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Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

 

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Professor Nicholson speaking at Texas A&M's Access to Justice event

Professor Lisa Nicholson has two speaking engagements coming up. She is an invited speaker and panelist for an event titled "Access to Justice as Access to Lawyers? Reconsidering Access to Justice," hosted by Texas A&M University School of Law from April 30 through May 2.

Additionally, Professor Nicholson will be a panelist for a session titled, "Ownership and Control: New Considerations on Litigation, Governance, Structures, and Shareholder Activism," hosted by Law and Society in Seattle on May 30. 

 

Exam4 Advisory: Mac Typing Lag

The IT Department received an advisory from Extegrity late afternoon, Tuesday, April 21 about Mac users experiencing a noticeable lag in typing when:

  1. The student has typed a substantial amount of text, and
  2. The document statistics window is turned on.

The Workaround:
Turn the document statistics window on only to check your progress, then turn it off again. Remember, there is a dedicated button for this purpose just to the right of the typing space.

If you experience this issue, please report it to the IT staff so we may confirm the incidence rate and effectiveness of the solution to Extegrity. Good luck on your finals!

Student volunteers can attend Warns-Render Institute for free

The annual Warns-Render Institute, a labor and employment law CLE, will be held June 11 & 12 at the Seelbach downtown. This is a terrific opportunity to hear national speakers and to network with local attorneys.  Students who work the event, doing jobs such as validating parking, greeting moderators and speakers, taking photos, circulating microphones, or keeping time, are able to attend one or both days for free. You can find more information on the Law School’s events web page. 

If you are interested in attending, please notify Tracie Cole, tlcole01@exchange.louisville.edu, and Professor Levinson, a.levinson@louisville.edu, via email.  Please include which day or days you are interested in attending and tell us if there are particular jobs you would be well-suited for.

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Library Student Workers Honored

Several of the law library's student workers were honored at the recent Awards and Leadership Recognition Program. Kudos to Matthew Dutcher, Alex Russell and Bailey Schrupp! Congratulations are also extended to former faculty research assistant, Kimberly Balkcom, former student worker, Kseniya Medova Buck, and future student worker, Corey Music!

Pictured left to right with Dean Duncan:  Kimberly, Kseniya, Corey, Matthew and Bailey

  • Kimberly Balkcom, 3L: Carl A. Warns, Jr. Award, Journal of Law and Education (Articles Editor)
  • Kseniya Medova Buck, 2L: Top Grades During 2014 (Human Rights in the Digital Era), American Bar Association Arbitration Competition (Team Member & Facilitator), Transactional Law Meet Competition (Team Member), Student Bar Association (2L Class Representative)
  • Matthew Dutcher, 2L: Journal of Animal and Environmental Law (Member), Student Bar Association (Technology Chair)
  • Corey Music, 1L: Top Grades During 2014 (Criminal Law)
  • Alex Russell, 3L: American Bar Association Negotiation Competition (Team Member)
  • Bailey Schrupp, 3L: Journal of Animal and Environmental Law (Notes Editor)