Library News

Law Library Fall Hours

The Law Library's Fall semester schedule begins Monday, August 18. The library will generally be open from 8 AM to 11 PM Monday's thru Thursday's, 8 AM to 6 PM on Friday's, 9 AM to 6 PM on Saturday's and 1 PM to 11 PM on Sunday's. 

Please note that in addition Labor Day (September 1), the Law Library is closed on Sunday, August 24, due to traffic issues caused by the annual Iron Man triathalon. 

Self-Service Scanner in Law Library

Two self-service scanners are now available in the Law Library's Reading Room. Each provides an affordable alternative to the photocopiers. 

If you have a mobile device, CamScanner is a useful app for scanning and managing documents as well as the library's scanner.

Employee Spotlight: Bailey Schrupp

Next up is rising "Fightin' 3L" Bailey Schrupp. She's the President of the Environmental Law & Land Use Society and Notes Editor of the Journal of Animal and Environmental Law . In addition to working in the law library, Bailey's got a busy summer ahead serving as the Donan Energy Law Fellow and volunteering as a Coordinator for the Jefferson County Teen Court Program. 

What’s your hometown?

Radcliff, Kentucky

Where did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?

Campbellsville University, Political Science major and History minor 

What led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?

I either want to go on to get my masters of Library Science and become a law librarian or I want to get my LLM in Environmental Law and then work for the State or Federal Goverment doing environmental work.

What do you enjoy about working in the law library?

The books! I am history nerd so any time I get to shelve older treatises downstairs I end up reading them.

What’s your favorite book?

It would be impossible to pick one, but my favorites are The Harry Potter series, The Great Gatsby, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Angels & Demons by Dan Brown. I also liked , "I am Malala" by Malala Yousafzai. 

Do you have a favorite quote?

"Why, sometimes I've believed six impossible things before breakfast". ~Alice in Wonderland

If you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?

If we are talking historical figures I would say JFK or Jackie Kennedy. If not then it would have to be Reese Witherspoon or Emma Watson. 

Do you have any pets?

I have a toy poodle named Choco and two cats, Kelsey and Leonardo Da Vinci (we call him Leo though).
 

 

 

 

Spring Bar Publications

Here's a review of recent law school related news from the Louisville and Kentucky Bar Associations.

In the June 2014 issue of the Louisville Bar Association's Bar Briefs, Dean Susan Duncan reports on how the "Law School's Strategic Plan Benefits from Legal Community Input" and outlines its mission on page 6.

Highlights from the LBA's May 2014 Bar Briefs include:

  • "Professor Ed Render's Legacy Lives on at the UofL School of Law" by Dean Duncan and Professor Jones (page 6)
  • "Labor & Employment Moot Court Team Enjoys Unprecedented Success" (page 6)
  • "OSHA & Workers' Compensation: Beware Conflating the Two" co-authored by Leah Rupp Smith, '13 (page 18)

More highlights from the LBA's April 2014 Bar Briefs include:

  • Dean Duncan's "Spotlight on UofL School of Law's Environmental Law Education" (page 6)
  • "Getting to the Know the Professor: Q&A with Professor Tom "Fitz" FitzGerald" (page 6)
  • Props for the law school's adjunct professors (page 6)
  • "No Money, Mo' Problems: Researching Federal and State Budgets"

Highlights from the Kentucky Bar Association's May 2014 Bench & Bar include: 

  • "UofL Alumni Serve as Role Models for Future Lawyers in 'Kentucky's' Global Economy" (page 20)
  • "Transactional Lawmeet Team Wins the Regional Competition" (page 20)
  • "On the Move" (page 70)

In the March 2014 issue of the KBA's Bench & Bar, Dean Duncan writes about "The Importance of Municipal Law Society" and touts the faculty's service and leadership in several local civic organizations (page 22). Assistant Professor of Justice Administration, Michael Losavio, reviews "A Basics Handbook on Adobe Acrobat: Adobe Acrobat in One Hour for Lawyers" on page 25. The bi-monthly "On the Move" column beginning on page 54 features news about many of our law school's graduates. Lastly, Ed Render is remembered on page 64.

Both publications are available in the law library. 

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 4

Law Library Faculty & Staff Honored

On May 19, faculty members were recognized for their service to the University of Louisville with an awards ceremony at the University Club. Public Services Librarian, Robin Harris, was honored for 30 years of service and  Law Library Director, David Ensign, was honored for 25 years of service.  

Full Story: "Faculty Service Awards add up to more than 1,700 years of service" (UofL Today, May 27, 2014)

In other news, Library Assistant, Marcus Walker, recently received a Masters in Library Science from the University of Kentucky and Circulation Assistant, Jerome Neukirch, was named the law school's Employee of the Month for April 2014.

 

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 3

The latest issue of our SSRN Research Paper series features publications from Professors Campbell, Lebron, Sweeny and Weaver.

 More information about the RPS:

Law Library Summer Schedule

The Law Library has returned to its summer schedule. It will be open until 9PM Sunday through Thursday and will close at 6PM on most Friday's and Saturday's.

Readers and Writers Unite at the Kentucky Women’s Book Festival

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival endeavors to foster a deeper interest in Kentucky women writers and encourage beginning writers to continue their work and strive to grow with each new venture.  Kentucky writers include those born in Kentucky but now living elsewhere, if they wish to be identified as Kentuckians, as well as those who, although not born here have made Kentucky home.

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival is held on the 3rd Saturday of May. This year it marks the 8th annual festival and will be on May 17, 2014 in the Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville. The event is free and open to all. If you would like to purchase a lunch, please call the Women’s Center  by May 13 (502) 852-8976 by May 13. (The lunch is $16 and catered by Masterson’s. Those who do not wish to purchase a lunch may still come to the reading.)

Doors open at 9:00 with refreshments and discussion, then the speakers begin in the Elaine Chao Auditorium at 9:30 with George Ella Lyon who will  discuss and read from her new book of poetry: Many-Storied House, followed by Bobbie Ann Mason who will read from her latest novel: The Girl in the Blue Beret. There are three consecutive morning sessions: Sonja de Vries, a poet; Alison Atlee, an author; and Jannene Winstead & Leborah Goodwin who have compiled a cookbook with a bit of Louisville history: Recipes and recollections: from the houses Samuel M. Plato Built. Holly Goddard Jones will do a lunchtime reading from her novel The Next Time You See Me. After lunch is a presentation by Sena Jeter Naslund entitled “Knowing the Self Through Knowing the Other,” which will feature the research for her latest novel The Fountain of St. James Court; or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman, then two more consecutive sessions: Mariam Williams will discuss “Black Arts Movement Pride, Walker’s Womanism and Hillbilly Sisterhood: the African American Women’s Literary Series in the 1990s” and Playwrights Nancy Gall-Clayton & Kathi E. B. Wlllis will present “When Characters Speak.”

Book purchase and signing will be available throughout the day. For more information, see the KWBF website or read about it in the Women’s Center’s spring 2014 newsletter. The festival ends at 3:30.

Source: UofL Libraries Blog

Employee Spotlight: Michael Atkinson

Welcome to the first installment of the law library's Employee Spotlight series, which we're sure will become as wildly popular as Stephen Colbert's Better Know a District.

First up is "Fightin' 3L" Michael Atkinson who has been a student worker since his second semester of law school. While serving as the SBA's Historian and earning Top Grades in three classes, he also managed to perform 365 hours of public service, which earned him the  Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Award and solidified his super hero law student status.

What’s your hometown?

Jeffersonville, Indiana

Where did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?
Indiana University Southeast, and I majored in Political Science and International Studies.

What led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?
At IUS I took a class in Constitutional Rights and Liberties, focusing primarily on the First Amendment. I very much enjoyed discussing constitutional issues, and so decided to go to law school to continue that discussion. After law school I plan work in a field relating to legal research and writing, and eventually pursuing a Master of Library Science degree, as I am interested in becoming a law librarian someday.

What do you enjoy about working in the law library?
The books, for one. Especially when I get to shelve the Supreme Court briefs in the attic with all the other historical volumes. At times I have to remind myself I'm supposed to be shelving the books and not reading them.

What’s your favorite book?
It's very hard to pick just one, but one of my favorites is The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. I particularly enjoyed his sense of wit and random hilarity. My other favorites include The Lord of the Rings trilogy, David Copperfield, The Remarkable Journey of Prince Jen by Lloyd Alexander, and The Pushcart War by Jean F. Merrill.

Do you have a favorite quote?
"Everybody was a baby once, Arthur. Oh, sure, maybe not today, or even yesterday. But once. Babies, chum: tiny, dimpled, fleshy mirrors of our us-ness, that we parents hurl into the future, like leathery footballs of hope. And you've got to get a good spiral on that baby, or evil will make an interception!" ~The Tick.

If you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?
Assuming we're referring to real people and not fictional, I would very much like to have a conversation with the aforementioned Douglas Adams and J.R.R. Tolkien. I would also invite Rowan Atkinson (aka Mr. Bean) , Patrick Stewart, and Jennifer Lawrence.   

Is there anything else you’d like to share?
I have a *blog, hypotheticallywriting.wordpress.com, where I write stories featuring random characters (like the heroic superhero Captain Happily Married) dealing with events such as zombie penguin apocalypses. I've also written a short story and several novels, which I self-published through Amazon.

*Editor's Note: In addition to his fictional short-stories, Michael has also journaled about his Law School Adventures.