Latest News

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Taking Effective Notes in Class:  Avoid simply rewriting information about the cases that is already contained in your case briefs.  Instead, simply correct or add to your briefs so that they accurately reflect what your professor and classmates are saying about the case.  If you use this technique, you will likely be more engaged in the professor's lecture.  For more tips, attend the Workshop this afternoon at 1:00 p.m. in Room 275.

Flood Relief Fund

The law school has started a Flood Relief Fund to provide assistance to some of our students who were adversely affected by the flood that occurred on Tuesday, August 4. 

If you'd like to contribute, please contact either Vickie Tencer, Bob Micou or Matt Williams. If you've been affected and would like to request assistance, please contact Vickie Tencer by email or by phone at 502.852.6092.

 

Related News:

 

More Resources:

This information appeared in the Courier-Journal and may be helpful. Numbers to call:

  • For food, clothing or other services: 311 (metro government)
  • For special request of the Red Cross: 589-4450
  • To volunteer through the United Way: 292-6107
  • For help from the United Way: 292-6115
  • Metro United Way's Volunteer Engagement Center is recruiting standby volunteers, age 18 and older, to respond quickly to flood cleanup needs in the community.
  • Anyone wishing to join the volunteer standby list should register at www.metrounitedway.org/volunteer or call 292-6107.
  • People who require assistance who lack physical or financial capacity to handle flooding cleanup should call 292-6115 or register online. They will be contacted by representatives of the member organizations of Kentucky and Indiana Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters.
  • If you have suffered damage and would like to request aid from the university, or if you would like to volunteer your time and effort to help victims, send an email to Tammy Lawson.

Community Service Day Photo Gallery

More than 100 students from the Brandeis School of Law volunteered their time Aug. 14 as part of “Community Service Day,” a new, optional program offered as part of the school’s student orientation. Activities also are planned for Aug. 15.

Volunteer opportunities ranged from trash pick-up and dog walking to painting and yard work. The Student Bar Association-organized program included nine different agencies in the Louisville area.

The community service option seemed to be a welcome addition to the orientation program, said Kathleen Bean, professor and associate dean for Student Life at the law school.

“We had 109 of 142 students sign up in advance and a few added themselves after they got here,” she said.

Read the full story, Law school students embrace community service, and view more photos.

Operation Brightside Volunteers
Operation Brightside Volunteers Clean Up Central Park
Family Scholar House Volunteers Donated Cleaning Supplies
Volunteers Bag Donations for the Family Scholar House Donated Cleaning Supplies
Habitat for Humanity Volunteers Habitat for Humanity Volunteers
Ross Neuhauser, Ross Jordan, Jeremy Climer, Ryan Anderson, Jackie Clowers, Alex White, John Friend and Virginia M. Smith volunteered at Habitat for Humanity.
Habitat for Humanity Volunteers Habitat for Humanity Volunteers
Habitat for Humanity Volunteers Habitat for Humanity Volunteers

New Student Printing Policy

Effective at the beginning of the 2009-2010 academic year, law students may now purchase additional printing credit to supplement their 500-page per semester allotment.  Printing credit must be purchased in 100-page increments for five dollars ($5) each in the Law Resource Center, room 272.

NOTE: Additional printing credit purchased in the Law Resource Center will not be available until the next business day after purchase.

The full, new Student Printing Policy is available at www.law.louisville.edu/it/policies/printing.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Create Your Own Case Briefs for Every Case You Read

Case briefing is a formalized way of taking notes on your reading in preparation for class.  Creating your own case briefs is important for several reasons:  (1) you will be better prepared for class discussion; (2) you will develop the analytical skills that are critical to success on exams; (3) you will crystallize your understanding of the case; (4) you will be able to review a group of related cases easily and efficiently without having to rely on your memory or having to re-read cases; and (5) you can use your briefs and class notes to create your course outlines.   Don't make the mistake that many law students make during the fall semester - they brief only sporadically or stop briefing completely because they believe it is too time-consuming.  The task of case briefing is worth the added time and effort, and it will actually save you time when it counts - when preparing for exams! 

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Start Your Day Early and On Time

 

The work day typically begins between 8:00 and 9:00 AM and so should your study day.  A good rule of thumb is to spend three hours studying (outside of class) for every hour of class time.  This translates into between 45 and 50 hours per week studying pre-class and post-class (30 to 38 hours if you are in the part-time program).  Considering the number of hours you will spend studying, it may not be possible to get everything done in the evening, even if you are a "night owl."  Night time studying may have worked in college, in part, because you rarely spent 40 to 50 hours preparing for classes.  So, try to start your study day early and work during the daylight hours.

Last Day To Add A Class & Refund Dates

Friday, August 21 is the last day to add a class or change a class to an audit.

 

TUITION REFUND DATES

Friday, August 21      100% refund

Friday, Sept. 4             50% refund

Friday, Sept. 11           25% refund

Second Annual Conference on Innovation and Communication Law

This year's Innovation and Communication Law conference will focus mainly on the role intellectual property and communications law play in the dissemination of information. As a result, discussion will focus less on the creation of rights and more on how the legal system helps (or hinders) the development of knowledge.


Attendance at the Saturday morning session has been approved for two CLE ethics credits.

The event will be held this Friday and Saturday, August 21-22, at the Louisville Marriott Downtown.

Free tickets are available to students, but meals are not included.

For more information, visit: www.law.louisville.edu/CICL

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Take Control of Your Studying Before Too Much Time Flies By

  • Designate one place in your apartment where you will have your law school study center.  Organize all of your casebooks, study aids, dictionaries, binders, spiral notebooks, and other study materials in this one spot.  When you finish with a binder or casebook or stapler, return it to its place.  You will waste less time searching for your law school materials if you have one spot for everything.
  • Make a shopping list of what study materials you need and stock your apartment study center now.  Buy extra notepads, pens, ink cartridges, printer paper, paper clips, and other materials.  By anticipating your needs for the semester, you can avoid multiple or panicked trips to the office supply store later.  Also, you may be able to save money by buying bulk quantities instead of separate purchases of the items over time. 
  • Lay out everything you will need the next day before you go to bed.  It is easier to get organized while you can think calmly about the items you need for each class.  Grabbing up items as you rush out the door will likely lead to not having everything you need once you arrive at the law school.
  • Purchase a large dry erase board for your study center if you think it will help you.  Visual learners often benefit greatly from a dry erase board with multiple colors of markers.  Create flowcharts, methodologies, IRAC outlines for practice question answers, or other information initially on a dry erase board.  You can add, delete, and modify until you are happy with the result.  Then, you can copy the final version on to the computer or paper.  Some students use the dry erase board for calendaring and listing “to do” items. 
  • Use monthly and weekly schedules and daily “to do” lists to organize yourself.    The monthly schedule can be used for deadlines and assigning daily tasks to meet the deadlines on time.   The weekly schedule can be used to design a study schedule that can be repeated most weeks to make certain you are getting all study tasks done each week.   “To do” lists can be used to prioritize the most important tasks each day. 

Law Library Fall Semester Hours

The law library returns to its regular schedule on Monday, August 17. During the fall semester, we will generally be open from 8 AM - 11 PM Monday thru Thursday, 8 AM - 6 PM on Fridays, 9AM - 6 PM on Saturdays, and 1 PM - 11 PM on Sundays.

Refer to the library hours for details and excpetions.