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Phelps Wins Pirtle-Washer Oral Advocacy Competition

Congratulations to Courtney Phelps, winner of the 2010 Pirtle-Washer Oral Advocacy Competition! He and Marilyn Osborn Patterson advanced from the semifinal rounds to compete in the final.

Ben Basil, VP for Internal Affairs of the Moot Court Board, organized the competition; Aaron Dyke and Jared Sawyer were bailiffs; and Karen Jordan served as the faculty advisor.

The pairings for the Semi-Finals were as follows:

  • Whitney True, Appellant v. Courtney Phelps, Appellee
  • Thomas Stevens, Appellant v. Marilyn Osborn, Appellee
SEMI-FINAL ROUND JUDGES
FINAL ROUND JUDGES
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Academic Success Tip - Walk Away From Temptation

Law school classmates are sometimes the hardest to say “no” to because they are adept at arguing that not studying is reasonable.  After all, if they can convince someone else to waste time, their own wasting time isn’t as obvious.

Instead, walk away from temptation.  Focus on one day at a time.  All you can ask of yourself is your best.  Work as hard as you can each day while allowing time for meals and sleep.  Then, you can go to bed knowing that you did all you could do that day.

Spring 2011 Registration Schedule of Courses, Exam Schedule, and Course Notes

The Spring 2011 Schedule of Courses, Exam Schedule, and Course Notes for registration are attached in the document link below.  Details about the registration process will be forthcoming from the Office of Student Life.  Academic Advising will take place October 25, 26, and 27.  If you have questions, please contact Dean Arnold, Dean Bean, Ms. Ballard, or Ms. Thompson.

Spring 2011 Schedule and Exam Schedule

Attached in the links below are the latest version of the Spring 2011 schedule and Spring 2011 exam schedule.  Please note that the changes from the schedule released about 3 weeks ago are that the Structured Study Groups moved to Thursdays at 1:00 p.m., Patent Law has been added, and there are now exam days and times for some evening classes that did not have exam slots in the version of the schedule that came out in mid-August.  Please also pay attention to prerequisites and courses meeting the perspective or skills requirements, as there have been a few updates to these designations.  For the most part, though, the schedule is nearly the same as the prior version that was released.  This will be the version that will be used with registration.  The registration packet, with the course notes (still being edited), will likely be released tomorrow.

Town Hall Meeting Today

Please come to find out more about the Spring and Summer 2011 schedules and to give your feedback on the Summer 2011 schedule and the 2011-12 course offerings and schedules.

Bar Exam Panel Today

Please join May 2010 graduates, Jerred Kelly, Justin Capps, Algeria Ford, and Lily Chan, for a panel discussion regarding the bar exam – what to expect; when to begin the application process; bar review options; creating a study schedule; handling stress; preparing financially; and much more.  The session will begin at 12:05 p.m., in Room 075.  For students who have class ending at 12:05 or beginning at 1:00, the panelists understand that you may be a few minutes late or need to leave a few minutes early.  Pizza will be provided while it lasts.

Academic Success Tip - Beware of Bad Advice (practice questions)

Bad advice:  You can’t do any practice questions until right before the exam because you don’t know enough.  Why this advice is bad advice:

  • Exams are all about applying the concepts and law that you have learned all semester to new fact scenarios or legal problems.
  • You wouldn’t run a 26.2 mile marathon without lots of training and practice.  Why would you go into a law school exam without having worked on several practice questions throughout the semester?
  • A multitude of practice questions are available that test your knowledge on sub-topics and topics and not just entire courses.

Alternatives:

  • Do some practice questions at the end of each sub-topic to test your application skills.  Can you spot the issues and sub-issues?  Can you apply the concepts correctly?  Can you apply the rules and exceptions to the rules?
  • Practice your approach to questions:  how will you analyze the question; how will you marshal the facts; how will you organize your answer; how will you write the answer in the most concise way.
  • Become more adept by starting with one-issue questions, then progressing to two- or three-issue questions, then progressing to more extensive questions.  Once you can organize and answer shorter questions, you can practice your organization for longer questions.
  • Use multiple sources of questions:  questions handed out by the professor; questions in study aids; questions you and your study partners write and swap; questions from prior exams.  
  • Schedule practice question time each week for each course so that you do not forget to practice or put off practice too long.

Bar Exam Panel on Thursday

Upper division students:  This Thursday, please join May 2010 graduates, Jerred Kelly, Justin Capps, Algeria Ford, and Lily Chan, for a panel discussion regarding the bar exam – what to expect; when to begin the application process; bar review options; creating a study schedule; handling stress; preparing financially; and much more.  All panelists are eager to share their experiences with you.  The session will begin at 12:05 p.m., in Room 075.  Pizza will be provided while it lasts.

Academic Success Tip - Beware of Bad Advice (open book exams)

This week’s tips focus on bad advice that is often given out by well-intentioned students.  Critique these pieces of advice carefully and consider the alternatives.
Bad Advice:  You don’t have to study as hard for an open-book exam because you can look up anything that you want.  Why this advice is bad advice:

  • You will have very little time to look up anything during the exam.  Open-book exams are traps for the naïve.
  • If you are only generally familiar with the material, you will not have in-depth knowledge to spot all of the issues and to support your arguments.
  • “Open book” may have a limited definition (Ex. code book but no outlines or notes).  "Open book" may have a limited value-added component (Ex. you may not write in your rule book that is allowed in the exam).

Alternatives:

  • Treat an open-book exam with the same reverence as a closed-book exam.
  • Study the material so well that you “own it” rather than being generally familiar with it.  Then, you will not need to look up much.
  • If it is a code/rule course, you want to have a solid memory for at least a “condensed” version of a code section or rule because you will not have time to look up and read every code section or rule during the exam.
  • If a code/rule book is allowed, make sure you have extensive practice in using that source so you are efficient in its use if you must look something up.
  • Know exactly what the professor will allow you to bring to the exam and any restrictions on writing in books, etc.  Then, plan how to use those resources most efficiently and effectively and only when necessary.
  • Make good and creative use of tabs for code/rule books if allowed by the professor.

Summer 2011 Schedule Options: Your Feedback Is Needed

In order to get the schedule that is most likely to meet the greatest student interest based on the options that are possible for Summer 2011, Associate Dean Arnold would like for any student who is considering taking summer classes (including current 1Ls) to fill out 4 forms, one for each option for the summer schedule, in the attached document and submit it to him (tony.arnold@louisville.edu, Office 213, faculty mailbox) no later than November 1.