Latest News

Thanks to Students Participating in ABA Forums

A special thanks to all students who participated in the two forums with the ABA Site Team on Monday and Tuesday.  We understand that there was a great turnout and that the ABA Site Team really appreciated your comments.  In particular, the site team members described our students as  "mature, thoughtful, intelligent, and very impressive."  Way to go!  Great words of praise for our students.  (Of course, we knew this about you, but it's really great for the site team to see you at your best.)  All of us at the Law School very much appreciate your time, input about the Law School, and impressive work during this evaluative process!  Deans Arnold & Bean

Mardi Gras in the Mosaic Lobby

Jambalaya, Shrimp Creole, Red Beans & Rice, and King Cake

Tuesday, March 8, 11:40 a.m.-1:00 p.m.  It’s Carnival Time and the law school is hosting a Mardi Gras party for the whole school.  We’ll have beads and music and a great (free) lunch for all – students, faculty, and staff.  Feast on Cajun Fixings from Joe’s OK Bayou.  There will be plenty of food (with an extra King Cake set aside for the evening students at 5:00 p.m.).  See you there!

 

Law Review Announces New Members

Congratulations to the Volume 50 Editorial Board & Second Year Members of the University of Louisville Law Review!

Editor-in-Chief: Elisabeth Fitzpatrick

Senior Articles Editor: Amanda Warford

Senior Notes Editor: J. D. Theiss

Executive Editor: Liam Felsen

Managing Editor: Lani Burt

Symposium and Alumni Relations Editor: Molly MacCaskey

Article Selection Editor: Ross Jordan

Articles Editors: Natalie Donahue, Harrison Rich, & Vince Kline

Notes Editors: Shannon Burns, Brenton Stanley, & Alex Davis

Associate Symposium & Alumni Relations Editor:
Kristie Wetterer

Second Year Members: Nathan Fort, Amanda Prager, Tyler Fleck, Ross Neuhauser, Ryan Wood, & James Stewart

A Community of Scholars

 
Roberto Campos, '2010, Law Library Student Worker
 
A representative collection of the law school faculty's scholarship is proudly displayed in the lobby outside the law library.
 
The most reliable measure of an academic faculty's distinction is its body of scholarship,
produced over the course of its individual members' careers and presented in its entirety. 
 
Scholarly works on law -- especially those published as books, chapters, and journal articles
-- advance every aspect of this school's mission. The works themselves, of course,
advance knowledge about the law and allied disciplines. What is perhaps less readily understood is the connection between our school's teaching and scholarly missions. Preparing works of scholarship, like no other activity, keeps our faculty members at the cutting edge of the law. As a result, the best teachers in this profession as a rule are the best scholars, and the best scholars typically rank among our best teachers.
~Dean Jim Chen
 


 

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Take an Inventory of Your Study Habits

We are half-way through the spring 2011 semester.  At this juncture, it is important that you take a few moments to seriously evaluate your academic situation so you can prepare to end strong.  Some of you will be able to pat yourself on the back knowing that you have done, and will continue to do, everything that is necessary to stay on top of your classes and to understand the material.  For others, this is an opportunity to identify bad habits and to correct those habits.  Ask yourself the following questions to assess your likelihood of success, and use these questions as a guide to make positive changes during the second half of the semester:

  1. Have you kept up with the reading in your classes?  Do you get your reading done in advance, or do you scramble on the day of class to finish your reading?
  2. Have you consistently briefed the cases you read in preparation for class? 
  3. Do you always read and take notes on the introductory material in your casebooks, and the notes that may follow the cases you read?
  4. Do you take good class notes?  Do you listen carefully to the dialog that occurs between your professor and your classmates, or do you find yourself checking your email, or checking your facebook page, or zoning out?  
  5. Do you review your class notes within 24 hours so that you can fill in gaps and organize the material, and note any questions that you might have?
  6. Have you visited each of your professors during office hours at least once this semester to clarify questions you have?
  7. Have you started outlines for each of your courses?  Have you reviewed your outlines regularly throughout the semester?
  8. Have you taken advantage of every opportunity to practice your exam writing and to get feedback to improve your exam writing?  If you are a first-year law student, have you taken the practice exams given in the Structured Study Groups; have you completed the Introductory Problems in your Civil Procedure casebook; have you completed the Principal Problems in your Property casebook?
  9. Have you begun the memorization process – learning the rules and elements, learning the steps of analysis, and drilling regularly throughout the semester?
  10. Have you stayed organized this semester?  Do you keep a binder for each class, subdivided with tabs for your case briefs, class notes, handouts, and your class outline? 

If you answered “yes” to these questions, you are on your way to having a successful semester.  If you answered “no” to many of these questions, you need to refocus and make positive changes during the second half of the semester to increase your likelihood of success.

School of Law Awards and Leadership Recognition Program - Save the Date

The annual School of Law Awards and Leadership Recognition Program is scheduled at the University Club for April 1, 2011, beginning with a reception at 5:00 p.m.  All students are invited.  Students who are recipients of named and commonwealth scholarships; recipients of academic and leadership awards; recipients of the highest grades in law school courses in 2010; members of honor societies, professional skills teams, and law school publications; and leaders in student government organizations will be honored.  Recognized students will receive invitations prior to the event.  Questions?  See Dean Bean.   

Deadline March 1 for Institute for Women's Policy Research Summer Internships and Fellowship

IWPR conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings to address the needs of women, promote public dialogue, and strengthen families, communities, and societies. IWPR focuses on issues of poverty and welfare, employment and earnings, work and family issues, health and safety, and women's civic and political participation.

See attachment for description and how to apply.

Shelley Santry: 2011 Woman of Distinction

Shelley Santry

UofL Law Clinic Director
Professor of Law
University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law

Shelley Santry, UofL Law Clinic Director and Assistant Professor of Law has been named a 2011 Woman of Distinction by the Center for Women and Families.

Each year The Center for Women and Families nominates a select group of women whose contributions work in unison to improve opportunity, education and quality of life for women and children in Kentuckiana.

"I am thrilled to be a 2011 Woman of Distinction not only because it isa honor involving my passion, to advocate against domestic violence, butalso because it is given by such an amazing organization as the Centerfor Women and Families. In looking at the list of previous recipients,I am truly honored to be a member of a group of truly awesome women."



Moot Court Information Session

All students are invited to an information session Thursday, Feb. 24, to learn about the Moot Court Board and the opportunity to participate in extramural advocacy and skills competitions.  Brandeis students participate in internal School of Law competitions, in state-wide competitions, in national competitions, and in international competitions.  The Moot Court Board will provide information about how to become a member of the board or a member of one of its extramural advocacy and skills teams.  The session will be at 12:10 p.m. in Room 075.  Questions?  Contact Dean Bean.

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Dealing With Mid-Semester Stressors

This week is the eighth week of classes.  Stress is on the rise.  Some students are choosing negative coping strategies.  Instead, use positive coping strategies like the ones below for your stressors:


Stressor: You are behind in reading for one or more courses.

  • Focus first on current reading assignments so that you are not lost in class.
  • Fit in back reading a few pages or one case at a time until you are caught up again.
  • Avoid becoming dependent on commercial case briefs instead of reading yourself. 

Stressor: You have read everything but are feeling clueless in the course.

  • Determine what you need to do to gain understanding of the material.
  • Some students need to get an overview first before they learn the parts: look at a table of contents, look at the syllabus organization, look at a graphic representation of the topic, read about the topic to get a preview.
  • Some students need to learn the separate parts before they can understand the overview: after each series of cases, focus on the synthesis into the sub-topic; after several sub-topics, focus on the synthesis into the topic; after several topics, focus on the synthesis into the overall course.
  • Consider whether working with a classmate would help you.
  • Consider whether going to the professor with questions would help you.
  • Consider whether reading a carefully chosen supplement would help you.
  • If you are a 1L, consider whether going to your Academic Fellow during office hours would help you.
  • Consider doing all of the above if that is what it takes to sort out the course.

Stressor: You are behind in outlines for your courses.

  • Focus on outlines in the order of easiest to complete (less material covered, more understandable, already have part of it completed) through hardest to complete.
  • Get started.  Waiting until you understand it all or until you have the non-existent free weekend will not help matters.
  • Once an outline is caught up, add to it every week. (The material will still be fresh and will take less time to outline.)

Stressor: You have several deadlines that are very close together.

  • Break down each exam course into the smaller sub-topics that you must study.
  • Break down each paper or project into the smaller tasks for completion.
  • Estimate how long it will take you to complete each small sub-topic or task. 
    Total the full amount of time you will need for each exam or paper or project.  Add 20% to your estimates.
  • Take a calendar and allot tasks to each day so that you finish all tasks before the deadline.