Academics News

Writing Competitions Open to Law Students

A number of organizations sponsor writing competitions that are open to law students.  Many of these competitions have cash prizes, and may also include a funded trip to a meeting to receive the prize.  Law students are strongly encouraged to check the Writing Competitions page on the Law School website and consider entering a competition that may relate to a seminar paper you have written or a journal note.  Perhaps the focus of one of the competitions will help you narrow your topic for a seminar you are currently enrolled in, or research you would like to pursue through an independent study.  The Student Life Office will continue to expand the list of writing competitions as we receive notices throughout the semester. 

For now, competitions are posted on the future of Roe v. Wade ($1,000 cash prize); commerical and bankruptcy law ($3,000 scholarship); international law ($2,000 cash prize); securities arbitration and securities law ($1,000 cash prize); any subject in the field of securities law ($5,000 cash prize); consumer financial services ($1,000 cash prize); and the Affordable Care Act ($250 cash prize).

First Critical Reading Group Meeting - Sept. 10

A space for students to engage in critical dialogue about the law, the law school experience, the legal profession, and work in their own communities.

If you are interested in discussing the role of the law in hot issues such as immigration, mass incarceration, abortion, gay rights, affirmative action and women equality this is the place for you.

First Group Meeting: Tuesday Sept. 10th, Room 171, 1-2:15 p.m.

For more information, contact Professor Aníbal Rosario Lebrón.

*CORRECTION* Prof. Metzmeier's Program: Writing a Research Paper for Writing Requirement Credit, Sept. 10, 12:05 - 1:00, Rm 175

On Tuesday, September 10, Professor Kurt Metzmeier will be presenting a not-to-be-missed session geared toward upper-division students that aims to demystify the writing requirement as well as provide practical information on some of the best sources for generating ideas for topics, ways to organize your research paper, and common pitfalls to avoid. The session will be held in Room 175 from 12:05pm - 1:00pm. 

Program: Writing a Research Paper for Writing Requirement Credit
Time: September 10, 2013 12:05pm – 1:00pm in Room 175
Instructor: Kurt Metzmeier

Professor Metzmeier describes his presentation as follows:              
This one-hour session will begin by discussing the student handbook section that sets out the writing requirement, noting its importance as a core requirement of a professional degree.  Then general advice on picking a topic will be given, with some emphasis on library resources like subject-specific legal newsletters, ProfBlogs, and general legal news sources that may helpful in generating topics. Researching the policy aspects of legal issues that come up in seminar papers will be briefly discussed, leading to a treatment of issues involved in writing of a research paper.  Issues discussed may include creating outlines, constructing a thesis, resolving common style and grammar issues, proofreading, and avoiding plagiarism by the proper use of quotation and citation.  Given the limited time to discuss these matters, liberal mention will be given to library resources like Eugene Volokh’s Academic Legal Writing: Law Review Articles, Student Notes, and Seminar Papers, and the collection of other legal writing books on reserve in the law library. (I have a few copies of these works which may be checked out from the Academic Success Office's library.)

You can definitely get a head start on your seminar paper and lower your stress level by attending this informative event.

 

Did You Know...?

Practicing mindfulness can help you be more successful.

Recent research evidence shows mindfulness results in improvements in: cognitive function and flexibility (concentration, memory and learning), stress reduction, emotional reactivity and ability to be self aware and self manage, productivity and overall well-being. A short snippet of one study supporting these findings published in the Oxford Journals can be found here:

http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/8/1/85.short

For more information about how to practice mindfulness in your work life, check out the following link:

http://mindfulnessatwork.ie/the-journal-how-practising-mindfulness-can-help-your-work-life-may-2013/

Are you struggling to select a seminar paper topic, or confused by the writing requirement?

If so, then we have the perfect presentation for you! On Tuesday, September 10, Professor Kurt Metzmeier will be presenting a not-to-be-missed session geared toward upper-division students that aims to demystify the writing requirement as well as provide practical information on some of the best sources for generating ideas for topics, ways to organize your research paper, and common pitfalls to avoid. The session will be held in Room 175 from 12:05pm - 1:05pm.  I want to make clear that this program is designed to supplement, not supplant, the role of the seminar instructor in setting the requirements and expectations for papers in his or her class.

Program: Writing a Research Paper for Writing Requirement Credit
Time: September 10, 2013 12:05pm – 1:05pm in Room 175
Instructor: Kurt Metzmeier

Professor Metzmeier describes his presentation as follows:              
This one-hour session will begin by discussing the student handbook section that sets out the writing requirement, noting its importance as a core requirement of a professional degree.  Then general advice on picking a topic will be given, with some emphasis on library resources like subject-specific legal newsletters, ProfBlogs, and general legal news sources that may helpful in generating topics. Researching the policy aspects of legal issues that come up in seminar papers will be briefly discussed, leading to a treatment of issues involved in writing of a research paper.  Issues discussed may include creating outlines, constructing a thesis, resolving common style and grammar issues, proofreading, and avoiding plagiarism by the proper use of quotation and citation.  Given the limited time to discuss these matters, liberal mention will be given to library resources like Eugene Volokh’s Academic Legal Writing: Law Review Articles, Student Notes, and Seminar Papers, and the collection of other legal writing books on reserve in the law library. (I have a few copies of these works which may be checked out from the Academic Success Office's library.)

You can definitely get a head start on your seminar paper and lower your stress level by attending this informative event.

 

Research Assistant Position Available

Applications for the position as Research Assistant to Professor Manning Warren, holder of the H. Edward Harter Chair of Commercial Law, are now being considered. The position entails general research in corporate, agency and the common law of fiduciary duty, among other areas, and should complement legal concepts and skills developed in the classroom.  The position is for twenty (20) hours per week during F2013 and Sp2014..

You should submit a copy of your resumé and a transcript of your grades, together with any other materials related to your qualifications to Janet Sullivan in room 247 of the law school on or before September 12, 2013.

Accommodations

The Office of Student Life at the School of Law works closely with the University's Disability Resource Center (DRC) to provide accommodations to law students. If you received accommodations in the spring and want those to continue, you need to contact DRC and Dean Ballard by September 1, if you have not already done so. At DRC, contact your prior advisor or Ms Cathy Patus, the Director. Ms Patus's email is clpatu01@louisville.edu; Dean Ballard's is kimberly.ballard@louisville.edu. An email to DRC with a copy to Dean Ballard is fine.

If you have not had accommodations previously, but wish to request them, please contact Cathy Patus and copy Dean Ballard on the email. Questions?  Please review the UofL Law Handbook for Applicants and Students with Disabilities at http://www.law.louisville.edu/students/disabilities.

Did You Know...?

Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress

A recent study by Princeton scientists found that exercise is a good tool for dealing with stress. As with other recent findings in neuroscience, the study seems to illuminate how marvelously adaptable our brains are, and how by modifications in our own behavior we can affect our brain chemistry. A short snippet on the study can be found here:

http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S37/28/70Q72/.

 

Spring 2014 Exam Schedule Posted; Class Schedule Revised

A draft final exam schedule for the Spring 2014 semester has been posted here.  A revised version of the Spring 2014 course schedule, with more adjunct courses filled in and other details supplied, has been posted here.  I am trying to have schedules as up to date as possible before the end of the Fall drop-add period, but you should also periodically check the schedules to make sure you have the most up to date version possible  (check the date on the top of each page).

Labor & Employment Law Seminar Prerequisites

The Labor and Employment Law Seminar listed for Spring 2014 is an Advanced Labor and Employment Law Seminar which requires a prerequisite of Labor Law or Employment Law, or the equivalent.  If you wish to take the basic course, you should take them this semester (Fall 2013).  Employment Law will not be offered again until the 2013-2014 academic school year.  Labor Law will probably not be offered again until the 2014-2015 academic school year.