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Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contat Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Moot Court Board Final Meeting, 12:05 p.m., Room LL80

Federal Tax Externship – 2015 Summer and Fall

The tax externship for summer 2015 is filled, but there are still three externships available for the 2015 fall semester.

The local office of IRS Chief Counsel is the “law firm” for the local IRS office and agents.  The office of Chief Counsel functions much like any other law firm, except that their only client is the IRS. 
Externs work under the direct supervision of IRS attorneys and Professor Blackburn. The office handles a variety of issues including tax issues, collection, bankruptcy, state law contract rights, criminal law and trial related issues such as statute of limitations, jurisdiction, discovery and evidence issues.  As externs, you participate directly in staff meetings; you research and write legal memos, meet with taxpayers and their attorneys or CPAs and meet with IRS agents who have questions about tax issues or about other issues involving state of federal non-tax law. Externs may take the lead in meetings with pro se taxpayers.  Externs assist IRS trial attorneys with trial preparation and sometimes the student-extern represents the IRS in U.S. Tax Court against pro se taxpayers.
To be eligible for this externship you must be enrolled in school on at least a half-time basis and you must have successfully completed at least one course in Federal taxation.

If you would like more information, please contact Professor Blackburn (tblackburn@louisville.edu or 502-852-6384).  The required security clearance can take four to six weeks, so the process needs to be completed before the fall semester begins.

 

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contat Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration is open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration is open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Brandeis’ inaugural Human Rights Fellowship program now seeking applicants

The University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law’s inaugural Human Rights Fellowship program will be available for incoming students and will build off of the Louisville Bar Foundation’s Greenbaum Human Rights Fellowship that was created for the 2014-15 year.

Brandeis’ program is geared toward students who are interested in human rights advocacy to address human rights needs in the Louisville community. The initial focus is on the city’s immigrant/refugee population.

In the fall, the admissions-based grant will offer a handful of competitive fellowships for incoming students to work on projects during their first three years in law school. Students will be able to explore human rights law through hands-on experiences and will develop research, project management and interpersonal skills while offering an opportunity to work with diverse and often vulnerable populations.

Their work will be supervised by Professors Enid Trucios-Haynes and Jamie Abrams.

Abrams said the initial work on the grant has so far included an extensive needs assessment effort identifying ways in which the law school could be active in the community on human rights issues. Together with the faculty supervisors, the LBFG Human Rights Fellows – Janet Lewis, Katherine Hall and Ben Potash – have examined what services are being provided to the immigrant population in the City of Louisville and are identifying challenges and opportunities.

Progress thus far
The initial focus has been on immigration needs because it is an area in which students have an interest, said Trucios-Haynes.

“I have been teaching this subject for the past 20 or so years and I have seen an increase in interest from students because of the greater public awareness of immigration policy issues. But it’s also an area of the law that includes the unique intersection of constitutional law, criminal law, international law and a statutory code that is complex,” she said.

Other law schools in major coastal cities have built these types of initiatives using fellowship-type programs. Abrams was familiar with one issued through her alma mater, American University. With the professors’ combined interest in immigration law, the idea to get a similar program going here was an exciting culmination to a transitional grant provided by the Louisville Bar Foundation to grow a more sustainable program.

Thus far, the project’s participants have compiled information about organizations in the community working for immigrants, from health care services to education. Abrams said this needs assessment effort is extensive and necessary to streamline the services and ensure their effectiveness. As part of this process, the student fellows are interviewing every organization in the community that works with the immigrant population and are also interviewing the immigrant population to learn if they know about the organizations and if their needs are being met.

With this comprehensive information, they are developing a report – to be published this semester – on any needs or opportunities to serve this population.

They are also brainstorming ways that the law school could help fill any gaps in service. For example, in October, the school hosted an event focused on the humanitarian crisis of women and children at the border. In February, the students and faculty members spoke at a Day of Dignity event, organized by the Muhammad Ali Institute for Peace and Justice, to distribute the organizations’ resource guides and educate the local community about their existence.

The Human Rights fellows entering law school in the fall will be committed to implementing the recommendations published in the report. They will work with alumni on cases, create outreach presentations and also come up with legislative proposals.

Objectives
Abrams and Trucios-Haynes are both aiming for the Human Rights Fellowship to have a sustained presence at Brandeis School of Law and to continue and accelerate work with the rest of the community on human rights issues.
“We have many undocumented children in Kentucky. And I think our biggest hurdle is educating people that they’re here, not just in Texas or California,” Abrams said. “Many people have no idea about the depth of our international community here, specifically in Louisville.”

Trucios-Haynes added that the fellowship is appealing to incoming students because it is innovative and has never been done before at the school.

“I hope to build something that is lasting and will provide assistance to our local community, both service providers and the immigrant/refugee/noncitizen community,” she said.

Once a dent has been made in the research and execution of the immigration project, the Brandeis Human Rights Fellowship’s focus could shift to other topics, such as women in detention centers, educational access or wage issues. The objective, however, will remain the same.

“Our dream is for this work to be collaborative between our students, faculty, alumni and community. There is a lot of work being done right now, but it’s being done mostly as piecemeal,” Abrams said. “There is a significant community need for these types of services and we will be more effective if we meet these needs holistically.”

Application information
Beginning with the entering class of 2015, student leaders will receive academic stipends renewable annually for the full three years course of law study. These stipends will be awarded at levels of $2,500 in the first academic year, and $5,000 in the second and third academic year after completing the service hours in the prior year successfully. Students commit to contribute a fixed hours commitment each semester to the work of the fellowship identifying human rights needs in our community and activating the legal community toward real sustained solutions.

To be considered, applicants must first be admitted to the entering Class of 2015.  Upon admission to the School of Law, students may then submit their resume plus a one-page interest statement to Dean Henry Cantu at henry.cantu@louisville.edu with the subject line “Human Rights Fellowship Application.” 

The interest statement should identify what human rights issues you see in your own home community and how you think a community of lawyers could better work together to resolve those issues. Applications are due by May 1, 2015 for priority consideration.
 

Professor Arnold to speak at MIT’s interdisciplinary water symposium


Professor Tony Arnold has been invited to speak at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on a panel for an interdisciplinary water symposium titled, “Redefining Water Challenges.”
 
The symposium is co-sponsored by water programs at MIT and Tufts University and will focus on new interdisciplinary research collaborations. The symposium will be held May 1-2 on the MIT campus in Cambridge, Mass.  

Additionally, Professor Arnold is co-author of an article that has been accepted for publication by Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, which is ranked No. 3 in the world in the field of environmental science and No. 6 in the world in the field of ecology. The article is titled ""Barriers and Bridges to the Integration of Social-Ecological Resilience and Law."

It is the product of an interdisciplinary collaboration among 11 environmental scientists and legal scholars.