Alumni News

14th Annual Student Bar Foundation Charity Auction

Law Library Extends Loan Period

The loan period for most borrowers has been extended from 14 to 28 days. This applies only to circulating materials.

Careers in Community Organizing for Social Justice

The Direct Action & Research Training (DART) Center will be on the U of L law campus on Monday, February 7 at 6:00pm in W303A in the Student Activities Center to discuss careers in the field of community organizing with students interested in empowering their communities and working for social change.

Please RSVP if you are interested by contacting Hannah Wittmer by calling 785.841.2680 with your name, phone #, email address and school.

After years of research into best practices, experimentation, evaluation, and refinement, the Organizers Institute has become THE elite field school in the training of grassroots community organizers in the country.

DART is now accepting applications for the 2011 DART Organizers Institute, the paid, four-month field school for people interested in launching a career in community organizing. Participants will undergo a combined classroom and field training covering such topics as:
  • Entering a community
  • Identifying and training local leaders
  • Strategic planning and issue cutting
  • Relationship and community building
  • Direct Action on community issues
  • Fundraising
The DART Center, has built coalitions throughout the country that have won important victories on a broad set of justice issues including:
  • Education reform in low-performing public schools
  • Job Training
  • Drugs and Violence
  • Criminal Recidivism
  • Living Wage
  • Neighborhood Revitalization
  • Predatory Lending
  • Affordable Housing, etc.
The DART Organizers Institute combines a 7-day classroom orientation with 15 weeks of infield training at a local grassroots organization and in-field training site.  Organizer Trainees are provided with a cost of living stipend and travel.  Room, board, and tuition will also be paid by DART during the seven-day classroom training.  After successful completion of the program, DART will place graduates into permanent full-time salaried positions earning $30,000-$35,000/year + benefits.  DART is a 501(c)(3) organization, therefore, employees of the DART Network are eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness under the recently enacted College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

The 7-day classroom orientation and 15-week infield training start in July 2011. Training locations will include placements in several states around the country.

Although it may be helpful, no direct experience is necessary. Organizer Trainees (OTs) hired to participate in the DART Organizers Institute must demonstrate a desire to pursue community organizing as a long-term professional career. A master's degree, JD, or similar life experience is preferred though not necessary. Candidates must have a college degree or be graduating prior to July 2011. Also, candidates must display a workmanlike diligence, be driven to produce sustained results, have proven capacity to build relationships of trust, create and execute a plan, act professionally, feel comfortable working with religious institutions, be accountable and willing to hold others accountable, demonstrate disciplined thought and action, and work in a team setting.  OTs must also have access to a car during their training and be flexible regarding relocation. Fluency in Spanish/English is a plus and people of color are encouraged to apply.

Low-moderate income communities across the country are feeling the bite of the recession that began in December 2007. Cutbacks in human services and education, layoffs and persistent unemployment, home foreclosures, increased youth violence, predatory lending, and other serious issues are day-to-day realities for many. Now is the time for a new generation of community organizers to step up, unite people, and transform our communities. DART is recruiting and training that new generation.

To find out more about DART or to apply, we encourage you to contact Hannah Wittmer at  (785) 841-2680. You can download applications or view profiles from previous OTs at the DART website.  

Law School Graduates Awarded by LBA

Congratulations to two outstanding graduates that were recognized at the Louisville Bar Association's Annual Bench & Bar Dinner on January 20.

  • Mark W. Dobbins, Class of 1978, Judge Richard A. Revell Family Law Practitioner Award
  • Linda S. Ewald, Class of 1972, Judge Benjamin F. Shobe Civility & Professionalism Award







Boehl Distinguished Lecture in Land Use Policy

Professor Judith Welch Wegner of the University of North Carolina Law School will present the Boehl Distinguished Lecture in Land Use Policy on "Annexation, Urban Boundaries and Land Use Dilemmas: Learning from the Past and Preparing for the Future" Thursday, January 27 at 6PM in Room 275.

The event is free and open to the public, as well as all members of the Law School and University communities.  No RSVP is required.  A reception will follow.

 

Spotlight on Louisville Law Clinic

In the midst of a court fight with his landlord over an eviction notice, Tom Rankin asked
Jefferson District Court Judge Donald Armstrong if he needed a lawyer.

“It wouldn't hurt,” the judge responded, and on heir way out of the courtroom, Rankin was
approached by a representative of Legal Aid, which provides free legal help to people of
limited income, who said she could refer them to an attorney.

Well, he wasn't actually an “attorney,” officially speaking.

The Rankins were referred to the University of Louisville Law Clinic, where they met with Blake Nolan, a third-year law student, one of eight allowed to practice law last semester at the clinic on Muhammad Ali Boulevard, gaining experience while reaching out to an underserved population.

Nolan had never handled an eviction case, “But he was good,” Rankin said, and worked out an agreement with the landlord that led to the case being dismissed.

“He knew what he was doing,” Rankin said. “I was really impressed with the way he handled everything. … I really don't think I could have done it without him.”

Nolan was participating in a program launched in July 2009 that so far has allowed 25 U of L law students to help nearly 300 clients at no charge in Jefferson County Family and District courts — including 187 victims of domestic violence and their children seeking protective orders.

And the clinic is growing, with a record 15 students enrolled for the semester that began this month.

The clinic is primarily funded by gifts to the university and if the students take the clinic as a course, it is part of their law school tuition and fees. They must have at least 60 credit hours to sign up for the clinic, and receive four credits for their participation. They are able to work as practicing student attorneys through a limited license granted by the Kentucky Supreme Court, and only with supervision. In October, the Center for Women and Families, the Legal Aid Society and Law Clinic received a combined $438,000 in grant money to represent victims of domestic violence, allowing, in part, the funding of four more student attorneys and an additional part-time attorney to supervise them.

Shelley Santry, a U of L law professor and former prosecutor who heads the clinic, said the student attorneys funded by the new grant –— the clinic's share is $110,000 — will focus on custody cases for unmarried, low-income victims of domestic violence.

Many of those victims are unable to afford an attorney, and “No one does those kind of cases pro bono now,” she said. “Custody disputes are difficult, time consuming and often emotional.”

Santry said many schools across the country have long had similar clinics, which allow students who have had two years of learning through courses to “apply what they have learned to real people with real problems.”

“Our nurses,doctors and teachers all practice before they go into the real world,” she said. “Our lawyers don't. They graduate and they're like, ‘Where's the courthouse?' You just can't beat learning by doing in my opinion.”

Nolan, who has handled about 10 cases and will be back this semester at the clinic, agreed. “There's nothing better than getting some real world experience in a courtroom and in front of a judge,” he said.

It's also nice to be able to help people in need, said Julie Purcell, a 25-year-old rdthird-year student from Louisville who in December helped an elderly woman who was being evicted because the rent money she had given to a family member never made it to her landlord.

“It's just awesome,” said Purcell, who has handled about 20 cases, and was able to have the case dismissed, got Adult Protective Services involved and saw the woman moved into new housing.“We're able to learn so much, but at the same time provide a service to people that otherwise wouldn't get it.”

Chief Family Court Judge Patricia Walker FitzGerald said she regularly sees the student attorneys in her courtroom, usually in domestic-violence cases, and has found them to be well-prepared, asking good questions and “doing an excellent job” in often difficult cases.

“They've really stepped up to the plate to do a much needed service,” she said.

And alumni of the program are turning up as prosecutors and public defenders, and several have opened their own firms.

“Most people will graduate without ever having been in a real courtroom in front of a judge,” said Heend Sheth, who graduated in May and is a prosecutor with the Jefferson County Attorney's Office. “… And at the end of the day, you are helping people. You really do get to see your skills manifest in someone else's changed circumstances.”

Reporter Jason Riley can be reached at (502) 584-2197.

Reprinted with permission.

Source: "Louisville law students gain experience, help underserved through free clinic", by Jason Riley (Courier-Journal, January 23, 2011)

 

Campus Construction

Due to public safety concerns, pedestrian access will be eliminated around the construction site at the northeast corner of Third Street and Eastern Parkway. The Third Street sidewalk from the corner to the Cardinal Shuttle stop just south of the Oval is being closed immediately. The sidewalk from that corner east on Eastern Parkway is being closed up to the Natural Science Building. Also, the Third Street sidewalk south of Eastern Parkway near the Engineering Graphics parking lot will be closed soon for utilities work. During that time pedestrians need to cross Third Street near the entrance to the Engineering Graphics lot, proceed north on Third, and cross back at the Eastern-Third Street intersection. Signs will mark all closures and alternate routes.

December Bar Briefs

Here are some highlights from the December 2010 issue of the Louisville Bar Association's Bar Briefs publication.

  • "From the President's Desk: A Helping Hand" by Laurel S. Doheny, '92 (p. 3)
  • "Jefferson District Court Reorganization" by Hon. Sean R. Delahanty, '80 (p. 4-5)
  • "Longitude" by Dean Jim Chen (p. 6)
  • "Law of the Left" by D. Scott Furkin, '82 (p. 7)
  • "Change Employers Can Count On: The Effects of Healthcare Reform" by Jason Lee and Carole D. Christian, '88 (p. 14-15)
  • "2010 Public Service Committee Year End Briefing" by Michelle Mees Harper, '03 (p. 16)
A copy is available in the library's reserves. 

University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law Seeks Distinguished Visiting Professor, 2011-12

The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law seeks applications from renowned legal educators for a year-long appointment as the Ralph Petrilli Distinguished Visiting Professor for the 2011-12 academic term.  The Petrilli Distinguished Visiting Professor will teach a total of 3 classes.  One of these classes will be the year-long legal writing and analysis course in a small section of about 20 students.  [The legal writing and analysis course is entitled Basic Legal Skills.  It does not include legal research, which is taught in a separate course.  Given that it is a year-long course, the teaching package is the functional equivalent of a 4-course package.]  One course will be Professional Responsibility in an accelerated format in Fall 2011.  The third course, in Spring 2012, could include Domestic Relations (family law), an upper-level skills elective, or a seminar on a mutually agreeable topic.  The successful applicant must be a person "renowned for exceptional contributions to law, legal institutions or legal education."  To apply, please send a letter of interest and a c.v. to Professor Tony Arnold, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development, Brandeis School of Law, Wyatt Hall, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 or tony.arnold@louisville.edu, no later than January 15, 2011.  Please contact Dean Arnold at his email address or at (502) 852-6388 with any questions.

Negotiation Team Wins 2nd Place in ABA Regional Competition

Please congratulate Nicole Crump and Jeff Hall, who won 2nd place in the ABA Regional Negotiation Competition this past weekend as one of two teams from the Law School.  The competition was held in Detroit with teams from law schools in Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Ontario.