Faculty News

Law & War—An International Humanitarian Law Workshop

The American Red Cross is pleased to invite you to attend Law & War: An International Humanitarian Law Workshop at Vanderbilt University Law School on November 8th and 9th.  This workshop is a two day intensive introduction to international humanitarian law (IHL) for law students, graduate students, and attorneys.  During this training, participants will receive instruction from leading humanitarian law practitioners and explore the law in practice through a series of case studies.  Participants will learn about the historical development of the law, conflict classification, restrictions on means and methods of warfare, protections for vulnerable persons during armed conflict, enforcement of IHL and much more.

The workshop and all course materials are provided to accepted students at no cost. Registration is currently open and applications must be submitted by Friday, October 17th.  Applications can be found at online at http://redcross.org/lawworkshop. This workshop is a fabulous opportunity for those interested in learning more about, or pursuing a career in international humanitarian law.

Interested students may contact Kimberly Huey for additional information at kimberly.huey@redcross.org.

Resilient Communities and War on Poverty To Be Addressed in Boehl Lecture

Professor Tony Arnold, Boehl Chair in Property and Land Use, will give a lecture on “The War on Poverty (50 Years Later) and Resilient Communities” on Tuesday, October 14, 2014, at 12:00 Noon, in Room 275 of the Brandeis School of Law. The lecture is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be served, but attendees should bring their own drinks. There is no need to RSVP.

The lecture, part of the Boehl Distinguished Lecture Series in Land Use Policy, will start with a Kentucky connection. In 1964 President Lyndon B. Johnson visited Inez, KY, shortly after launching the War on Poverty, one of our nation’s most ambitious initiatives. In the past 50 years, the War on Poverty has had both critics and supporters, both failures and successes. In framing poverty as something to be fought and defeated, though, our policies have failed to focus on building resilience and adaptive capacity among low-income communities, which are affected by their natural and physical environments and land use patterns, according to Arnold. Resilient communities are ones that are able to adapt to changing conditions and surprise disturbances, such as floods, drought, urban heat island effects, economic downturns, mortgage foreclosure crises, and the like.

 

 

 

 

Professor Tony Arnold, the inaugural holder of the Boehl Chair in Property and Land Use at the University of Louisville, is among the nation’s leading experts on social-ecological resilience and governance institutions. He teaches in both the Brandeis School of Law and the Department of Urban and Public Affairs and directs the interdisciplinary Center for Land Use and Environmental Responsibility. He has worked on poverty issues with low-income urban and rural communities throughout his personal and professional life.  

The Boehl Distinguished Lecture Series in Land Use Policy is sponsored by the Herbert Boehl Fund and the Kentucky Research Challenge Trust Fund. Co-sponsors at the University of Louisville are: the Center for Land Use and Environmental Responsibility; the Center for Environmental Policy and Management; the Planning Student Organization; the Master of Public Administration Students; the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research; the Law School Diversity Committee; the Sustainability Scholars Roundtable; the Environmental Law and Land Use Society; & the Office of Community Engagement. The Lecture will be a Law School Diversity Event.

Represent, for the Unrepresented.

You could spend the summer of 2015 as the next Ellen B. Ewing Fellow, assisting the under-represented in practice areas like family law, domestic violence and spouse abuse, and HIV/AIDS. How can you support this great cause now? Come out to Lawlapalooza, the Louisville legal community's annual battle of the bands, Thursday, October 16, 2014 at the Phoenix Hill Tavern.

Tickets for Lawlapalooza, are on sale now in the Law Resource Center (Room 272), $10 each, and this year's show will feature three bands representing the Brandeis School of Law: The Grateful Decedents, with 3Ls Mina Khalil and Greg Daly; The Perpetual Motions, with 3L Emily DeVuono; and defending champs, The Subconscionables, with 2L Megan Conroy, Prof. Tim Hall and Asst. Dean Jim Becker.

This year’s theme, “A Bran Deis Night,” commemorates 50 years of Beatlemania, with every band performing Beatles favorites. Doors open at 6:00 pm, and the first of eight bands, featuring local attorneys and law students, performs at 6:30.

This annual event brings the Louisville legal community together for a great cause, great music and a lot of fun. Hope to see you there!

The Dean's Newsletter - Fall 2014

Read the quick version. 

Oval Closed Tomorrow

As you may already be aware the University will be holding “The Spectacular Event” during the evening of the September 18th at 6:00 p.m. The rain date is on September 19th. Preparation for this event will begin on September 17th and will require traffic lane changes on the Oval. The Oval will be converted into 2-way traffic for both days. Parking & Transportation Services and University Police will have staff on-site to assist. Please keep in mind that on the 18th the Oval will be closed at 5:00 p.m for all traffic. The Oval will reopen at approximately 10:00 p.m.

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 5

The latest issue of our SSRN Research Paper series features articles by Professors Arnold, Levinson, Milligan and Mark Rothstein.

More information about the RPS:

Mark Your Calendar - Courtyard Dedication and First Brandeis Brief Break Ice Cream Social!!

Get ready for the first Brandeis Brief Break of the year.  In addition, we will be dedicating the newly restored courtyard at the same time!

 

Wednesday, September 24th, 12:15 pm - 2 pm in the Mosaic Lobby and Courtyard.

 

Comfy Cow Ice Cream will be provided!  Stop by an enjoy the ice cream and courtyard.

From University IT: Integrated Address Books Being Restored

From University IT ...

Good news! IT has begun the process to restore the integrated address books in both Exchange and CardMail. Over the next week you will begin to see your Exchange and CardMail address books re-populate with names from both email systems. When complete the address books will contain the names of all users who have an active university email account, including faculty, staff, students and retirees. Notification will be sent when the process has completed.

Two noticeable changes from the previous integrated address books:

  • For some individuals you will see two entries in the address books. This indicates that person has both an Exchange and CardMail account. When using the address book you should take care to select the appropriate entry.
  • Lync sessions created between CardMail and Exchange accounts will now require use of the complete email address, for example, imuserid@exchange.louisville.edu or imuserid@cardmail.louisville.edu. You will no longer be able to select entries from the address books.

We thank you for your patience while we addressed the various problems encountered with your email service.

Questions: Contact the HelpDesk at 852-7997 or helpdesk@louisville.edu.

UofL Grant Takes Aim at Legal Barriers That Hinder Genetic Research

University of Louisville law and medicine professor Mark A. Rothstein has received a two- year $612,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to foster international collaboration on genetic research while maintaining human rights and privacy.

Rothstein is an expert on the legal and ethical issues raised by genetic research—including compiling large collections of biological specimens.

“International collaboration in genetic research is extremely valuable in advancing understanding and developing new therapies,” Rothstein said. “We need to make sure that essential privacy laws don't unnecessarily interfere with research."

Rothstein has a joint appointment at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law and the School of Medicine. He holds the Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and is the founding director of the university’s Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law. He frequently writes and comments on issues of bioethics, genetics and health privacy.

Rothstein will conduct the research with co-investigator Bartha Maria Knoppers, a medicine professor and director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Legal experts from 26 countries will take part in the research effort.

Their findings and recommendations will take aim at removing legal impediments to international collaboration on health research and be published in the Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics in 2016.

Professor Enid Trucios-Haynes to Receive the Lee A. Webb Award