Faculty News

Photo Gallery: Diversity Forum

On Tuesday, September 28, the Diversity Committee hosted three distinguished speakers: Kentucky Supreme Court Associate Justice Lisa Abramson, Judge Denise Clayton, and Louisville NAACP President Raoul Cunningham. The distinguished panelists discussed, "The Importance of Diversity in the Judiciary".

The first program in our Fall 2010 Diversity Forum Series was moderated by Jamie Izlar, 3L, and sponsored by the Black Law Students Association, Lambda Law Caucus, and the Women's Law Caucus.

Photo Gallery

 

Law School Welcomes Distinguished Scholar in Law and Public Policy

The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law welcomes Christopher Slobogin as its Fall 2010 Distinguished Scholar in Law and Public Policy.  Professor Slobogin is the Milton Underwood Chair in Law, Professor of Psychiatry, and Director of the Criminal Justice Program at Vanderbilt University.  He will give a faculty workshop on September 30 on "The Future of the Fourth Amendment."  Each semester, the Law School identifies a nationally renowned scholar in law and public policy to give a workshop as part of its Faculty Workshop Series, enhancing the exchange of ideas and intellectual inquiry at the Law School, particularly at the intersetion of law and public policy.

The Importance of Diversity in the Judiciary

 

On Tuesday, September 28, at noon in Room 275 the Diversity Committee hosts three distinguished speakers: Kentucky Supreme Court Associate Justice Lisa Abramson, Judge Denise Clayton, Louisville NAACP President Raoul Cunningham for the next program in our Diversity Forum Series.

Moderator: Jamie Izlar.

Co-sponsors: Black Law Students Association; Lambda Law Caucus; Women's Law Caucus.

Free light lunch available at 11:30. Open to all. 

 

Lawlaplooza Tickets, T-shirts and More

Tickets and t-shirts are on sale now in the Law Resource Center (room 272, across from 275).

Tickets cost $5 for students (including spouses, partners, boyfriends, girlfriends, etc.) and $20 for general admission. They’ll also be available at the door.

T-shirts are $10. BONUS: Students who purchase a t-shirt and wear it to the show will also receive their first drink free, compliments of Westlaw!

We hope to see you at Lawlapalooza 2010 on September 30th for an evening of great music and great fun for a great cause, and be sure to bring plenty of cash to vote for your favorite band!

What Is Lawlapalooza?

Lawlapalooza is a full-on, no-holds-barred, Texas-steel-cage, loser-leave-town Battle of the Bands featuring Louisville attorneys (and occasionally law students), rocking out to raise money for a great cause. Proceeds from Lawlapalooza benefit the Judge Ellen B. Ewing Foundation, which provides local summer fellowships for University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law students to work in the areas of family law, domestic violence and spouse abuse, and HIV/AIDS. Ewing Fellowships are awarded under the Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Program.

Lawlapalooza began in 2005 in collaboration with the Jefferson County Women Lawyers Association, and to date has raised over $25,000 and provided invaluable practice experience for four Ewing Fellows.

Lawlapalooza 2010 will be held Thursday, September 30th at the Phoenix Hill Tavern, 644 Baxter Avenue. Doors open at 6:00 PM, and the first band takes the stage at 6:30. Both new and returning bands will perform, featuring attorneys from:

  • Greenebaum Doll McDonald
  • Stoll Keenon Ogden
  • Borowitz & Goldsmith
  • Fultz Maddox Hovious & Dickens
  • Clay Frederick Adams, and
  • Brandeis School of Law*
*Professors Tim Hall and Lars Smith and Assistant Dean Jim Becker will be performing, along with Professor Hall’s wife, Stephanie, as The Subconscionables.

The bands’ musical styles this year range from “funky bluegrass” to country to rock and blues, and each will perform a 20-minute set. Fans vote for their favorite band by throwing money in their tip jar. The band with the most money in its jar at the end of the night wins a trophy and bragging rights until next year.

This year, Lawlapalooza will be hosted by law students Alex White and Jennifer Siewertsen, our 2010 Ewing Fellow, who spent her summer working in the Legal Aid Society of Louisville’s Family Law Unit.

Tickets, T-shirts and More

Tickets and t-shirts are on sale now in the Law Resource Center (room 272, across from 275).

Tickets cost $5 for students (including spouses, partners, boyfriends, girlfriends, etc.) and $20 for general admission. They’ll also be available at the door.

T-shirts are $10 and will also be on sale Tuesday, September 21, from 5:15-7:15 PM, and Wednesday, September 22nd, from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM, in the Mosaic Lobby. Available sizes now are L and XL, but we’ve ordered more and expect to have S, M and 2XL by the end of this week.

BONUS: Students who purchase a t-shirt and wear it to the show will also receive their first drink free, compliments of Westlaw!

We hope to see you at Lawlapalooza 2010 on September 30th for an evening of great music and great fun for a great cause, and be sure to bring plenty of cash to vote for your favorite band!

Constitution Day Commemoration


Barry Faulkner, The Constitution
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

United States Constitution, preamble



[W]e must never forget that it is a constitution we are expounding.

McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 316, 407 (1819)



Constitution

The United States Constitution is not only the basic law of the United States. It has also inspired politicians, philosophers, and ordinary people around the world. Scholars have devoted intense attention to the Constitution, its interpretation by the Supreme Court of the United States, and its impact on the American people.

Constitutional law forms an important part of the Law School's curriculum and research agenda. University of Louisville faculty members have devoted considerable attention to the Constitution, its interpretation, and its social meaning. Lawyers with diverse practices and specializations share a background in constitutional law, which in turn unites the practicing bar in a common civil culture based on the Constitution and its role in American history and politics.

The Law School therefore takes great pride in presenting an annual commemoration of Constitution Day on behalf of the entire University of Louisville. This year's program consists of a collection of videos that provide commentary on recent developments in the Supreme Court of the United States and in lower federal courts. Jim Chen, Samuel Marcosson, Luke Milligan, Laura Rothstein and Joseph Tomain review a significant year of developments in American constitutional law.

2010 Constitution Day Program

  • Luke M. Milligan, Introduction
  • Jim Chen, McDonald v. City of Chicago: The States and the 2nd Amendment
  • Samuel A. Marcosson, The California Same-Sex Marriage Case
  • Luke M. Milligan, City of Ontario v. Quon
  • Laura Rothstein, Christian Legal Society v. Martinez
  • Joseph A. Tomain, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

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Additional resources:


Legal notice: This page is composed in compliance with section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2004, Pub. L. No. 108-447, § 111, 118 Stat. 2809, 3344-45 (2004), more colloquially known as the "Constitution Day" statute. See also Notice of Implementation of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on September 17 of Each Year, 70 Fed. Reg. 29,727 (May 24, 2005).

Section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act states in relevant part: "Each educational institution that receives Federal funds for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on September 17 of such year for the students served by the educational institution." Section 111 further requires that Constitution Day be commemorated on September 17, in honor of the day in 1787 on which the Constitution was signed. In a year in which September 17 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, Constitution Day may be commemorated during the preceding or following week.

20 Minutes with Tracey Roberts

Tracey Roberts, assistant professor at the Brandeis School of Law, is new to Louisville and to the University of Louisville.

She's started a group called Louisville Faculty and Friends to help newcomers connect with other people in the community. UofL Today recently asked her about the group and herself.

UofL Today: Last year, you were a research affiliate with Vanderbilt University's Climate Change Research Network and held a fellowship with the Searle-Kauffman Institute for Law, Innovation and Growth. Before that, you practiced law in Georgia and Colorado. What brought you to Louisville?

Roberts: I have always wanted to teach law. At the University of Louisville, I feel that I am in a position to make an important contribution through my research and teaching to both academia and (hopefully) generations of students, attorneys and policy-makers. It is particularly gratifying to be doing this work back in my home state. I am originally from Franklin, Ky., a small town along the southern border, south of Bowling Green. I was also a member of the Kentucky Bar for nine years, though I practiced law elsewhere.

UofL Today: What is Louisville Faculty & Friends?

Roberts: Louisville Faculty & Friends is a social group designed to integrate faculty into the broader Louisville community, provide informational resources to newcomers, encourage cross-disciplinary and public-private collaboration, and generally have fun in Louisville and surrounds.

UofL Today: How can people get involved?

Roberts: Everyone should feel free to join our Louisville Faculty & Friends Google group.

Full Story: "20 Minutes with Tracey Roberts on faculty newcomer group" (UofL Today, September 14, 2010)

 

Thursday! Thursday! Thursday!

Lawlapalooza 2010 t-shirts and tickets will be on sale in the Mosaic Lobby ...

  • Thursday, September 16 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm,
  • Tuesday, September 21 from 5:15 to 7:15 pm, and
  • Wednesday, September 22 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm.

T-shirts are $10. Student tickets are $5, and general admission tickets are $20.

Bonus: Every student who wears his/her Lawlapalaooza 2010 t-shirt to the show, Thursday, September 30 at the Phoenix Hill Tavern, gets his/her first drink FREE, compliments of Westlaw.

Enjoy the Lawlapalooza 2010 Commercial:

September Bar Briefs

Here are some highlights from the September 2010 issue of the Louisville Bar Association's Bar Briefs publication.
  • "Ethics and Elder Law" by Bernard M. Faller, '01 (p. 1)
  • "From the President's Desk: Freedom Sings" by Laurel S. Doheny, '92 (p. 3)
  • "Notes from the Wasteland: All I Really Need to Know About Law, I Learned from ABC's Prime-time Schedule" by Jim Chen (p. 6)
  • "Avoiding the Weary Time: Expediting Claims with the Use of On the Record Requests" by Gregory T. Schmidt, '03, and Jaime L. Patterson, '08 (p. 11)
A copy is available in the library's reserves.

Profile of Ellen B. Ewing Fellow

Jennifer Siewertsen, 2L, shares her experience as the 2010 Ellen B. Ewing Fellow.

As a first year law student the law seemed like an intangible idea, an abstract thought presented in casebooks and lectures. The cases and the discussions have names and titles, but not faces or stories. For someone propelled into law with a background in social justice and advocacy, this pursuit of a faceless justice left a lot to be desired. I never imagined that in ten short weeks, my purpose and interest in the law would be renewed and redirected towards family law.

As the 2010 Ellen Ewing Fellow I was thrust headfirst into Legal Aid’s Family Law Unit. Working with a small and dedicated group of people, I worked with a variety of complex family and legal issues. I immediately began meeting clients and sifting through cases. What I found wasn’t a question presented or an issue, but individual people struggling to find safety for themselves and their children from domestic abuse. What may have been another day at the office for me was often a life-changing moment in the life of a client.

I spent the summer doing many of the same duties as any other law clerk, researching, writing, and observing in court. However, what I got out of the experience was wholly unique. The opportunity to interact with clients on a personal level and see legal issues through a human lens has given me a renewed sense of purpose for this upcoming school year. Though my time spent with the Legal Aid Society as the Ellen Ewing fellow was brief, the impact of that experience will be life-long.

Ms. Siewertsen is a native of Louisville, Kentucky and a 2008 Graduate of Centre College with a Bachelor’s in Religion as well as Government. She's active on the 2010 National Moot Court Team and the Moot Court Board as well as a candidate for membership in the Journal of Law and Education. She was a runner-up in the 2010 First Year Appellate Advocacy Competition (pictured above).

Jennifer and her classmate, Alex White, will emcee Lawalapalooza on September 30 at Phoenix Hill Tavern.