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Certificates from Awards Program

Students who were not present for the Awards Program on April 1, may pick up their certificates from the Academic Success Office, Room 212. 

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Making Time When There Seems to be None

A common theme in my discussion with students is that there are not enough hours in the day.  At this point in the semester, many students are starting to get stressed over the amount of work to fit into the amount of time left in the semester.  It can seem overwhelming if one does not use good time management skills.  Here are some tips:

  • Realize that you control your time.  With intentional behavior, you can take control of the remainder of the semester rather than feeling as though it is a roller coaster ride. Make time for what really matters.
  • Work for progress in every course.  If you focus on one course to the detriment of the other courses, it creates a cycle of catch-up and stress.  Space out work on a major assignment over the days available and continue with daily work in all other courses.
  • Use small pockets of time for small tasks.  Even 15 minutes can be used effectively!  Small amounts of time are useful for memory drills with flashcards or through rule recitation out loud.  Twenty minutes can be used to review class notes and begin to condense the material for an outline.  Thirty minutes can be used for a few multiple-choice practice questions or to review a sub-topic for a course.
  • Capture wasted time and consolidate it.  Students often waste up to an hour at a time chatting with friends, playing computer games,  watching You Tube, answering unimportant e-mails, and more.  Look for time that can be used more productively.  If several wasted blocks of time during a day can be re-captured and consolidated into a longer block, a great deal can be accomplished!  
  • Use windfall time well.  It is not unusual in a day to benefit from unexpected blocks of time that could be used.  A professor lets the class out early.  A study group meets for less time than expected.  An appointment with a professor is shorter than scheduled.  Rather than consider the time as free time, use it for a study task.
  • Realize the power of salvaged blocks of time.  If you capture a half hour of study time a day, that is 3.5 extra hours per week.  An hour per day adds up to 7 hours per week.  Time suddenly is there that seemed to be unavailable.
  • Break down exam review into sub-topics.  You may not be able to find time to review the entire topic of easements intensely, but you can likely find time to review its first element intensely.  By avoiding the "all or nothing mentality" in exam review,  progress is made in smaller increments.  It still gets the job done!
  • Evaluate your priorities and use of time three times a day.  Every morning look at your tasks for the day and evaluate the most effective and efficient ways to accomplish everything.  Schedule when you will get things done during the day.  Do the same thing at lunch time and make any necessary changes.  Repeat the exercise at dinner time.
  • Cut out the non-essentials in life.  Save shopping for shoes for that August wedding until after exams.  Stock up on non-perishable food staples now rather than shop for them every week.  Run errands in a group now and get it over with to allow concentrating on studies for the rest of the semester.
  • Exercise in appropriate amounts.  If you are an exercise fanatic spending more than 7 hours a week on workouts, it is time to re-prioritize.  You may have the best abs among law students at your school, but you need to workout your brain cells at this point in the semester.
  • Boost your brain power in the time you have.  Sleep at least 7 hours a night.  Eat nutritional meals.  Your brain cells will be able to do the academic heavy lifting in less time if you do these simple things.

So, take a deep breath.  Take control of your time.  And good luck with the remainder of the semester.  Adapated from a post by Amy Jarmon, Texas Tech Univ. School of Law. 

First Year Oral Advocacy Competition Results

Photo Gallery

Congratulations to Brittany Hampton, winner of the 2011 First Year Oral Advocacy Competition!

Appellant, Jamie Jackson, and Appellee, Brittany Hampton, advanced from the first semifinals to compete in the final round on April 8, which was judged by Sixth Circuit U. S. Court of Appeals Judge Danny Boggs, Hardin County Family Court Judge Pamela Addington, and Hardin County Chief Regional Circuit Judge Kelly Mark Easton.

Honors & Awards Ceremony Photo Gallery

Note re: registration and Blackburn's Biz Orgs Class

Please note that Professor Tom Blackburn's Business Organizations class will meet from 2:25 p.m. to 4:05 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Fall 2011.  The class does not end at 3:40.  This error occurred when classes were shifted around in a much earlier version of the schedule.  Students taking Professor Blackburn's Business Organizations class in Fall 2011 will not be able to also take a class starting at 3:50 p.m. on a Tuesday or Thursday.  We regret the earlier error.

Spring 2011 Exam Schedule and Revised Fall 2011 Course and Exam Schedules

A revised Fall 2011 course schedule and exam schedule (version 4/7/11) has been posted to the Class Schedules page (under Academics - Resources) of the Law School website.

A major change is that Professor Blackburn's Business Organizations class will meet from 2:25 to 4:05 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.  It will not end at 3:45 p.m., as it is a 4-credit course.  This error occured when courses were shifte in an earlier version of the schedule. 

Other changes include listing Mary Anne Copeland as the instructor of Intellectual Property (on both the course and exam schedules) and to correct a minor typo for Section 33 of the Fall 2011 Basic Legal Skills course.

The Spring 2011 exam schedule, with room numbers, has also been posted on both the Class Schedules and Exam pages (both under Academics) of the Law School website, as well as a note about exams and make-up exams.

When looking at an exam schedule or a course schedule, please note the semester for that schedule at the top so that you don't mistake one semester's schedule for another semester.  Thanks!

Central High School Moot Court Team Wins National Competition

Joshua Puckett, a senior in the Law and Government Magnet at Central High School, won the National Championship at the Marshall-Brennan National Moot Court Competition held in Philadelphia April 2-3.  His teammate and classmate, Mashayla Hays, was the runner-up.  This the first time in the history of the tournament that one school had two of the four finalists, much less finishing as the two most outstanding speakers in the entire competition.

The Central team was made up four outstanding seniors, all of whom made it to the tournament’s semi-final round.  Besides Joshua and Mashayla, the other two semi-finalists representing Central were Hau Duc Le and Chania Coleman.  The team was coached by Professor Sam Marcosson of the Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville, and two law school students, Cennet Kocakulah Braun and Lena Nash Seward.  They work with the students as one component of the School of Law’s partnership with Central’s Law and Government Magnet, and as part of the broader national Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project.  The Moot Court Competition brings together students from various Marshall-Brennan programs sponsored by law schools around the country, giving high school students the opportunity to put into practice the lessons about the constitutional rights they have learned throughout the year, and argue an actual case involving students’ rights under the First Amendment.

"Joshua and Mashayla were tremendous. The judges couldn’t have been more impressed with their knowledge of the cases and the law, or with their poise in answering questions," Professor Marcosson said about their final round performance.  "The coaches from other schools were just as complimentary."


The team was supported by the tireless commitment of the teacher of the Law and Government Magnet program at Central, Joe Gutmann, and Professor Laura Rothstein, who co-ordinates the law school’s partnership with the Magnet, and by  Central’s principal, Dr. Dan Withers. In addition, they got vital help from a number of volunteer attorneys who participated in practice rounds, and made generous donations to help finance the trip to Philadelphia. Several members of the Women Lawyers Association also contributed to the trip costs.   Emily Zahn, '08, of Dinsmore & Shohl, in particular, not only contributed herself but also coordinated significant fundraising efforts at her law firm.  

More New Coverage:

Restorative Justice: A Better Method for Healing the Harm

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Make the Most Out of the Last Two Weeks of Classes

Congratulations!  You are about to finish another semester in law school.  Here are some tips to make the most of the last two full weeks of classes in preparation for finals:

  • Do not skip classes.  Professors often give information about the exam during the last few classes.  In addition, there is a good chance that there will be questions on the exam specifically on the last week’s material.
  • Attend all review sessions that your professors offer.  Professors provide review sessions to help you do well on the exam.  Whether the session is a professor-led review of the material or based on questions and answers, you can use the session to your advantage.  If you are confused about certain areas, then this is the time to get the material straight.  If you think you understand the material, then this is the time to “test” your depth of understanding.
  • If there are not scheduled review sessions, ask your professors any questions that you have this week.   Once classes are over, many professors work from home or work in their offices during limited hours.  Yes, you could e-mail or telephone the professor regarding your questions; however, there is no substitute for being there face-to-face.
  • Try to have all of your reading and outlining completed by April 20.   You want to allow yourself plenty of time for learning your outlines, memorizing black letter law, and applying the concepts through practice questions. 
  • Evaluate your status in each course.   Determine which topics and sub-topics still need to be learned for each course.  Determine which topics and sub-topics just need to be reviewed.  Determine how many practice questions need to be completed for each topic and sub-topic.  Prioritize your studying tasks.  Be realistic. 
  • Map out your plans for each day for the next two weeks.   A monthly calendar format may help you to see when your exams are, when papers are due, when other projects may be due.  Mark down review sessions being held by professors.  For each day, indicate the course(s) you plan to study, the topics or sub-topics for that course, and the hours of study. 
  • Maximize your study time within your plan.   Decide whether you learn better by studying one course all day or by mixing up two or even three courses in the same day.  Decide when you are most alert and place the most difficult tasks (intense learning and memorization for many students) in those time slots.  Use time slots when you are less alert for tasks that you find easier (review of material already learned, practice questions, and flashcards for many students). 
  • Re-check the exam schedule to make sure that you have written the correct days and times down for all of your exams.   Nothing can be more distressing than to find out that you missed an exam because you were not careful enough in noting the dates and times on your calendar.  If in doubt, find out now.
  • Have a talk with your significant others about the fact that you will be studying for exams and need their understanding.   Have a heart-to-heart with your friends, parents, spouse, children, and any others who need to be cooperative with your efforts.  Schedule needed babysitters now.  

Exam4 Now Availabile for Spring Semester Finals

Exam4 is now available for Spring 2011 final exams.  Students who wish to use their computer for exams -- including those who used Exam4 for mid-terms this semester -- must download and install this version of Exam4 and submit a practice test by 11:59 PM EDT, Monday, April 18, 2011.

To take and submit a practice test:

  1. Download and install the version of Exam4 for your computer's operating system;
  2. Take a PRACTICE EXAM (select from drop-down list of classes), identifying yourself by your UofL user name (e.g., eapres01), NOT with your student ID number, exam number or any other alphanumeric string.
  3. Submit your Practice Exam electronically ON CAMPUS ONLY by 11:59 PM EDT, Monday, April 18, 2011.
Periodically throughout the practice exam period and immediately following the deadline, the IT staff will send confirmations via e-mail of successful practice exam submissions.  If you do not receive at least one confirmation following your submission, you should assume your submission is flawed.