Faculty News

Bench & Bar

The March 2013 issue of the Kentucky Bar Association's Bench & Bar is now available online in both PDF and Flip Book format.

In her report, Interim Dean Susan Duncan, showcases the law school's Criminal Law curriculum and Professors Abramson, Weaver, and Milligan, to coincide with the issue's commemoration of the Golden Anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright, "the U.S. Supreme Court case extending to state court criminal defendants the right to legal counsel under the Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments."

This issue also includes an article by Professor Luke M. Milligan entitled, "Hugo's Trumpet," a nod to Anthony Lewis's book, Gideon's Trumpet, about the constitutional right to counsel.

Law School Appreciation Week Kick-Off

Join law school students, faculty, staff and alumni out in front of the law school building on the portico for the kick-off to Law School Appreciation Week.

Sign our huge thank you banner to show those who have supported you that you appreciate their contributions.

 

Monday, April 8, from 11:30-2:30

Free Popcorn

The Beginning of the World (Wide Web) As We Know It

Mosaic 1.0, the graphical browser that popularized the World Wide Web in the 1990s, was released 20 years ago this month. While not the first Web browser, Mosaic's importance was its inclusion of images and availability for Windows computers. Previously, Web browsers had been limited to text and the Unix operating system.

An interesting historical footnote: The first Windows Web browser, Cello, was developed by Thomas R. Bruce, co-founder and director of Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute. Tom Bruce is a giant in the very small world of legal education technology.

Business First: Book of Lists

Ever wonder what the current top Louisville law firms are? Or whether they are employing more lawyers than last year? The quickest way to answer those questions is to consult Business First of Louisville’s Book of Lists, an annual compilation of the weekly industry rankings in Louisville’s premier source of business news, and a resource currently available from the University of Louisville Libraries.

Go to UoL's Databases List. Next, choose “B” then Business First Louisville.  That will take you to the forty-odd local business newspapers in the BizLink database.  Louisville’s Business First is located in the highlighted box at the top of the page. Links there allow you to search for articles, view whole recent issues, or look at the most recent Book of Lists.  If you follow that last link, it will take you to the 2012 edition of the BOL. The Top Law Firms table (first released on Dec 28, 2012) is found on page 18 of the printed version, or by entering 24 into the search box online.

For more tips like these, visit the Law Library News for Faculty Archives.

UofL Law Professor Jamie Abrams Weighs in on Proposition 8

Brandeis School of Law Assistant Professor Jamie Abrams joined 37 professors of family law and constitutional law in an amicus brief filed in the United States Supreme Court in Hollingsworth v. Perry. Professor Abrams is one of many Brandeis faculty members influencing legal matters of national importance.


Commonly known as the "Prop 8" case, Oral Arguments are being heard Tuesday, March 26.

Read the brief to which Professor Abrams contributed, or follow the activity on this high profile, nationally significant case at SCOTUSblog.

University of Louisville Law Review Selected to Host National Conference of Law Reviews in 2015

The University of Louisville Law Review is pleased to announce that it has been selected to host the 61st Annual National Conference of Law Reviews in March 2015. The conference allows law journal editors from throughout the nation to gather to exchange ideas and experiences about issues common to student-edited publications. Conference attendees also have the opportunity to hear from the foremost members of the legal community, meet with publishing and other service vendors, and socialize with a diverse group of law review editors from across the United States. Between 250 and 350 student editors attend the conference each year.

This announcement follows a successful week for the Law Review at this year's conference at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, where it was recognized for best practices and innovation in editing. The Law Review presented to an audience of approximately 80 representatives of journals from throughout the nation about steps taken this year to improve the efficiency of the editing process. Following the presentation, at least 25 journals expressed direct interest in at least partially modeling their editing procedures and organizational structure after the University of Louisville Law Review. The presentation will be published in this year's NCLR Best Practices Manual, which will be distributed to hundreds of law journals throughout the country.

This is a big win for the Law Review, the law school and the Louisville community. The Law Review is honored to be selected to host the conference and looks forward to welcoming editors from throughout the nation to Louisville in March 2015.

Louisville Ranks Among the Best Cities

Louisville residents have known for quite some time that Louisville is one of the best places to live.

Now 2 different organizations are recognizing Louisville's outstanding qualities.

 

Lonely Planet, the online travel guide, named Louisville its number 1 travel destination for 2013. They describe Louisville as "a lively, offbeat cultural mecca on the Ohio River" and cite its youthful population as one of its best assets.

Also recognizing Louisville's greatness is the Web site Under30CEO, which listed Louisville as their 2013 Number 3 best city for young entrepenurs. Of special note is the impact Louisville's universities have on the city's entrepeneurial potential. According to the Kauffman Foundation in 2011 Louisville outperformed the nation in being home to fast growth companies and was among the top states in the nation in terms of new start-up companies formed.

 

T. Kennedy Helm Remembered

Kennedy Helm, chairman at Stites & Harbison and longtime attorney for the Louisville Regional Airport Authority, passed away on Friday, March 15.

Law school Interim Dean, Susan Duncan, remembers him as a giant in Louisville. 

Helm was instrumental in the development of the Lively Wilson Oral Advocacy Program at Brandeis School of Law. He invested his time and was a major supporter of law school diversity efforts. Helm had a keen interest in history and education and strongly supported the Central High School Partnership with Brandeis School of Law.

You may read more about Kennedy Helm at the Courier-Journal.

 

A memorial service for Mr. Helm will take place at 11 a.m., Saturday, April 13, 2013, at Christ Church Cathedral, 421 South 2nd St. Arrangements are under the direction of Pearson's. 

Roofs Around Campus are Looking Up!

Without question anyone traveling through the oval on UofL's Belknap campus has seen the glint of new copper roofs going up on Grawmeyer Hall and Brandeis School of Law.

Urgent repairs to prevent water damage to the buildings started immediately after the hail storm in April, 2012. Besides the roofing material, such things as skylights, windows and rooftop equipment also sustained damage.

Read more about the repais to many damaged structures around campus at UofL Today.

Kentucky Congressman John Yarmuth Visits Brandeis Law

On Friday, February 22, Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3) and Professor Neil Kinkopf, of the Georgia State University College of Law, joined Brandeis School of Law students and attorneys from the community for a reasonable conversation about gun control. The event ran a full two hours and every seat was full.

Professor Kinkopf spoke first about the constitutionality of pending gun control legislation. His analysis provided a concise interpretation of the Second Amendment and D.C. v. Heller and predicted that the laws posed no danger of overstepping congressional powers.

Congressman Yarmuth gave insight into the details of the pending measures. He explained his support for laws implementing universal background checks and restrictions on ammunition magazine capacity. The Congressman's remarks were personal and genuine and set the floor for an open and civil discourse amongst the attendees.

After both speakers' remarks, the discussion shifted to questions representing varied perspectives on the topic from those in attendance.

The timing of the event was particularly momentous due to the national spotlight that has been focused on the Congressman regarding his remarks on gun control and the NRA. This program successfully fostered a respectful and productive dialogue on a very polarizing and controversial topic. The event was organized and sponsored by the UofL Louis D. Brandeis School of Law Student Chapter and the Kentucky Lawyer Chapter of the American Constitution Society.

 

Yarmuth Discussion

Professor Kinkopf and Congressman Yarmuth are joined by Brandeis Law Professor Luke Milligan during questions and answers session at the event.