Academics News

Academic Success Tip - Review Your Outlines

Review; review; and then review.  You want the course information to be as comfortable as a baggy pair of sweats when you walk into the exam.  If you do not consistently review material throughout the remainder of the semester, you will walk into your exams with information that feels like a stiff new suit instead.  Deep understanding and quick retrieval from memory pay off because of the time constraints of exams.  You can recognize the nuances in answer choices or fact patterns better, and you will not waste time trying to remember the material.  If you get in the habit of reviewing your outlines each week, you will have a better understanding of the material and will be better prepared for the intense course review before finals.

Academic Success Tip - Get Caught Up on Your Outlines

The time of the semester is here when you have no choice but to start thinking about exams.  There are only three weeks of classes left.  You need to have a plan for exam studying or you will have too much to learn and not enough time in which to learn it.  Get caught up on your outlines quickly.  Your outlines will be your master documents for studying.  If you wait too long to get them up-to-date, you will not have enough time to review the material for deep understanding.  If you have the world’s best outline and do not study it thoroughly, you will not perform as well as you could on exams.  Your goal this weekend should be to catch up on your outlines and then outline every week.

Academic Success Tip - Find Time for Exam Prep

Tip #4:  Allow time for three types of outline review.   Making the world’s greatest outline is counter-productive if there is no time to learn and review it.  One type of review is intense studying to learn the material in your outline initially (several topics or sub-topics each study period).  The second type of review is regular reading through the outline from cover to cover to reinforce material that you have already learned and anticipate material that you will learn (at least once a week).  The third type of review is additional careful studying of areas that still confuse you or are hard to remember (as often as needed to “conquer” the topic).

Academic Success Tip - Find Time for Exam Prep

Tip #3:  Become aware of when you lose focus.  Determine why you are losing concentration.  Then, determine whether you can correct the situation.  Do you need to make your reading more active by asking questions as you read?  Do you need to move to a quieter place?  Do you need to write a reminder note so that you stop worrying about forgetting something?  Are you hungry and need a quick snack?    If you cannot re-capture your focus, then take a short break and come back once you are refreshed.

November 1 deadline for input on Summer 2011 schedule options

November 1 is the deadline to provide your preferences among the 4 schedule options for Summer 2011 (via email to tony.arnold@louisville.edu, in Dean Arnold's mailbox, or to Dean Arnold or Ms. Siegwald in person).  This is for anyone who thinks that he or she might take a course this coming summer.  A choice will be made and publicized by November 4.  Thank you very much.

Find Time for Exam Prep

Tip #2:  Take advantage of “windfall” time.   Always keep tasks handy that can be used as study “fillers” when unexpected time becomes available.  Working with flashcards, rewriting a rule several times for memory, or reviewing a chunk of an outline can create productive time when a ride or study buddy is late.

Notice on Written Advocacy (Professor Jones) in Spring 2011

The Seminar in Written Advocacy (Prof. Jones), Spring 2011, can be used to satisfy either the upper-division writing requirement or the upper-division skills requirement.  However, academic rules prohibit students from using the course to satisfy both requirements with the same course.  Therefore, each student must elect which of the two requirements the course will satisfy by notifying Professor Jones.

New Clarification re Problems in Corporation Law (Prof. Warren) in Spring 2011

Problems in Corporation Law (Professor Warren), Spring 2011, will meet the writing requirement but will NOT meet the skills requirement.  We apologize for any confusion, as the details of the course content in relationship to the academic rules have been worked out.

Academic Success Tip - Find Time for Exam Preparation

Everybody is (or should be) sliding into “studying for exams” mode.  Time becomes a critical variable now.  It is important to find time for all of your tasks.  It is also important to be productive with that time.  This week's tips will focus on how to get more time out of each day and be more productive during studying.


Tip #1:  Evaluate your day for “lost” time.   Look for time wasted in the following ways:  unproductive time between classes; assignment time stretched to 3 hours when with more diligence it could have been finished in 2 ½ hours; delay in starting a project because “I have all day;” inefficient and scattered errand running or other non-school tasks; completion of chores or other non-school tasks during prime study time.  If only ½ hour is captured each day of the week, it nets 3 ½ hours of extra study time.

Academic Success Tip - Walk Away From Temptation

Law school classmates are sometimes the hardest to say “no” to because they are adept at arguing that not studying is reasonable.  After all, if they can convince someone else to waste time, their own wasting time isn’t as obvious.

Instead, walk away from temptation.  Focus on one day at a time.  All you can ask of yourself is your best.  Work as hard as you can each day while allowing time for meals and sleep.  Then, you can go to bed knowing that you did all you could do that day.