Latest News

LBA Announcements

The Louisville Bar Association would like to inform members of our law school community about their new Twitter page. Yes, you heard correctly. The LBA is now 'Tweeting' with the goal of improving dialogue between LBA members, law students and other legal professionals in our community.

Also, everyone is invited to attend their press conference scheduled for Monday, April 20 at 10 AM in the Judicial Center (2nd floor Attorneys Room) as they announce the results of this year's Judicial Evaluation of Jefferson Circuit and Family Court judges. Many of whom have sat and ruled on recent highly publicized cases including the Bellarmine student Katie McCoy trial (Judge Susan Shultz Gibson), PRP student Max Gilpin trial (Judge Mitchell Perry) and the recent Eeron Harper murder trial (Judge James Shake).

The conference is open to the public.

Coming Soon: ExamTracker 3000

By the beginning of Spring 2009 final exams on Wednesday, April 22, the IT staff plans to deploy ExamTracker 3000™, an amazing, new, high-tech program that will display students' exam numbers in real time as they complete and submit Exam4 exams.  ExamTracker 3000 ™will be set up in a prominent place on the first floor of the classroom wing.  Using ExamTracker 3000™, students will know with absolute certainty that their electronic exams have been successfully submitted and received.

Kudos Professor Harris

Law Librarian Robin Harris has been awarded for having provided 25 years of invaluable service to the University. Prior to her role at the law library, she served as a reference librarian at Ekstrom Library.

Hooding Poll for Graduating Students

Students graduating next month are encouraged to vote for the faculty members whom they wish to present the graduates' hoods at the Law School Convocation.  The online survey form is at www.law.louisville.edu/students/sba/grad-survey. Graduating students must log in with their Lawnet credentials to vote in the poll and may only vote once.  You may select up to three faculty members.  Only the names of those faculty members who will be present at the Convocation are listed.

Moot Court Competitors return from Vienna

ILS Moot Court Team Members

 

Left to right: Arbitrators Dr. Prof. Christian Schwartz (Netherlands), Prof. Janet Walker (Canada) and Ziva Filipic (Slovenia), University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law teammates Marshall Casey, Rebecca Simms, UNAM teammates Luis Paz and Angelica Huacuja

The Willem Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot involved 233 teams representing 59 countries and 1,500 students.  Fifty-three United States law schools were represented, although the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law team was the only team representing Kentucky.  There were more than 600 arbitrators from around the world – drawn from law firms and law school faculties – comprised the three-person panels that heard more than 1,000 arbitrations.  

The  University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law team was represented by Marshall Casey and Rebecca Simms. The team acquitted itself extremely well in the first four rounds, receiving very positive comments from the Arbitrators, and actually competed against three teams that went on to the finals.

In the first round the  University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law team went against the top team of three representing the University of Paris, the Sorbonne; in round two they went against the National Autonomous University of Mexico which could be described as the “Harvard of Mexico,” the number one school in the country; they faced Charles University, Czech Republic, in round three, and, finally, the University of Munich, an extremely strong school and one of 24 German (second only to the United States) teams.  As noted, Paris, UNAM and Munich went on to the finals.

Although the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law team did not make the final round of 64 they moved very successfully through the first four rounds, learned a great deal and represented Brandeis in a very important aspect of the gathering, international networking.  It seemed that many participants – from both civil law and common law countries were aware of Louis Brandeis.  There were also opportunities to view the art and history of Vienna. In this the team was aided by alumna, Kristina Huddleston,`97.

Keith Sealing, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Law Clinic Open House and Reception

Central High School Moot Court Team Members The UofL Law Clinic Open House and Reception showcases the UofL Law Clinic, an initiative that enables the law school to refocus legal education as a primarily (or even exclusively) classroom-based endeavor into an active, hands-on enterprise of learning by doing.

 

We'd like to thank all the members of the Louisville legal community, alumni, faculty, staff and students who shared in this celebration.

University of Louisville Law Clinic students, from left: Dustin Thacker, Becca O'Neill, Chad Reid, Christopher McDavid, Caroline Pieroni, Amy Jay. Photo credit: Robert Pieroni
Professor Lars Smith, Dean Jim Chen and the incoming Clinic Director Shelley Santry enjoy the reception.
Becca O'Neill and her classmates present gifts to their instructors Stewart Pope, Legal Aid Advocacy Director, and Lars Smith, University of Louisville Professor and Samuel J. Stallings Chair in Law.
Guests enjoy the conversation and live music, compliments of Middleton Reutlinger and Stites & Harbison.
Law Clinic Reception Guests Law students, Cheri Jones and Simone Beach
Wine, beer, and soft drinks were provided by Middleton Reutlinger and Stites & Harbison. Bourbon tasting provided by Woodford Reserve.
Hors d'oeuvres provided by Carrabba's Italian Grill. Vickie Tencer (Unit Business Manager), Kathy Urbach (Assistant Dean for Career Services and Public Service) and Jina Scinta (Program Assistant)
Professor Susan Duncan, Justice Elisabeth Hughes Abramson, Judge Paula Sherlock, Professor Laura Rothstein, and Maria Fernandez, '89
Third year student and Law Clinic member Caroline Pieroni and family, from left: Jennifer Lynch Nickel, Mark Nickel, David Lynch, Julia Lynch, Caroline Lynch Pieroni, Robert Pieroni
Law student, Amy Jay
University of Louisville Law Students

Central Partnership Moot Court Competition

Central High School Moot Court Team Members Four students from Central High School competed at the inaugural Marshall-Brennan National Civil Liberties Moot Court Competition in Philadelphia on March 21-22.  Kimberly Albritton, Jack Chen, Osiah Graham, and Sasha Richmond represented their school, the Law & Government Magnet, and the University of Louisville’s Central High Partnership and achieved incredible success in the tournament.
 
Osiah Graham, a senior at Central who plans to attend the University of Louisville as a Harlan Scholar in the fall, reached the semi-final round of the competition, which meant he was among the 16 most outstanding competitors in the entire nation.  His classmates Kim Albritton and Sasha Richmond both advanced to the quarter-finals, making the Central students by far the most successful team at the entire tournament.  Teams came from all over the country, representing Marshall-Brennan programs from Washington, D.C., to Phoenix, and from Boston to Baton Rouge.  No other contingent came close to doing what Central did by having three-quarters of its students reach the quarter-final round.
 
The team was coached by Brandeis School of Law students Colleen Clemons (who accompanied the team to Philadelphia), Amy Jay, Jason Schwalm, and Heather Stone.  All are third-year students who have taught at Central in the Marshall-Brennan program this year, working with the Law & Government program’s long-time teacher, Joe Gutmann.  Colleen was joined in Philadelphia by law school professor and Marshall-Brennan faculty supervisor Sam Marcosson, who also helped coach the students as they prepared for the competition.
 
“Their performances were terrific,” Marcosson said.  “They proved that our Central students can compete with the very best students from around the country, and excel on the academic side just as they have on the football field and basketball court this year.  They worked hard to prepare, and impressed the judges with their knowledge of the law, the facts of the cases, and ability to deal with tough questions.”

Photo Gallery: From Prop 8 to SB 68

Diversity Forum Series: From Prop 8 to SB 68: Legislative Attacks on LGBT Families - April 7, 2009

Dean Jim Chen Christopher McDavid
Dean Chen opens the program. Moderator, Christopher McDavid introduces the panel.
Bryan Gatewood  Chris Hartman  Rev. Vernon Broyles 
Bryan Gatewood Chris Hartman Reverend Vernon S. Broyles, III
Panelists Panelists
The panelists engage in a discussion while a clip of an interview with Chris Hartman on “Kentucky Tonight” appears on the screen.
Nancy Baker and Miriam Schusler serve lunch Diversity Committee Members
Nancy Baker and Miriam Schusler-Williams serve lunch. Diversity Committee Members

Inaugural ACS Event

Sean Donaldson, Gregory Belzley, James Fisher

On April 8, attorney Gregory Belzley presented "Civil Rights of the Incarcerated." This first event of the University's recently formed, American Constitution Society chapter, was well attended.  

Pictured at left:  Sean Donaldson, ACS Program Director, Gregory Belzley, and James Ficher, ACS President

*Click on each of the photos for a larger image.

Introduction Discussion Founding Members
Sean Donaldson introduces Mr. Belzley. Mr. Belzley takes questions from the audience. Mr. Belzley meets with the founding members of the law school's ACS chapter.

Register for the Clinic!

Update: Message from Professor Santry about registration (April 14, 2009)

Spots are still available in the Law Clinic for Fall 2009.  If you missed last week's information session about the clinic, you may watch the video here.

Professor Shelley Santry is the new permanent director of the law clinic. She has 16 years legal experience in the Louisville legal community, as an attorney with Legal Aid, and most recently as an assistant county attorney.

The clinic is located downtown at 416 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd. Students enrolled in the clinic will work on housing and some limited domestic violence cases referred to the clinic by Legal Aid. Students that participate will be representing these clients as the primary attorney dealing with the matter, and so this is a great opporunity to get some hands on experience with real clients.

The clinic will consist of a weekly classroom meeting, plus clinic office hours.

The clinic class will be limited to eight students, and registration is only allowed by permission of the director, Shelley Santry. You can only take the clinic if you have completed 60 credit hours by the time you enroll in the clinic (i.e., credits to be earned next fall will not count). This is a requirement of the Kentucky Bar.

Here's how you apply:

Submit the following 3 documents to Professor Lars Smith by 5:00 pm, Wednesday, April 15 (his office is Room 286):


  1. Statement of Intent of why you wish to participate in the clinic (maximum 1 page, single spaced).

  2. Copy of your resume.

  3. Copy of your transcript.

Final decisions will be made by the end of the semester.  In the meantime, students are advised to make alternative scheduling plans in case their request to enroll in the clinic is not approved.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • Housing court cases are heard during the morning, usually between 9 and 10:30 am. Therefore you should not schedule all of your other classes before noon. While we may be able to occasionaly arrange your case load to fit around your schedule to some degree, having extensive morning obligations will not work.
  • Students will have the opportunity to work with Prof. Santry on family court emergency protective order hearings on several Mondays during the semester. The hearings are usually scheduled some time between 8:30 and 2:30 on Mondays, so students should be prepared to have a 3 hour block of time available during this period. NOTE: You will only be expected to do this a few times, not every Monday. 
  • There will be a classroom component which will meet everyweek at the law school. 
  • You will have to sign up for offices hours which will require you to be present in the clinic offices downtown.
  • The first few weeks of school the classroom component will run more than the allotted time in order to teach you about the basics of working on a housing case or EPOs. Once we know everyone's schedule, Professor Santry will work with everyone to arrange the time for this program.
  • You will have to sit in on housing court before the semester begins.

Professor Santry will provide more detail about these items as we get closer to the beginning of the semester.

Please contact Professor Lars Smith with any questions you may have. If he cannot answer them, he will pass your question along to Professor Santry.