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Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Professor Levinson hiring summer research assistants

Professor Levinson and a co-author at Vanderbilt Law School, Professor O’Hara O’Connor, are hiring research assistants for summer 2015. They are working on a project involving labor arbitration awards. The research assistants will be coding labor arbitration awards and related court documents and decisions. 

Ideal candidates include those with a familiarity with labor law, employment law, or arbitration. Coding also requires someone who is very detail oriented because it involves answering long series of questions about the awards and other documents and entering the responses, which are often numeric, into an excel spreadsheet. There will be a training session before coding begins.

Research assistants are paid $8.50 an hour through financial aid. Available funds will cover one full-time position for approximately 5 weeks or multiple part-time positions. If you are interested in applying, please submit an application to a.levinson@louisville.edu by Friday, April 17 at 5 p.m. 

A complete application includes 1) a CV, 2) an unofficial transcript, and 3) a statement explaining a) why you are interested in the project, b) what strengths you have that make you a good fit for the project, c) the number of weeks and hours/week that you could commit to working over the summer, and d) whether you would be interested in continuing to work on the project during the academic year.

Professor Smith headed to China for two IP presentations

Professor Lars Smith will be in China from April 16-21 to give two presentations, including:

  • A speech on U.S. Regulation of Bitcoins at the 2015 IPR Nanhu Forum, International Conference on “Building a Powerful IPR Country” and
  • A lecture at China University of Political Science and Law on U.S. Trademark Law.
The Nanhu Forum is a national conference on intellectual property sponsored by the university where Smith did his Fulbright in 2011, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law. The conference alternates each other year between Wuhan, China, where Zhongnan is located, and another host city. This year, the conference is being held in Nanjing, at the IP School of Nanjing University of Science and Technology.

The second item is a lecture being hosted by the China University of Political Science and Law. Smith was invited to give a lecture on U.S. Trademark law by Dr. Nan Zhang, a Chinese IP scholar.

Additionally, Professor Smith spoke at the 2015 IP Scholars Roundtable at Drake University Law School in March.

Professor McNeal to speak at LSAC’s Diversity Retention Conference

Professor Laura McNeal has been invited to speak at the Law School Admissions Council’s Diversity Retention Conference on Wednesday in Las Vegas. She will speak about why diversity is critical to legal education, as well as ways to increase the diversity pipeline at law schools.
 
“It’s important that the legal field is representative of society. In order to best serve our clients, we have to understand the importance of diversity and the role we can play in minimizing bias and ensuring everyone has equal representation, regardless of race, gender, economic status, religion or sexual orientation,” Professor McNeal said.

More information is available on the LSAC website.

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Diversity Committee concluding inequality series with gender bias discussion

The Diversity Committee’s three-part series on inequality will conclude April 7 from noon to 2 p.m. in the Cox Lounge with a program titled, “From the Classroom to the Boardroom: A Discussion about Gender Bias.”

The series was created to encourage discourse around the intersection of race, gender and equality in America.

Tuesday’s event will feature speakers including Chris Hartman and Attica Scott, as well as Professor Anibal Rosario Lebron, a gender scholar. The program will focus on understanding and identifying examples of explicit and implicit bias on the basis of sex, gender and sexual orientation. It will also uncover and challenge attendees’ biases and feature discussion on how to actively identify solutions and action steps.

Professor Jamie Abrams said these types of discussions are needed to help our students become savvier in identifying bias and challenging it.

"Strong lawyers need to identify bias and challenge it to advocate for their clients. While a family court wouldn't automatically give custody to mom as it once did, might a court inject gender bias in how it considers the parenting of an attorney father working long hours compared to an attorney mother working long hours?  Might a court inject bias in how it restricts visitation when one parent is dating a person of the same sex compared to a person of the opposite sex? Might juries see injuries to male physical laborers differently than they see injuries to women administrative or clerical workers?  Gender bias is all around us and it impacts the study of law and the professional world our students will enter. It impacts classrooms, boardrooms and courtrooms,” she said.

This event is being co-sponsored by the Women’s Law Caucus and Lambda Law.
Lunch from Cafe Fraiche will be served.  

This series kicked off in January with a discussion on race inequality titled, “The Road Beyond Michael Brown’s Ferguson and Eric Garner’s Staten Island.”

A second program in the series was held in March on economic inequality titled, “Our Country, Appalachia, and the Never-Ending Path to Poverty."

Photo provided by Wikimedia.

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two
credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.