Latest News

Professor Powell named Dean for Research for 2016

Brandeis School of Law Dean Susan Duncan has announced that Professor Cedric Powell has agreed to be the Dean for Research next year.

“Professor Powell's reputation nationally as an excellent scholar and his mentoring experience makes him a great choice,” said Dean Duncan.

Professor Powell has been a lead primary commentator/panelist for the annual John Mercer Langston Black Male Faculty Writing Workshops, and has also spearheaded the Charles Parrish Brother-to-Brother Initiative on campus, which helps recruit, retain and promote African American male staff, faculty and administrators.

Dean Duncan will work with Professor Powell to bring speakers to the law school on a variety of topics. Professor Powell succeeds Professor John Cross in this role.

Legal Aid Society sets Brush, Bottle and Barrel of the Bluegrass event

The Legal Aid Society’s Brush, Bottle and Barrel of the Bluegrass will be held on April 24, from 5:30 to 8:30 at Louisville Collegiate School.  All proceeds of this annual event benefit the Legal Aid Society’s mission of “pursuing justice for people in poverty.”

Brandeis School of Law has a connection with the Legal Aid Society through our Brandeis Fellows, the LAS externship, public service placements, and the Judge Ellen B. Ewing Internship in Public Service, which is annually awarded to one of our students.

The Brush, Bottle and Barrel is an evening of sampling Kentucky bourbons, wines and beers and food from local restaurants.  In addition there will be a silent auction featuring vacation getaways, sporting events tickets, airline tickets and more.  The BBB also functions as the preview party for the Cherokee Triangle Art Fair.  You can purchase art objects before the Fair opens to the public on Saturday.

Professor McNeal quoted in SF Chronicle about South Carolina police shooting

Professor Laura McNeal was quoted in an article that appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle over the weekend, headlined “Video of police shooting isn’t a lock for criminal conviction.”

The article examines the North Charleston, South Carolina, incident on April 4 in which Police Office Michael T. Slager shot and killed Walter L. Scott while he fled from a traffic stop. Video of the incident was caught on a bystander’s cell phone and showed Slager firing off eight shots, four of which hit Scott in the back.

Slager, 33, has been arrested and charged with murder.

The San Francisco Chronicle article questions if video evidence is enough to convict Slager, pointing to previous incidents caught on video that did not yield such results, including last year’s fatal chokehold that killed Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York, and the Rodney King case from 1991.

In the latter case, police officers testified that they were defending themselves from an aggressive King. Professor McNeal said that angle is unlikely to be used in the South Carolina case because Scott didn’t appear to pose a threat and was also unarmed.

“I’d be hard-pressed to find a jury that would not convict this officer of murder,” McNeal told the publication, adding that a jury might conclude that Slager didn’t have time to plan the killing and convict him of second-degree murder instead of premeditated first-degree murder.

Paws for the Law - This Wednesday!!

We are currently scheduled to have at least 8 dogs here on Wednesday!!  Everyone needs some puppy love before finals.  Stop by the first floor lounge starting at about 11 am to say hi, get a lick or give a hug!!

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Recent Bar Publications

Here's a roundup of recent law school related news from the Louisville and Kentucky Bar Associations.

Highlights from the LBA's April 2015 Bar Briefs:

  • Dean Susan Duncan's April column features "The Brandeis Connection to SCOTUS' Same-Sex Marriage Decision" and "Brandeis Students Gain 'Real Life' Experiences Through College of Business Partnership" (pages 6 & 9).
  • Professor Kurt Metzmeier writes about "Homing in on the Home-Rule Rules: Researching Kentucky Municipal and County Law" (page 17)
Highlights from the LBA's March 2015 Bar Briefs:
  • "Behind the Bench: Judge Jennifer H. Leibson, Jefferson District Court, Division 5" features Professor Leibson's daughter (page 4).
  • Professors Mark Rothstein, JoAnne Sweeny, and Russ Weaver are spotlighted in "Technology and Privacy - 50 years after Griswold v Connecticut" for their work on privacy issues (page 6).
  • The Dean's column also includes, "Laboratory for Democracy and Citizenship and the 2015 Brandeis Medal Recipient" (page 6).
Highlights from the LBA's February 2015 Bar Briefs:
  • In her monthly column, Dean Duncan reports about the Inaugural Diversity and Inclusion Summit and announces that Arthur Miller has been named the 2015 Brandeis Medalist. Lastly, Professors Laura McNeal and Cedric Powell are spotlighted in "Brandeis Professors Add to Ferguson Discussion" (page 6).
  • Photos of the Louisville Law School community are featured in "Bench & Bar Social" (pages 12-13).
  • "Diversity and Disability Discrimination: Impact on the Legal Profession" by Professor Laura Rothstein (pages 18-19)
Highlights from the Kentucky Bar Association's March 2015 Bench & Bar (Vol 79, No 2):
  • "Batson v. Kentucky: A Retrospective" by Professor Justin Walker (pages 10-13)
  • "Young Lawyers Called to Public Service" may be of interest to Louisville Law students (pages 18-21).
  • "Data Breach and the Kentucky Lawyer" by Professor Michael Losavio, UofL Justice Administration
  • The bi-monthly UofL column features an introduction to two incoming Louisville Law faculty, Goldburn P. Maynard and Justin Walker. Also included is an announcement about Daniel Cameron, '11, being named Senator McConnell's Legal Counsel (pages 49-50).
  • Several graduates are featured in "On the Move" (pages 70-77).
  • Robert Franklin Cooper Jr., '38, is honored "In Memoriam". He lived to be 101 years old  (page 78).
Both publications are available at the Law Library.  

Lost and Found Inventory April 2015

Please claim items in the Law Resource Center, Room 272.

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.