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LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR A MAY 2010 DEGREE

Thursday, January 28, 2010 is the last day to apply for a May 2010 degree.

ULink, Student Services, under Degree Information - Degree Application

Weekly Academic Success Tip - New Study Techniques

There is always a buzz around the law school when a new semester begins.  Students are enthusiastic about starting new courses, and some students have decided new study strategies are in order.  Here is some information that will help you to be successful in implementing any new strategies:

  • Research shows that it takes 21 days to implement a new habit fully.  Do not expect overnight success with new study techniques.  It will take several weeks before the new technique “feels part of you” and is more natural.  21 days is the normal time needed, so do not give up if you are almost there for full implementation and need more time.
  • Do not expect to change “everything” at once.  If you expect yourself to lose 20 pounds, quit smoking, cut out all caffeine, cut out all sugar, call your parents every Sunday, learn how to salsa dance, find true love, write the great American novel, get straight “A’s” instead of “C’s” …  Well, you get the picture.  You need to make realistic changes in several areas rather than try for the impossible and set yourself up for defeat. 
  • Be very reasoned in your selection of new study techniques.  Ask the following questions:

          a.  Is the new study technique compatible with my learning preferences?
          b.  If not, is the new study technique compatible with solving a concern I have because of my learning preferences?
          c.  Is the new study technique part of “law school mythology” or does it make sense for me?
          d.  Is the new study technique compatible with necessary areas of improvement that my professors have mentioned during evaluations of my exams?
          e.  If the new study technique is touted by other students who use it, do I know if they are “A” or “B” students so that I know it has a record of success?
           f.  Does the new study technique help me learn material throughout the entire semester rather than in the last few weeks?
          g. Does the new study technique boost memory or work against memory?
          h. Will the new study technique work for all courses or is it more specific to a certain subject matter?
           i. Does the new study technique help me to be more efficient and effective in my studying?
           j. Is the new study technique tied to learning or just to avoiding doing the work myself?
          k. Do I know someone who uses the new study technique so that I can discuss the pros and cons before I invest the time?
          l. What do I see as the pluses and pitfalls of implementing this new study technique?

  • Very structured time management helps to curb procrastination.  Working on curbing procrastination helps you have better time management.  It is a “hand in glove” relationship.  If you need help with these two aspects, set up an appointment to work individually with Ms. Kimberly Ballard.
  • If you are unsure about a new study technique even after evaluating it, consider whether it has enough positive potential that you want to try it out for 1 week to decide whether to implement it permanently.

Bar Exam Presentation

The January 7 Kentucky Bar Exam presentation is now available for viewing at http://media.law.louisville.edu/node/146.  All students taking the July 2010 Kentucky Bar Exam should watch this presentation.  If you need the packet of materials that were distributed during the presentation, please stop by Kimberly Ballard's office (room 212).

Academic Success Tip - New Study Techniques

There is always a buzz around the law school when a new semester begins.  Students are enthusiastic about starting new courses, and some students have decided new study strategies are in order.  Here is some information that will help you to be successful in implementing any new strategies:

  • Research shows that it takes 21 days to implement a new habit fully.  Do not expect overnight success with new study techniques.  It will take several weeks before the new technique “feels part of you” and is more natural.  21 days is the normal time needed, so do not give up if you are almost there for full implementation and need more time.
  • Do not expect to change “everything” at once.  If you expect yourself to lose 20 pounds, quit smoking, cut out all caffeine, cut out all sugar, call your parents every Sunday, learn how to salsa dance, find true love, write the great American novel, get straight “A’s” instead of “C’s” …  Well, you get the picture.  You need to make realistic changes in several areas rather than try for the impossible and set yourself up for defeat.
  • Be very reasoned in your selection of new study techniques.  Ask the following questions: 

          a.  Is the new study technique compatible with my learning preferences?
          b.  If not, is the new study technique compatible with solving a concern I have because of my learning preferences?
          c.  Is the new study technique part of “law school mythology” or does it make sense for me?
          d.  Is the new study technique compatible with necessary areas of improvement that my professors have mentioned during evaluations of my exams?
          e.  If the new study technique is touted by other students who use it, do I know if they are “A” or “B” students so that I know it has a record of success? 
           f.  Does the new study technique help me learn material throughout the entire semester rather than in the last few weeks? 
          g. Does the new study technique boost memory or work against memory? 
          h. Will the new study technique work for all courses or is it more specific to a certain subject matter? 
           i. Does the new study technique help me to be more efficient and effective in my studying? 
           j. Is the new study technique tied to learning or just to avoiding doing the work myself? 
          k. Do I know someone who uses the new study technique so that I can discuss the pros and cons before I invest the time? 
          l. What do I see as the pluses and pitfalls of implementing this new study technique?

  • Very structured time management helps to curb procrastination.  Working on curbing procrastination helps you have better time management.  It is a “hand in glove” relationship.  If you need help with these two aspects, work individually with Ms. Kimberly Ballard on these aspects.
  • If you are unsure about a new study technique even after evaluating it, consider whether it has enough positive potential that you want to try it out for 1 week to decide whether to implement it permanently.

JULY 2010 KY BAR EXAM

If you are planning to take the KY Bar Exam in July, and you have not started to complete the KY Bar Exam Application, you need to start TODAY.  The deadline to submit a completed application, application fee, authorization and release forms, credit report, computer testing release of liability form (if applicable), and non-standard testing accommodations application (if applicable) is FEBRUARY 1.   If you were unable to attend the KY Bar Presentation on January 7, be sure to stop by Kimberly Ballard's office (Room 212) to pick up handouts that were distributed at the meeting.  As soon as the video from the 1/7 presentation is posted on LawTube, a notice will be posted in the Daily Docket.  All students taking the KY Bar Exam in July need to watch the presentation.

Catalog of Faculty Scholarship

Catalog of Faculty Scholarship

The first ever comprehensive compilation of our faculty's scholarhip has been released.

Highlights include each faculty member's biography, a list of their publications, and an index arranged by courses taught and areas of expertise.

This catalog reports our faculty's enduring contributions to legal education the legal profession, and the broader communities served by lawyers and law professors. ~Dean Jim Chen

Print copies are available for purchase in the Resource Center across from room 275 or by contacting (502) 852-1246. Digital copies are available for download online.

Photo Gallery: The Place of Religion in Public Life - A Debate

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Tips for a New Semester

Here are some things to consider at the start of this new semester.  I am happy to help you with any of the areas for which you want to make an appointment.
  • Remember that a grade measured your knowledge and application on one set of questions at one point in time on one day.  If you did very well, congratulations.  But do not slack off because you think you will do that well again without working hard.  If you did not do as well as you wanted, realize that changes in study habits can make a world of difference.  Some people catch on to law school faster than others.
  • Study smarter not harder.  There are many strategies and techniques that can make you more efficient and effective.  Law school success is not only about knowing the law and applying it.  Law school success is also about knowing how to study the law.  Even 2L and 3L students can benefit from new study habits. 
  • Ask for assistance if you are not happy with your grades.  You are not destined to be the “great middle” of your class if you are willing to take control of the situation and seek help.  Make an appointment with the Director of Academic Success.  Ask questions regularly of your professors.  Find a good study partner or study group.  If you are a 1L, sign up for the Structured Study Group program. 
  • Use study aids wisely.  Study aids are supplements to your own work and processing of the material.  Study aids are not shortcuts to avoid your own work.  You must do the struggling with the material to understand it deeply and be able to apply it.  Use study aids to assist in your understanding.
  • Remember that memorization of the law takes time.  You must know your “black letter” law as a foundation.  You must know the main rules, the exceptions to the rules, the variations on the rules, and the exact elements/factors of the rules.  Drill.  Drill.  Drill.
  • Outline every week for every course.  By staying on top of your outlining, you give yourself a master document from which to study for exams.  You need to understand the overview, the relationship among concepts, the methodologies (steps of analysis and tests), and enough detail to flesh all of it out.  By condensing material each week, you begin to master these four levels of knowledge.
  • Review regularly throughout the semester.  Study for exams all semester long.  If you distribute your learning, you will have deeper understanding of the law, retain information better, recall information better, recognize issues more easily, and be able to answer questions more effectively.  You forget 80% of what you learn within two weeks without regular review.  If you wait until the last six weeks to study for exams, you will be re-learning nine weeks of material while you are learning six weeks of material for the first time. 
  • Practice applying the law.  It is essential to know the law, but you MUST be able to apply the law to new fact scenarios.  The more practice questions you do, the better you will be at spotting issues, understanding nuances in the law, and using proper test-taking techniques.
  • Use time management techniques to your advantage.  You can get all of your tasks done every week and still have time to enjoy life!  If you will work with the Director of Academic Success on how to structure your time, you can read/brief, review before class, outline, review for exams, write papers, and complete practice questions each week with time left over.

Library's Basement & Lab Re-Open

The law library's basement and basement lab have finally re-opened after having incurred severe damage during the August 2009 floods.

Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky

PRESS RELEASE

UofL Law Library Enhances Its Digital Collection

January 6, 2010

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The University of Louisville Law Library, in conjunction with University Libraries, has enhanced its digital collection with the addition of 88 plates from H. Levin's Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky (1897).  The illustrations are portraits of lawyers active in Kentucky’s first century of statehood. The persons portrayed include the nationally famous, like U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan and Senator Henry Clay, but the majority of the illustrations are of lawyers whose greatest prominence was in the cities and towns of Kentucky where they practiced their trade.  The Law Library Collection can be accessed at http://digital.library.louisville.edu/collections/law/.

Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky is an important biographical source for information about the Kentucky bench and bar in the 19th century.  The 777-page encyclopedia attempted to capture the geographical breadth of the state’s legal community in 1897 by surveying all of Kentucky’s disparate regions. While most of the work consists of detailed biographies, there are also historical sketches of legal institutions and articles on the bench and bar of Kentucky’s cities, towns and counties.

Good copies of the original 1897 edition are relatively rare.  The Southern Historical Press published a xerographically reproduced edition in 1982 that is available in many libraries, but the reprint edition made little attempt to replicate the 88 high-quality illustrations in any detail. This collection attempts to remedy this by digitizing these illustrations. They derive from an unusually well-preserved copy of the original work found in the rare books collection of the University of Louisville Law Library.  

The Law Library’s digital collection draws on the varied collections of the Law Library of the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. The first titles to be made available were the William Littell's Statute Law of Kentucky, which compiles all the legal enactments relating to Kentucky from its beginning as a district of Virginia to 1819, and Report of the Debates and Proceedings of the Convention for the Revision of the Constitution of the State of Kentucky (1849), a rare transcript of the debates of the convention that drafted Kentucky's third constitution.

For more information, contact Virginia M. Smith at (502) 852-2075.