Academics News

Academic Success Tip - Save Time for Proofreading

Legal writing requires diligent editing and careful proofreading.  For any writing project, be sure to reserve time for these important skills.  Set your paper aside for a few hours or for a day and review it with fresh eyes to omit unnecessary words, to revise for clarity, and to correct spelling, punctuation or grammatical errors.   

Academic Success Tip - Campus Health Services

As a law student, you may take advantage of the services offered through the Belknap Campus Health Center.  Campus Health provides confidential, affordable, and student-focused medical, mental, and health education services to all students in the university community.  For example, Campus Health Services provides confidential psychiatric services at no-charge to any student for a variety of mental health issues including:

• New or existing depression or other mood problems
• Panic attacks or other forms of anxiety
• Eating disorders
• Sleep problems
• Difficulty concentrating
• Feeling totally "stressed out" or overwhelmed
• Problems with alcohol or drugs

Other campus health services include counseling, primary care, personal nutrition counseling and self-management support, prescription assistance, and Yoga and Pilates classes.  To learn more about the services you can take advantage of this semester and throughout the school year, visit the Campus Health website at https://louisville.edu/campushealth/. 

Spring 2011 Exam in Prof. Mackey's Legal History Class

Professor Mackey's Legal History class in Spring 2011 (LAW 838, meeting Mondays and Wednesdays, 7:25 to 8:40 p.m.) will have a final exam on Wednesday, May 4, at 6:00 p.m.  This will appear information will also appear in the registration packet.  Please note that Professor Metzmeier's Legal History class in Spring 2011 (LAW 838, meeting Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:00 to 10:15 a.m.) will NOT have a final exam.

Academic Success Tip - Understanding the Reading

What if I am on top of my reading, but feel clueless about some of the material?

  • Go through your class notes and try to determine what specific questions you have about the course.
  • Write down your questions and where the reference is in your notes/casebook so that you can find the spot quickly if you need to refer back to it.
  • Read a study aid to gain more understanding about the specific topic.
  • Some learners clear up their confusion by outlining the material.  By “pulling it together” for inclusion in an outline, the material is no longer abstract or confusing.
  • If you still have questions, ask for help from your classmates or your professor. 
  • The more specific you can be about your questions, the easier it will be for someone to help you.
  • Have your class notes/casebook with you when you ask for help so that you can show the person the material that is confusing you.

Academic Success Tip - Follow Instructions

Whether you are working on a writing assignment (BLS open memo) or getting ready to take an exam, one of the easiest and most important things to remember is to follow your professors' instructions.  Should your paper be single-spaced or double-spaced?  What are the margin requirements?  What font is recommended?  Where are you supposed to write your exam number?  How many copies do you need to submit, and in what format?  Whatever the instructions may be, do not overlook them.  You do not want to lose points over careless mistakes

Law School Welcomes Distinguished Scholar in Law and Public Policy

The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law welcomes Christopher Slobogin as its Fall 2010 Distinguished Scholar in Law and Public Policy.  Professor Slobogin is the Milton Underwood Chair in Law, Professor of Psychiatry, and Director of the Criminal Justice Program at Vanderbilt University.  He will give a faculty workshop on September 30 on "The Future of the Fourth Amendment."  Each semester, the Law School identifies a nationally renowned scholar in law and public policy to give a workshop as part of its Faculty Workshop Series, enhancing the exchange of ideas and intellectual inquiry at the Law School, particularly at the intersetion of law and public policy.

Spring 2011 Schedule Released & Summer Courses Identified

The current version of the Spring 2011 schedule (with exam schedule) is attached as a PDF.  This is the version that will be used for registration in early November unless there are errors that need correction or unusual circumstances necessitating change. 

 

There were a number of changes to the first draft that was released in mid-August, mostly in response to student input (to the extent practical and feasible).  Unfortunately, we cannot now add entirely new classes unless one or more classes do not receive sufficient enrollment during registration.  

 

In the next two weeks, the course notes will be released, including course descriptions for 999 courses, but the course notes are still being completed at this time. 

 

If you have questions, please contact Dean Arnold at tony.arnold@louisville.edu.  If you would like advice as you put together your spring schedule, Dean Arnold, Dean Bean, or Ms. Ballard would be glad to talk with you.

 

The courses that we can offer in Summer 2011 have also been identified.  They are: a) Basic Income Tax (4) (Blackburn) (core); b) Decedents Estates (4) (Jones) (core); c) Externships (Jordan) (skills); d) Land & Ecosystem Conservation (2) (Arnold) (writing seminar; will meet 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. every day for the first week of the summer session with field trips/research in the region and then there will be no more class meetings while students write papers over the remainder of the summer term); e) Restorative Justice (2) (Duncan) (skills); f) Solo Practice Management (2) (Urbach and adjuncts) (skills); and g) Women and the Law (2) (Fischer) (writing seminar; perspectives). 

 

In the next two weeks, at least 3 different scheduling options for these courses will be presented to students for feedback from students who plan to take summer classes.  Unfortunately, though, the summer teaching budget is totally maxed out, which means we cannot add any other courses to the summer schedule.  This schedule represents a 40% increase in course offerings over the previous summer in an effort to meet many different student interests and needs.

Academic Success Tip - Course Outlines (a reminder)

How are your course outlines coming along?  By now, you should have enough information in each course to begin outlining.  Then, you want to add to your outlines regularly – preferably every other week.  Remember that your outlines will be your primary study aids for exams.  Once you have a good outline for a segment of the course, your class notes and case briefs will no longer be your focus for that part of the material.

Academic Success Tip - Handling Pressure

I’m stressed!  What can I do? 

  • Structure your time carefully so that you know what you are going to accomplish each day and each week.  You are less likely to waste time or overwork on tasks if you stick to structured time blocks labeled by task. 
  • Focus on each small task instead of becoming distracted by a multitude of other tasks.  When you study 2-207 for Contracts, do not think about your Torts class.  When you study “piercing the corporate veil” for Business Organizations, do not distract yourself with thinking about depreciation for Basic Income Tax.
  • Condense the volume of information to the important information you will use on the exam.  Keep condensing your outlines to focus on the “big picture” if you tend to bog down in details.
  • Use positive self-talk so that you do not get discouraged. You have the potential of being your own enemy if you make negative comments to yourself.  Congratulate yourself for completing tasks. 
  • Minimize your non-law school commitments.  If you work, cut back your hours.  Avoid taking on additional responsibilities with organizations, community activities, or volunteer services.

Academic Success Tip - Handling Pressure

Use a reward system to keep your motivation up.  Decide small rewards for yourself for completion of small tasks.  Small rewards might be:  a bubble bath; one ½-hour television show; one computer game; popcorn; a walk with the dog; a play break with your child.  Decide large rewards for yourself for completion of large tasks: a night at the movies; dinner with friends at a nice restaurant; two hours reading a novel; a new outfit; attending Lawlapalooza!  When you have a reward to look forward to, you are more likely to stay motivated in completing your work.