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Law Library Fall Hours

Fri, 08/15/2014 - 12:14
div class=content pThe Law Library's Fall semester schedule begins Monday, August 18. The library will generally be open from 8 AM to 11 PM Monday's thru Thursday's, 8 AM to 6 PM on Friday's, 9 AM to 6 PM on Saturday's and 1 PM to 11 PM on Sunday's.  /p ul type=discli class=MsoNormala href=/library/about/hoursLaw Library Hours/a/lili class=MsoNormala href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.htmlEkstrom Library Hours /a/li/ul /div

Professor Trucios-Haynes Appointed as Director of the Muhammad Ali Institute for Peace and Justice

Sat, 07/19/2014 - 15:20
pProfessor Enid Trucios-Haynes has been appointed as Director of the Muhammad Ali Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of Louisville. According to the institute’s mission statement, it advances the work, study and practice of peacebuilding, social justice and violence prevention through the development of innovative educational programs, training, service and research. /pp“I am committed to the values of the MAI [Muhammad Ali Institute] relating to the promotion of peace and social justice. The MAI focuses on initiatives that support human dignity, foster responsible citizenship, further peace and justice and address the impact of violence in local, state, national and international arenas,” said Professor Trucios-Haynes, who, in addition to her new director’s role, also serves on the Metro Louisville Ethics Commission, as Vice Chair of the board of the ACLU of Kentucky and on its Executive and Litigation Review Committees, and directs an Immigration Externship at the Brandeis School of Law.  “My longstanding work around the social justice issues in immigration law and policy, as well as international human rights law is clearly related to the mission of the [institute]. The opportunity for collaboration with the Ali Institute is particularly exciting.”/ppOne attractive aspect regarding her work for the Ali Institute, said Professor Trucios-Haynes, is gaining the ability to witness and assist the work of Ali Scholars, whom she called “future leaders in their communities.” In the Ali Scholars Program, the students, among their other duties, are expected to select an expert area related to peace or social justice on which to focus, conduct research on a topic related to his or her expert area, and, finally, design and implement a local, national or international project related to his or her expert area. Part of the program also includes a biannual international trip that helps provide the scholars a global perspective on the lessons learned and matters emphasized during the program; this year, nine UofL students in the Ali Scholars Program visited Rwanda, a country only two decades removed from the genocide that occurred within its borders./ppWith so many great features, staff, and students already, what’s potentially next for the Ali Institute under the direction of Professor Trucios-Haynes?/pp“I hope to expand the presence of the MAI in the university and local community by focusing on local, national and international impact of violence affecting teens,” she said. “I plan to reinvigorate the faculty resource group to work on research projects related to the impact of violence on teens in our local community. At the national level, I hope the MAI can investigate the issues relating to the violence in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador that has led to the humanitarian crisis of the large scale migration of unaccompanied children and families to the United States.” /p

Volunteers Transform Law School Courtyards

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:14
p class=p1Check out the transformation that has taken place in the Law School courtyards, to be named the Charles Hebel, Jr., and Carol Hebel Courtyards. The Law School community has turned these previously unused and unattractive spaces into environmentally, humanly, and socially sustainable spaces with (mostly) native landscaping and places to relax and enjoy nature. The landscaping and planting work is done, and in the coming weeks, the courtyards will be power-washed and outdoor furniture will be installed. The soil around the pin oak in the west courtyard will be decompacted later this fall, and eventually hostas will be added around it.  A huge thanks to our donors, Charles Hebel, Jr., a 1955 graduate of the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, his wife Carol Hebel, and his son Charles Hebel, III, as well as to two University departments – Physical Plant and Communications/Media – which provided major ongoing support for this project. And a huge thanks to all of the members of the Law School community who were involved in conceiving the project, designing the plans, and doing the hard work of preparing the soils, transporting the plants to the law school, and planting the plants. The three dozen volunteers – students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends (including from other academic units) – who worked on the project during the past three weeks include:/p p class=p1Les Abramson/p p class=p1Tony Arnold/p p class=p1Angela Beverly/p p class=p1Ross Bradley/p p class=p1Scott Campbell/p p class=p1Alexandra Chase/p p class=p1Susan Duncan/p p class=p1Jen Ewa/p p class=p1Linda Ewald/p p class=p1Ryan Fenwick/p p class=p1Judy Fischer/p p class=p1Jacob Giesecke/p p class=p1Grace Giesel/p p class=p1James Giesel/p p class=p1Brandon Johnson/p p class=p1Mr. amp; Mrs. Jeremy Kirkham/p p class=p1Emily Kosse/p p class=p1Maria Kosse/p p class=p1Eric Matthews/p p class=p1Matt McClinton/p p class=p1Tyler Miller/p p class=p1Jon-Paul Moody/p p class=p1Ella Neely/p p class=p1Rick Nowka/p p class=p1Mickey Paul/p p class=p1Debra Reh/p p class=p1Laura Rothstein/p p class=p1Eunice Salazar/p p class=p1Shelley Santry/p p class=p1Bailey Schrupp/p p class=p1Chris Schulz/p p class=p1Allison Frakes Smith/p p class=p1Virginia Smith/p p class=p1Michael Van Sickle/p p class=p1Becky Wimberg/pp class=p1nbsp;/p p class=p1a href=http://www.whas11.com/community/Group-of-volunteers-work-to-change-landscape-at-UofLs-Law-school-266634091.htmlThe project was featured on WHAS11/a and a href=http://louisville.edu/uofltoday/campus-news/volunteers-sprucing-up-law-school-courtyardsUofL Today/a as an example of a volunteers giving back to the community./pp class=p1Come, hang out, and enjoy!/p

Check Out the Transformed Courtyards!

Mon, 07/14/2014 - 07:36
pCheck out the transformation that has taken place in the Law School courtyards, to be named the Charles Hebel, Jr., and Carol Hebel Courtyards.  The Law School community has turned these previously unused and unattractive spaces into environmentally, humanly, and socially sustainable spaces with (mostly) native landscaping and places to relax and enjoy nature.  The landscaping and planting work is done, and in the coming weeks, the courtyards will be power-washed and outdoor furniture will be installed.  The soil around the pin oak in the west courtyard will be decompacted later this fall, and eventually hostas will be added around it.  A huge thanks to our donors, Charles Hebel, Jr., a 1955 graduate of the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law, his wife Carol Hebel, and his son Charles Hebel, III, as well as to two University departments – Physical Plant and Communications/Media – which provided major ongoing support for this project.  And a huge thanks to all of the members of the Law School community who were involved in conceiving the project, designing the plans, and doing the hard work of preparing the soils, transporting the plants to the law school, and planting the plants.  The three dozen volunteers – students, alumni, faculty, staff, and friends (including from other academic units) – who worked on the project during the past three weeks include:/ppLes Abramsonbr /Tony Arnoldbr /Angela Beverlybr /Ross Bradleybr /Scott Campbellbr /Alexandra Chasebr /Susan Duncanbr /Jen Ewabr /Linda Ewaldbr /Ryan Fenwickbr /Judy Fischerbr /Jacob Gieseckebr /Grace Gieselbr /James Gieselbr /Brandon Johnsonbr /Mr. amp; Mrs. Jeremy Kirkhambr /Emily Kossebr /Maria Kossebr /Eric Matthewsbr /Matt McClintonbr /Tyler Millerbr /Jon-Paul Moodybr /Ella Neelybr /Rick Nowkabr /Mickey Paulbr /Debra Rehbr /Laura Rothsteinbr /Eunice Salazarbr /Shelley Santrybr /Bailey Schruppbr /Chris Schulzbr /Allison Frakes Smithbr /Virginia Smithbr /Michael Van Sicklebr /Becky Wimberg/ppThe project was featured on WHAS11 as an example of a volunteers giving back to the community: a href=http://www.whas11.com/community/Group-of-volunteers-work-to-change-landscape-at-UofLs-Law-school-266634091.htmlhttp://www.whas11.com/community/Group-of-volunteers-work-to-change-landscape-at-UofLs-Law-school-266634091.html/a.  Come, hang out, and enjoy!/p

Help Needed for Law Scool Courtyards Planting

Tue, 07/08/2014 - 11:37
span style=font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small /spanpspan style=color: black; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; font-size: 10ptThe Law School is seeking students, faculty, staff, and alums to help with planting about 300 new plants and flowers in the Law School courtyards, July 9-12 in the mornings (8:30-Noon).  uOur greatest need is for volunteers in the morning of Thursday, July 10./u  If you can help, please email Professor Tony Arnold, a href=mailto:tony.arnold@louisville.eduuspan style=color: #0000fftony.arnold@louisville.edu/span/u/a, or student Jen Ewa, a href=mailto:jennifer.ewa@gmail.comuspan style=color: #0000ffjennifer.ewa@gmail.com/span/u/a, or just show up at the courtyards.  Thank you for your help in transforming our courtyards into beautiful, environmentally sustainable, community gathering spaces that can be well utilized by our entire Law School community./span/pspan style=font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small /span

Courtyards Preparation and Planting: Alumni, Students, Staff, and Faculty Help Needed with Law School

Wed, 06/25/2014 - 10:14
pThe Law School needs the help of as many alumni, students, staff, and faculty as possible to prepare the Law School courtyards for transformation to beautiful native landscaped spaces and functional gathering/community spaces.  We need LOTS of people to help with preparing the land and soils, transporting plants and flowers (several pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans are ideal), and planting.  We have estimated that this community-building project will take more than 100 person-hours of work.  The days and times for work on the courtyards are:/ppPrep Work (this is important work – we need plenty of people willing to lend a hand):br /   Thursday, June 26: morning, afternoon, and eveningbr /   Friday, June 27: morningbr /   Saturday, June 28: morning and afternoonbr /   Sunday, June 29: afternoon and evening/ppTransporting Plants (part of a caravan – need lots of trucks, vans, SUVs, etc.):br /Either Monday, July 7 or Tuesday, July 8 (timing depends on who is available and when the nurseries are open)/ppPlanting:br /   Wednesday, July 9: morning, afternoon, and eveningbr /   Thursday, July 10: morning, afternoon, and eveningbr /   Friday, July 11: morningbr /   Saturday, July 12: morning and afternoon/ppIf you can help at all, please contact Professor Tony Arnold at a href=mailto:tony.arnold@louisville.edutony.arnold@louisville.edu/a or Jen Ewa at a href=mailto:jennifer.ewa@gmail.comjennifer.ewa@gmail.com/a or (708) 307-4123.  The project is supervised by Jen and Professor Arnold in order to achieve a landscaping plan that was developed by all Law School constituencies in a participatory process and has been funded through the generosity of the Charles Hebel family.  This is a community-wide project that will make the Law School a better place.  Thank you for your help, as we work together to make this project a reality!/p

Susan Duncan Appointed To Three Year Term as Dean

Fri, 05/16/2014 - 10:58
pProvost Shirley Willihnganz announced on May 8 that Susan Duncan would be appointed for an additional three years term as Interim Dean.  During the previous two years in which Susan Duncan has served in that role, she has accomplished a great deal and this continued appointment provides the opportunity to continue to place the Brandeis School of Law in a strong position.  Her accomplishments are in the areas of fundraising, connections with alumni/ae, physical plant updates, attention to diversity, staff support, and developing a strategic plan.  Dean Duncan joined the law school faculty in 1999 and is a 1991 graduate of the law school herself.  In accepting the appointment, Dean Duncan stated that, “Serving as the dean for the past two years has been an honor and a privilege.  I thank the President, the Provost, and the law school faculty and staff for their faith in me and look forward to working with all of them on advancing our school.  The strategic plan sets forth a vision that is very exciting.  I know our alumni and friends will help us execute this plan allowing our school to reach new heights.”/ppa href=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/deanduncan-appointment.pdfClick here to read the full story.  /a/p

Who Rules Louisville? A Three week intensive Course on the City May 12 to June 2

Wed, 05/07/2014 - 14:42
!--[if gte mso 9]xml w:WordDocument w:ViewNormal/w:View w:Zoom0/w:Zoom w:TrackMoves/ w:TrackFormatting/ w:PunctuationKerning/ w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/ w:SaveIfXMLInvalidfalse/w:SaveIfXMLInvalid w:IgnoreMixedContentfalse/w:IgnoreMixedContent w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderTextfalse/w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText w:DoNotPromoteQF/ w:LidThemeOtherEN-US/w:LidThemeOther w:LidThemeAsianX-NONE/w:LidThemeAsian w:LidThemeComplexScriptX-NONE/w:LidThemeComplexScript w:Compatibility w:BreakWrappedTables/ w:SnapToGridInCell/ w:WrapTextWithPunct/ w:UseAsianBreakRules/ w:DontGrowAutofit/ w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/ w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/ w:DontFlipMirrorIndents/ w:OverrideTableStyleHps/ /w:Compatibility w:BrowserLevelMicrosoftInternetExplorer4/w:BrowserLevel m:mathPr m:mathFont m:val=Cambria Math/ m:brkBin m:val=before/ m:brkBinSub m:val=#45;-/ m:smallFrac m:val=off/ m:dispDef/ m:lMargin m:val=0/ m:rMargin m:val=0/ m:defJc m:val=centerGroup/ m:wrapIndent m:val=1440/ m:intLim m:val=subSup/ m:naryLim m:val=undOvr/ /m:mathPr/w:WordDocument /xml![endif]-- pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWho rules Louisville?  Who wants to turn Louisville into a wasteland that is starting to look like the next Detroit in Smoketown and West Louisville?   What kind of policies work that create urban regeneration in places like Old Louisville, East Russell, Norton Commons and NuLu?   What can we learn from the economic success stories of Portland (Oregon), Amsterdam and Australia?   Who and where is the command and control center of Louisville?/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/span/ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWe are bringing in the power brokers of Louisville from the rich to the poor, the fourth estate, developers and environmentalists; and many world class urban thinkers./span/ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWe are inviting speakers for our Introduction to the City class May 12 to June 2:/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackCongressman John Yarmuth;  Mayor Greg Fischer, Metro Councilmembers David James and Tom Owen, Tom Fitzgerald, Kentucky Resources Council, Dr. Julian Ageyman Editor of Local Environments and Professor at Tufts; Wendell Berry, Kentucky book author; Greg Squires George Washington University; Marilyn Melkonian developer of 12,000 affordable houses in 22 cities; Courier Journal Editorial Board members; LEO editors and Louisvilleky.com; Wesley Meares, Georgia Regents University;  Larry Gough, green developer;  Ricky Jones, Chair Pan African Studies; Cathy Hinko, Director of Metro Housing Council;  environmental justice field trip with Russ Barnet, Director of KIESD;  field trip to Norton Commons as a new urbanist development;   field trip to NuLu to meet with developer and green visionary Gill Holland;  Jackie Green, Mayoral candidate;  philanthropists such as Edie Bingham and Christy Brown; all are invited to come to our table for peaceful discussion and debate in room 117!  We are also teaming up with the Festival of Faiths to attend a few sessions with Julian Ageyman and Wendell Berry and many others we will get you involved in:  /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blacka href=http://www.centerforinterfaithrelations.org/sacred-earth-sacred-self/http://www.centerforinterfaithrelations.org/sacred-earth-sacred-self//a/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackMost of these speakers have already been confirmed and some are still trying to fit it into their schedule. /span /ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWe are still verifying dates and times but we should have a confirmed schedule as we move to the end of the week.    We will be reading reports produced by the city.  /span /ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackFine Print: /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackIntroduction to the City:  Public Administration, Planning and  Policy.   session 1: three week session in May /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackfirst day- May 12--last day- June 2/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.--with class consent some class times  can be adjusted to better fit student  schedules /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackSession 1 (May 12- June 2, 3 week)/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackSpecial Topics: The City: Public Admin, Policy, amp; Planning/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackUPA680-01/PLAN680-01/PADM683-01   /  credit hours: 3/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackno pre-requisites required, open to all UofL graduates students, advanced undergraduates by permission of instructor.  /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackJohn I. Gilderbloom is a Professor of  Planning  at UofL which is ranked as one of the best academic programs  in the nation.  Dr. Gilderbloom currently directs the multi-million dollar  Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods (a href=http://sun.louisville.eduhttp://sun.louisville.edu/a). Dr. Gilderbloom  has been honored with numerous awards  including the Presidential Medal for Distinguished Faculty Research at the University of Louisville.    In an international poll of thousands of Urbanist, planners and architects, Professor Gilderbloom was ranked one of the “top 100 urban thinkers in the world.quot;  He enjoys singing in the shower, writing and surfing.  /span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhy?/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhy do people in West Louisville / Portland have shorten lives by up to ten years on average? /span /ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhy does Louisville rank as having some of the worst air, water and soil toxins  of any city in the nation?/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhy is climate change our most pressing problem we face as a civilization?/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhy can't Louisville come up with policy and planning solutions to end these problems?/span/p pspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackWhat cities provide models that create prosperity, fairness, green living and reduces catastrophic climate change?/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/span/ppspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: black/spanspan style=font-size: 10pt; font-family: 'Tahoma','sans-serif'; color: blackquot;Introduction to the City quot; is a three week intensive course taught from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. to  give a comprehensive  overview of the city by looking closely at Louisville's political, planning and policy outcomes of decision making.  Half the class is taught outside the classroom with field trips.  We will spend  time touring the city (walking, biking and bus) and learning about struggling and prosperous neighborhoods.   My  approach is to study the players who shape the city:  elected leaders, government, developers, non-profits, news media,  and citizen groups. Our city shapes our life chances but we shape our city: it a dialectic.   We will meet with elected officials from our Congressman, Senator, Mayor, Councilmembers, Neighborhood Associations, and non-profits such as Leadership Louisville and Louisville Central Community Center. This class will attempt to understand the root causes of our problems and come up policy prescriptions that work; we will look at bad examples from Havana to Detroit and good examples from Portland to Amsterdam. We will show you how my urbanist colleagues can access a treasure trove  of data from Photo Archives, MLS, Deed records, PVA office, Kentucky State Data Center, Planning Department, Health, and Economic Development.  Graduate students from Sociology, Geography, Political Science, Planning, History, Art History, Law, Public Health, Women's Studies, Pan African Studies, and Public Administration are welcomed  to take this course.    We will provide room for advanced  undergraduates.     If you have any questions, please contact Dr. John Gilderbloom at a href=mailto:jigild01@louisville.edujigild01@louisville.edu/a or call him at 502-852-8557./span /p

Readers and Writers Unite at the Kentucky Women’s Book Festival

Tue, 05/06/2014 - 10:36
small class=post-metaspan class=comments-linka href=http://uofllibraries.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/kwbf/#respond title=Comment on Readers and Writers Unite at the Kentucky Women’s Book Festival/a/span/small pThe Kentucky Women’s Book Festival endeavors to foster a deeper interest in Kentucky women writers and encourage beginning writers to continue their work and strive to grow with each new venture.  Kentucky writers include those born in Kentucky but now living elsewhere, if they wish to be identified as Kentuckians, as well as those who, although not born here have made Kentucky home./p pThe Kentucky Women’s Book Festival is held on the 3rd Saturday of May. This year it marks the 8th annual festival and will be on May 17, 2014 in the Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville. The event is free and open to all. If you would like to purchase a lunch, please call the a href=http://louisville.edu/womenscenter title=UofL Women's CenterWomen’s Center/a  by May 13 (502) 852-8976 by May 13. (The lunch is $16 and catered by Masterson’s. Those who do not wish to purchase a lunch may still come to the reading.)/p pDoors open at 9:00 with refreshments and discussion, then the speakers begin in the Elaine Chao Auditorium at 9:30 with a href=http://www.georgeellalyon.com/index.htmlGeorge Ella Lyo/an who will  discuss and read from her new book of poetry: iMany-Storied House/i, followed by a href=http://www.bobbieannmason.net/index.htmBobbie Ann Mason/a who will read from her latest novel: iThe Girl in the Blue Beret/i. There are three consecutive morning sessions: Sonja de Vries, a poet; Alison Atlee, an author; and Jannene Winstead amp; Leborah Goodwin who have compiled a cookbook with a bit of Louisville history: a href=http://www.americanownews.com/story/24821344/cookbook-celebrates-architect-of-louisvilles-african-american-neighborhoodsiRecipes and recollections: from the houses Samuel M. Plato Built/i/a. a href=http://www.hollygoddardjones.com/Holly Goddard Jones/a will do a lunchtime reading from her novel iThe Next Time You See Me/i. After lunch is a presentation by a href=http://www.harpercollins.com/author/microsite/About.aspx?authorid=19256Sena Jeter Naslund/a entitled “Knowing the Self Through Knowing the Other,” which will feature the research for her latest novel iThe Fountain of St. James Court; or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman/i, then two more consecutive sessions: Mariam Williams will discuss “Black Arts Movement Pride, Walker’s Womanism and Hillbilly Sisterhood: the African American Women’s Literary Series in the 1990s” and Playwrights Nancy Gall-Clayton amp; Kathi E. B. Wlllis will present “When Characters Speak.”/p pBook purchase and signing will be available throughout the day. For more information, see the a href=http://louisville.edu/womenscenter/programs-events/community/kwbf title=Kentucky Women's Book Festival websiteKWBF website /aor read about it in the a href=http://louisville.edu/womenscenter/newsletters title=UofL Women's Center newsletterWomen’s Center’s spring 2014 newsletter/a. The festival ends at 3:30./ppSource: a href=http://uofllibraries.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/kwbf/UofL Libraries Blog /a/p

Law School Adopts Strategic Plan

Wed, 04/16/2014 - 15:35
!--[if gte mso 9]xml /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 9]xml Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 9]xml /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 10] style /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Table Normal; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} /style ![endif]-- pAt its April 15 Faculty Meeting, the law school faculty passed its Strategic Plan.  This process began a year ago with the formation of a committee of faculty, staff, and students  and input and advice from a very diverse advisory committee of regional alumni, lawyers, and lawyers practicing in other professions was formed to give feedback to the strategic planning process.   The Strategic Plan is a result of 18 committee meetings, several faculty and staff discussions, student forums, and discussions with the advisory committee, alums, members of the legal profession, and members of the university community.  My thanks to all who provided input into this thoughtful and comprehensive process. A special thanks to the committee and the co-chairs Laura Rothstein and Tony Arnold!!/p pnbsp;/p pThe need for a major strategic planning process was a result of several factors.   These include the significant forces of change affecting legal education, the legal profession, and higher education, which require that the Law School change some aspects of what it is doing if it wishes to meet current and future needs and demands. Among these forces are market forces within legal education and the legal profession, the increasing recognition of the importance of development of professional skills, and changes in public funding of higher education and other resource challenges. The plan is neither a complete rejection of all existing structures and functions nor is it only an incremental change. During the Strategic Planning Process, there was close monitoring of ongoing developments within legal education and the legal profession nationally.  This was also an opportunity for the law school to re-examine its research mission.  The goal was to be a proactive approach resulting in a plan that was flexible and allowed for changes.  It contemplates a continuing role of a Strategic Planning Committee that will review and analyze actions in areas that align with the University of Louisville 2020 Plan and the law school's own mission.  /p pnbsp;/p pThe following is the mission statement that is a revision of the previous mission statement.  This better reflects the current and dynamic goals of the law school./p pbLaw School Mission /b/p pThe University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law is a premiere small public law school with a mission to serve the public. Located in the Louisville urban community, it is part of a large comprehensive research university with a state legislative mandate to be a nationally preeminent metropolitan research university. The Law School is guided by the vision of its benefactor and namesake, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis, to: /p p1. Educate students in skills, knowledge, and values for lifelong effectiveness in solving problems and seeking justice by giving them outstanding opportunities to: /p ul type=discliDevelop knowledge of the basic principles of public and private law; /liliDevelop effective skills of legal analysis and written communication, legal research, conflict resolution, problem solving, and other fundamental skills; /liliUnderstand diverse perspectives that influence and are influenced by the law and its institutions, through a diverse faculty and student body, and through legal research and scholarship; /liliUnderstand their ethical responsibilities as representatives of clients, as officers of the court, and as public citizens responsible for the quality and availability of justice; /li/ul p2. Produce and support research that has a high level of impact on scholarship, law, public policy, and/or social institutions; /p p3. Develop and pursue interdisciplinary inquiry; /p p4. Actively engage the community in addressing public problems, resolving conflicts, seeking justice, and building a vibrant and sustainable future through high-quality research and innovative ideas, and application of research to solve public problems and serve the public; /p p5. Actively engage diverse participants in an academic community of students, faculty, and staff that is strengthened by its diversity and its commitment to social justice, opportunity, sustainability, and mutual respect; and /p p6. Develop and use resources efficiently, effectively, and sustainably to achieve mission-critical goals and strategies and to ensure student access to relatively affordable legal education. /p pnbsp;/p pThe plan includes a revised mission statement and sets out Goals and a detailed set of Strategies in the following areas /p pbEducation and Curriculum: /b In keeping with the mission of a comprehensive public research university in an urban environment, ensure that students develop skills, knowledge, and values for lifelong effectiveness in solving problems and seeking justice.b /b/p pbResearch: /bProduce and support research and scholarship that have a high level of impact on scholarship (i.e., the academic body of knowledge and ideas), law, public policy, and/or social institutions. High-impact scholarship includes a diverse range of scholarship and diverse measures of impact. Impact is achieved collectively as an academic unit of scholars, as well as individually over a period of years. Most scholarly impact is not ascertainable immediately upon publication./p pbInterdisciplinary Inquiry: /bDevelop a strong program of interdisciplinary education, scholarship, and service./p pbCommunity Engagement: /bActively engage the community in addressing public problems, resolving conflicts, seeking justice, and building a vibrant and sustainable future through high-quality research, innovative ideas, and application of research to solve public problems and serve the public./p pbDiversity: /b The Law School will actively engage diverse participants in an academic community that is strengthened by its diversity and its commitment to social justice, opportunity, sustainability, and mutual respect./p pbResources: /bIncrease resources, including developing new sources of funding, that enable the Law School to fulfill the critical aspects of its mission and to achieve its goals and strategies, while also adhering to the Law School's long-standing commitment to students' access to a relatively affordable J.D. program. Use resources efficiently, effectively, and sustainably to maximize outcomes for resources expended, including setting priorities for the use of limited funding, time, effort, and expertise.  Promote sustainability in the Law School community and environment, and build partnerships with the University and broader community to seek sustainability./p pnbsp;/p pThe next step will be for the Strategic Planning Committee to develop specific steps (we identified 92 strategies) that should be taken to implement the plan.  /p pnbsp;/p !--[if gte mso 9]xml /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 9]xml Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 9]xml /xml![endif]--!--[if gte mso 10] style /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Table Normal; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} /style ![endif]--

Professor McNeal Delivered the Keynote Address at Harvard Law School Conference

Tue, 04/15/2014 - 21:16
span style=font-size: small; font-family: 'Times New Roman'Professor Laura McNeal was invited to give the keynote address at Harvard Law School on April 15 for the quot;/spanspan style=font-size: small; font-family: 'Times New Roman'40 Years After Milliken: Remedying Racial Disparities in Post-Racial Society Conference.quot; Professor McNeal's talk, quot;From Hollow Hope to New Beginnings: Achieving Educational Equity in the Post-Milliken Era,quot; will critique a series of landmark Supreme Court cases to illustrate how the Court's color-blind rhetoric has undermined efforts to achieve substantive equality in K-12 education. Professor McNeal will also be participating in a panel discussion on the barriers to equal education opportunity in the Post-Fischer era./spanspan style=font-size: small; font-family: 'Times New Roman'br //span