Faculty News

Professor Jim Jones Spotlighted by ABA Commission on Disability Rights

The American Bar Association Commission on Disability Rights has recognized Professor James T.R. Jones for his professional accomplishments while combatting bipolar disorder life-long.  Since publicly disclosing his illness in 2007, and describing it in his 2011 memoir, A Hidden Madness, Professor Jones has become an advocate for others in the legal profession who also struggle with mental illness and its stigma.

Read the full profile of Professor Jones and learn more about his moving story. 

Prof. Lewis' Dec. Estates cancelled Monday only

Professor Lewis's Decedents' Estates class is cancelled today, Monday, October 14.  Class will be held on Wednesday.

Law Resource Center Hours - Oct. 14-18

Law Resource Center Hours - Oct. 14-18, 2013

Monday-Thursday - 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Friday - 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

 

 

Public health, law schools to host forum on HIV, criminal prosecutions

HIV criminalization refers to criminal statutes that apply only to people with HIV, and the sometimes heightened sentences people with the disease face in court. This is a topic of concern among public health organizations and HIV policy leaders.

In an effort to join the conversation, the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences and the UofL Louis D. Brandeis School of Law will host a free public forum Oct. 2 at the Louisville Metro Department of Health and Wellness, 400 E. Gray St.

“The degree to which we as a community accept diversity goes a long way in determining our collective quality of life,” said UofL School of Public Health and Information Sciences Dean Craig Blakely. “Part of the university’s mission is to provide teachable moments, and this forum provides an educational opportunity to stimulate discussion about a complex topic that impacts subsets of our community differently.”

Kentucky Department for Public Health HIV/AIDS Program Branch Manager Karen Sams and UofL law professor Samuel A. Marcosson will provide the health and legal context of this multi-faceted issue.

“Social justice is the cornerstone of our law school,” said Susan Duncan, Dean of the Brandeis School of Law. “That’s one of the reasons we are especially pleased to contribute to this important forum, and we want to do our part to help the public better understand what it means to be HIV positive.”

Speakers also will include organizers of the Sero Project, Sean Strub and Robert Suttle. Strub will discuss his perspective on HIV criminalization and why he advocates for reform, while Suttle will share his personal story of prosecution and incarceration on a nondisclosure charge in Louisiana. His story is portrayed in the short film HIV is Not a Crime, which will be shown the night of the forum.

LGBT Center Director and Assistant Provost for Diversity Brian Buford said Pride Week, UofL’s celebration of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, is a great time to engage in these conversations.

“The idea that people with HIV can face criminal charges for how and when they disclose their status may come as a surprise to many, even some in the LGBT community—that is why it’s important to host a public dialogue. The awareness of threats can be the catalyst for improvement,” Buford said.

The forum begins with a reception at 5:30p.m., followed by presentations at 6 p.m. Other event partners are the UofL LGBT Center, the Graduate Program in Bioethics & Medical Humanities, the ACLU of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign.

Source: UofL Today (September 26, 2013)

Law School to co-host forum on HIV, criminal prosecutions

HIV criminalization refers to criminal statutes that apply only to people with HIV, and the sometimes heightened sentences people with the disease face in court. This is a topic of concern among public health organizations and HIV policy leaders.

In an effort to join the conversation, the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences and the Law School will host a free public forum at 5:30 on Oct. 2 at the Louisville Metro Department of Health and Wellness, 400 E. Gray St.

Kentucky Department for Public Health HIV/AIDS Program Branch Manager Karen Sams and Professor Sam Marcosson will provide the health and legal context of this multi-faceted issue. 

 

Diversity Forum – Tuesday, October 22 @ Noon in Room 275

The Black Law Students Association and the Diversity Committee invite everyone to our October 22 forum, Before “Bombingham” and Beyond Trayvon. Speakers will include Prof. Enid Trucios-Haynes and Mr. Anthony Smith, Director of Safe Neighborhoods (a position recommended by the city’s violence prevention task force last year). Prof. Laura McNeal will moderate the program.

A free, light lunch will be available in the hall outside of Room 275 @11:45 a.m.

Windows 8 User Best Practice

Windows 8 users please be aware that the Internet Explorer app available on the Start screen is not the same as the Internet Explorer program (IE) available through the Desktop. The Desktop version of IE is sometimes required for certain web-based programs to work correctly like Ulink, Blackboard, and Tegrity. To avoid lost work and confusion the best practice is to use the IE program via the Desktop and not the app for student related work.

Law school kitchen gets extreme makeover

Change is good. Especially when it’s long overdue.

That’s the prevailing attitude among faculty, staff and students at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law when it comes to the school’s recent kitchen makeover.

Located on the lower level of the school, the sorely outdated kitchen had not been modernized for decades.

"It was disgusting," said law school Dean Susan Duncan. "The kitchen was the exact same as when I was in law school here in the 1980s. It definitely needed a makeover."

But with budgets exceedingly tight, the kitchen didn’t get remodeled until a donor stepped up to fund the project.


At right, Richard Edwards and law Dean Susan Duncan talk to students in the newly remodeled kitchen.


Richard Edwards, managing partner with Louisville-based law firm Boehl, Stopher & Graves, LLC, provided funds to refurbish the kitchen with new floors, cabinets, paint and appliances. His law firm partner, Ed Stopher, also contributed to the kitchen makeover.

Law school faculty member Linda Ewald also contributed to pay for the industrial size refrigerator.

When Edwards was asked why his firm decided to fund such an unusual project, he said he hoped to make the overall environment more enjoyable for students.

"I wanted to do something that went beyond academics—something to give students a pleasant little break from their studies," said Edwards.

His plan seems to be working well. On any given day, dozens of students use the kitchen and, during lunchtime, nearly every chair is occupied.

While the makeover dramatically transformed the room, one feature remained unchanged: a large, colorful wall mural of school namesake Louis D. Brandeis.

"It’s the only thing in the kitchen that we didn’t want to change," said Duncan.

Cappuccino, Baby!

The Law School has received the opportunity to be a “test” for a free-standing coffee-cappuccino machine. The machine will be located between the soda machines in the basement. There are 26 flavors to choose from and we need your help in deciding which flavor coffees and cappuccinos you would like to see offered. Please complete and submit this survey (ULink login required) no later than 11:59 p.m., Friday, September 13, 2013.

Input from students, staff and faculty is welcome!

Professor Laura McNeal discusses legacy of Charles Hamilton Houston at Harvard Law School

This year, we have seen the Supreme Court drastically reduce the protections of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, even as we observe the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington. Despite the tremendous efforts to promote equal education opportunity, many of our public schools remain segregated and many students are raised in impoverished households. The influence of race and poverty on academic achievement are undeniable. On September 5, Professor Laura McNeal will serve on a panel at Harvard Law School with three other distinguished panelists to both reflect on Charles Hamilton Houston's powerful legacy and to assess how we can draw upon that legacy to address the considerable legal challenges to equal opportunity in America.