Faculty News

ABA Annual Student Writing Competition

The KBA invites and encourages students currently enrolled at the University of Kentucky College of Law, the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, and the Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law to enter the KBA Annual Student Writing Competition. This competition offers these Kentucky legal scholars the opportunity to earn recognition and a cash award. First ($1,000); second ($300), and third place ($200) prizes may be awarded. Entries must be received by June 1, 2014. The first place prize also includes possible publication in the Bench & Bar.

Students may enter their previously unpublished articles. Articles entered should be of interest to Kentucky practitioners and follow the suggested guidelines and requirements found in the “General Format” section of the Bench & Bar Editorial Guidelines at www.kybar.org/103. For inquiries concerning the KBA Annual Student Writing Competition, contact Shannon H. Roberts at sroberts@kybar.org or call (502) 564-3795 ext. 224. Submit entries with contact information to Shannon H. Roberts, Communications Department, Kentucky Bar Association, 514 W. Main Street, Frankfort, KY 40601-1812.

Resource Center Closed 1 - 4 Today

The Resource Center, as well as many offices, will be closed today from 1 to 4 p.m. for Professor Render's funeral service.

In Memoriam of Professor Ed Render

We are deeply saddened to report that Professor Render passed away on Saturday, January 4, at Baptist East Hospital after a short battle with cancer.  A funeral service celebrating his life will be held on January 8 at St. Mark's Episcopal Church.  Memorial gifts may be made to the Edwin R. Render Scholarship Fund at the Law School.  Professor Render was a good, compassionate person  who positively affected countless people in his 45+ years at the Law School.  He will be greatly missed by many.

You can read the complete obituary here:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/louisville/obituary.aspx?n=edwin-r-render&pid=168897210&fhid=2936110&fhid=29361.

 

Law School Closed Monday, January 6

Due to severe weather, offices will be closed and classes canceled on Monday, January 6, 2014.

 

Recent Bar Publications

Here's a review of recent local publications from the Louisville and Kentucky Bar Associations.

Highlights from the Louisville Bar Association's January 2014 Bar Briefs include:

  • "Brandeis Professors Travel The World" (page 6)
  • "LBA Adopts Human Rights Law Section" by A. Holland Houston, '94 (page 7)
  • "Congratluations to the LBA's 2013 Leadership Academy" picturing Louisville Law alums (page 10)
  • "2013 LBA Award Recipients" featuring Louisville Law alums (page 17)
  • "Members on the move" (page 24)
  • "Crisscross Law: Courts and the Constitution" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 21)
"Spotlight on UofL's Intellectual Property and Business Law Education" is the focus of Dean Susan Duncan's report in the Decemer 2013 issue of the Bar Briefs. The faculty expertise of Professors Cross, Ensign, Nicholson, Smith, are Warren are noted. Her report also mentions the success of the Entrepreneurship Cinic's participation in the Global Venture Labs Investment Competition and recent moot court competitions.

More highlights from the December 2013 Bar Briefs:
  • "The Old Man of the Internet: Thomas.gov and the Promise of Online Legislative Research Fulfilled" by Professor Kurt Metzmeier (page 15)
  • "The Fractious Federal Circuit: The Federal Circuit Has Lost its Unifying Mojo; Will That Doom  Computer-Based Patents?" by James R. Higgins Jr., '78 (page 10)
  • "Potential Pitfalls in Taking a Patent Assignment at Face Value" by Scott W. Higdon, '08 (page 18)
  • "Going Solo? Be Prepared" by Bryan R. Armstrong, '07 (page 23)
  • "Crisscross Law: Technology & IP" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 25)
  • "Members on the move" (page 28)
In the November 2013 Bench & Bar issue, Dean Duncan reports about Justice Brandeis' earliest memories of his mother serving Union soldiers on the front lawn. Fittingly, the anniversary of his birth was celebrated on Veteran's Day this past year. Her report goes on to include the military's importance and impact on the law school throughout its history and concludes with a photograph of the law school's newest student veterans.

More highlights from the November 2013 Bench & Bar:
  • "A Place to Begin for Advising on Cloud Computing: Thomas Shaw's Cloud Computing for Lawyers and Executives: A Global Approach, 2nd Ed., ABA Publishing" by Michael Losavio, Assistant Professor of Justice Administration at UofL (page 23)
  • "On the Move" (page 60)
Both publications are available in the law library.

Journal of Animal and Environmental Law Publishes Fall Issue

The Journal of Animal and Environmental Law is pleased to announce the publication of Issue One of Volume 5

The issue features two articles and one student authored note.

 

Articles:

The Raft of Medusa: Why Clean Up is Not the Answer to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch 

By: Kristin W.E.M. De Han 

 

Good Things Come to Those Who Wait: Cites and the Move Toward Legalizing the International Trade in Ivory

By: Megan Foley

 

Note:

Emphasizing the Link: Kentucky Needs to Enact Cross-Reporting Statutes to Combat All Forms of Abuse. 

By: Sierra Elizabeth Ashby

 

Thanks to all JAEL members for their hard work throughout the semester, as well as faculty advisors Professor Cross and Abrams, who helped make publication possible!

Building Closed December 17

The Law School and Law Library will be closed Tuesday, December 17, due to off-site training for faculty and staff.  We will re-open December 18 and will close for the holidays December 24 through January 1, 2014.

 

Donate to the Law Library

To become a premier metropolitan research university, the University of Louisville has initiated a bold campaign to raise an unprecedented $1 Billion in private support by 2013. You may now designate your Fund for UofL gift to the school, college or library of your choice. Your tax-deductible gift benefits the area you choose and counts toward the Charting Our Course: The Campaign for Kentucky's Premier Metropolitan Research University.

Contributors may now support the University and the Law School by donating to the Law Library. Your gift will be used to buy books, furnishings, or equipment that will directly benefit students, faculty, and other patrons.

  1. Complete the Charting Our Course: Fund for UofL online giving form.
  2. Under Designations, check Other and enter "Law Library Gift Fund."

Your gift is very much appreciated!


Bob Heleringer on David J. Leibson in Courier-Journal

David Leibson's UofL Law Retirement Leaves Void

 

Please note: Grace M. Giesel is the Bernard Flexner Professor of Law – not Professor Leibson – as the article states.

Professor Leibson Shares Parting Thoughts About His Time at the Law School, Retirement

Professor David J. Leibson wanted to pursue a teaching career from a young age. But even he could not have envisioned what was to follow and what he would accomplish during a 40-plus-year distinguished tenure at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law—the law school from which he graduated first in his class in 1969. 

“If someone would’ve told me in law school that I would end up being a so-called expert on the Uniform Commercial Code, I would’ve told them that they were crazy,” Leibson said. “That’s why I tell my students to never rule out anything as an opportunity.”

After Leibson was encouraged to become a teacher by his mentor and professor Bob Birkby while an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University, Leibson’s opportunity to finally enter academia arrived in 1971. Former Dean of UofL’s law school James Merritt unexpectedly called Leibson, then an associate handling mostly personal injury cases at Leibson & Franklin, PSC, to become a part-time professor; however, rather than teaching a subject for which he already had a strong interest, like Torts or Evidence, he would be teaching a Secured Transactions class.

As it turned out, Leibson enjoyed teaching the class and eventually parlayed his part-time position into a full-time teaching position for the 1972–73 academic year. Within ten years, Leibson, previously unmoved by the wonders of the UCC, was approached by a publisher to author what would later become the first edition of The Uniform Commercial Code of Kentucky. The project was too massive for one person to handle so he recruited a rookie law professor at the time, Richard Nowka—the current Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs Professor of Law—to help pen the work.
 
“We wrote that book more than 30 years ago and that’s way too long for my recollection of highlights,” said Nowka, one of Leibson’s friends and colleagues on the faculty. “But I do recall how grateful I was that he asked me, a first-year teacher, to be a co-author with him on a book.” 

The book was well-received by the bench, bar, and Leibson’s students, who represent the part of his job that Leibson will miss the most.

“I will definitely miss the intellectual challenge of the classroom because I know our students here are as intelligent and creative as anywhere else.” said Leibson, whose oft-quoted saying “What would your mother say?” reminded his students and challenged them to focus not only on the subtleties of precise statutory language, but also to look at the common sense behind Code provisions.

Leibson’s dedication to his students prompted, in part, his decision to retire. He did not want to transform, as he witnessed with some of his peers, into a shell of his former self, unable to muster the same level of passion and enthusiasm that he expects to bring to the classroom. 

Aside from the Code classes he teaches, Leibson, an avid reader, is extremely passionate and enthusiastic about his Law & Literature Seminar, which he said would now be the one class that could sway him into getting that itch to return from retirement.
 
Third-year law student Michael Atkinson, enrolled in Leibson’s Negotiable Instruments and Law & Literature classes this semester, spoke particularly highly of the seminar: “There was one class where [Professor Leibson] made a suggestion based on one of our readings, and I disagreed with the merits of his suggestion, but he didn't shoot me down; rather, he respected my opinion and contributions to the discussion. The class, and the way he conducted it, was truly a model for civil discourse.”

Leibson said that his teaching methodology is driven by the way students are responding in the class and that he learned, over time, not to judge students too quickly, as each person thrives and learns differently depending on the circumstances. Despite the progressive integration of technology and distance learning in higher education, Leibson prefers face-to-face discussions with his students—whether to assist in understanding the material or simply getting to find out a little bit more about who they are. 

Now, one topic of discussion is what Leibson will do in his retirement. Expecting to be unable to decide exactly what to do for at least the first six months, Leibson and his wife, Phyllis, will likely devote some time to their love of traveling; with Leibson having previously served as a visiting Professor of Law at the University of Western Sydney, Australia is one of the couple’s favorite destinations.

Restoring his (once-impressive) handicap on the links to respectability and finally being able to delve into the stack of books by his bed are also on the to-do list for the professor when he leaves his post at the law school after finals (and his celebratory roast and retirement party!) are over.  

For as much knowledge as Leibson has imparted upon his pupils throughout the years, he maintains that they returned the favor on a daily basis.

“After all this time, you learn a lot about life and your work, not only because of yourself, but from the students themselves,” Leibson said.