi- Cedric Merlin Powell /i/b/pp “A few things to keep in mind:/polliHave confidence in yourself;/liliAlways remember who you are;/liliKeep in mind all life’s lessons you have learned along the way;/liliDo not forget how to recognize right from wrong and keep in mind that sometimes it is hard to see the difference; /liliThere will be a few bad days but just remember that your family and your pets will love you, no matter what; /liliAnd, finally, find your passion and pursue it.   /li/olpbi-    Grace M. Giesel /i/bbr /    br /quot;Get whatever job you can, but make it the job that you want.quot; bi- Lisa H. Nicholson/i/b/pp“Never earn so much money that you don’t have the time to spend it.”bi- John Cross/i/b/p“Practice the type of law that interests you, and you will have a rewarding career. And, assume the version of the document you are working on is the version that is going to the client.”bi - Lars Smith /i/bbr /pbr /“A piece of advice that someone once gave my husband and that we both believe strongly in:  ‘You should do two things on the first day at a new job: One, befriend your boss’s administrative assistant. Two, start looking for a new job.’/ppbr /“Networking is as important as billable work. Be sure to make time to socialize with others and always be friendly and polite to all./pp“Your writing makes an initial impression in the same way your appearance does when meeting someone for the first time.  Make sure everything you write is well-organized and spend time to proofread./ppquot;Your first job is where you will make your mistakes, so have a long-term plan to go elsewhere.  Your jobs after the first are where you will use what you learned from your mistakes to excel.”br /bi- Ariana Levinson /i/bbr /br /“If you become business lawyers, view your clients as long term business partners, not as one-off billing opportunities. For new businesses, bill low and slow. And, most importantly, learn how their business works and on your own time. If their companies are important to you, you will be important to them.”bi - Manning Warren /i/bbr /br /“What I would tell law students is to believe in themselves, always work hard and be prepared, live your life in gratitude, treat everyone with respect, and make sure you serve others all along the way.  If you are thankful, positive, and help others your life will feel fulfilled more so than if you make lots of money or have some type of status. /pp“My dad also told me two things over and over that stick with me.  The first was he never regretted anything he tried but sometimes regretted not trying. He also told me that ‘to whom much is given, much is expected.’ He reinforced how privileged I was to grow up in this country at this time and how a law degree was a privilege and not a right. He made sure I knew to use that degree for the good of others not just myself and never to become too impressed with myself.  Finally, I really like this prayer I heard from Father Hesburgh at Notre Dame: ‘O God, to those who have hunger, give bread; and to us who have bread, give the hunger for justice.’ I think that has a special meaning for lawyers who can help bring justice.”br /ib-  Dean Susan Duncan/bbr //i/p

Brandeis Law students recognized for outstanding achievement

Mon, 04/27/2015 - 13:09
pA number of Brandeis School of Law students were recognized last week for their leadership efforts and outstanding accomplishments during a ceremony held at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium./ppAccording to Jennifer DiSanza, Assistant Dean for Student Life, the event is held specifically to honor students for their achievements, as well as to recognize the support of practicing attorneys and law faculty who volunteer to help students in moot court and mock trial competitions./ppbAcademic Awards/bbr /Recipients of the first-in-class awards, which recognize those ranked No. 1 in their class, include Andrea N. Aikin, Megan E. Diffenderfer and Andrew T. Hagerman./ppDiffenderfer also received the L. LeRoy Highbaugh, Sr. Law Award, presented to students with the highest overall grades in property./ppJaclyn H. Elliott received the Marilyn Meredith Memorial Book Award, presented to the top female law student in the 1L part-time program./ppJoshua A.J. Collins received the Professional Responsibility Award, presented to the student with the highest grade in Professional Responsibility./ppCarolyn Y. Purcell received the Leon Seidman Memorial Award for the highest grade in Legal Ethics/Professional Responsibility./ppReceiving the William Marshall Bullitt Memorial Awards for the most outstanding performance in constitutional law were Annie L. Malka and Ryan D. Nafziger. /ppJanet A. Lewis won the 2014 KBA Annual Student Writing Competition for her article on “The First Amendment and Social Media: Primary Students’ Constitutional Rights to Freely Speak Outside of the School.” /ppThe Samuel L. Greenebaum Awards for Achievement in Legal Writing went to Daniel C. Braun, Megan E. Diffenderfer, Megan E. Gibson, Carolyn Y. Purcell and Aaron P. Riggs./ppAida Almsalkhi received the Edward M. Post Award, going to a 2L student who demonstrates promise of excellence in litigation. /ppThe International Academy of Trial Lawyers Award went to Corey B. Shiffman./ppSarah D. Reddick earned the Outstanding Graduating Senior Award./ppThe Kentucky Defense Counsel Award went to Aaron P. Riggs. /ppThe Kentucky District Judges’ Association Award went to Kevin W. Boswell. /ppMegan Diffenderfer received the ABA-BNA Award for Excellence in Intellectual Property Law. /ppFinally, the Andrew Young Memorial Award, recognizing a student who excels in writing, went to Philip R. Heleringer. /ppThis year’s bTop Clinic Advocates/b include: br /Andrea N. Aikenbr /Jenna T. Bradybr /Paige L. Clarkbr /Patrick E. Markeybr /Jennifer R. Pencebr /Corey B. Shiffmanbr /br /bLeadership and Achievement Awards/bbr /The following students were recognized for their leadership and achievement: Andrea N. Aiken, Joshua A.J. Collins, Christine A. Shannon and J. Ben Shepard received the Robert C. Jayes Memorial Awards for demonstrating academic merit, communication skills and leadership qualities./ppKevin W. Boswell and Leah A. Gravius received the Omicron Delta Kappa Award./ppJennifer R. Pence received the National Association of Women Lawyers Outstanding Law Student Award. /ppJanet A. Lewis received the Louisville Bar Association Legal Opportunity Scholarship. br /br /bBrandeis Inn of Court Members/b were also named and include: br /    Sana Abhari             br /    Kevin W. Boswellbr /    Kellie R. Davisbr /    Leah A. Gravius     br /    Christopher J. Groeschen     br /    Hayleigh J. Hurtbr /    Tara Adkins McGuirebr /    K. Shay Owensbr /    Miranda S. Ratcliffebr /    Sarah D. Reddick  br /    J. Ben Shepardbr /    Corey B. Shiffmanbr /br /bBrandeis Honor Society/b members announced include: br /    Andrea N. Aikinbr /    Paul A. Casi IIIbr /    Matthew R. Dawsonbr /    Emily A. DeVuono     br /    Leah A. Gravius          br /    Sarah E. Hackmanbr /    Mary Catherine Halloranbr /    Jessica A. Hazelwoodbr /    Philip R. Heleringer br /    Annie L. Malkabr /    Tara Adkins McGuirebr /    Deanna M. Mulhallbr /    J. Ben Shepardbr /    Jordan M. Whitebr /    Dwight D. Youngbr /br /Recipients of bPublic Service Awards and Fellowships /binclude: br /br /The Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Award went to Kathryn A. Cross. br /br /The Samuel L. Greenebaum Fellowship went to John Paul Boitnott, Kevin W. Boswell, Meghan C. Burns, and C. Wesley Pagles. br /    br /Jennifer R. Pence received the Ellen B. Ewing Fellowship. br /br /Amanda R. Birman received the BarBri Fellows. br /br /Recipients of the IOLTA Fellowships include Carolyn A. Allen, Cheyla C. Bush, Matthew R. Dawson, Tyler A. Larson, Eric T. Proctor, Benjamin D.B. Siegel, and Steven D. Thompson. br /br /The Central High School Partnership Outstanding Students include David D. Cutt and David B. Lackford. br /br /Students who served as Program Coordinators or Academic Fellows in the Brandeis Academic Fellow Program this year include Eric T. Proctor and Sarah D. Reddick (program coordinators), and Rachel A. Ainsworth, Lindsey J. Boyd, Sunnye J. Bush-Sawtelle, David D. Cutt, Kari L. DiCecco, Emily B. Irwin, Emily A. Landherr, Caitlin L. McQueen, Emily E. Meyer, and Priscilla C. Page (academic fellows)./ppThe a href=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/Awards_2015.pdffull list of awards and recognitions is available online/a.  /p