Library News

University of Louisville Yearbooks

Full-text searchable digital versions of University of Louisville Yearbooks from 1909 to 1950 are now available online. Others (through the final edition in 1982) will be added in the coming months.  

University of Louisville students produced their first yearbook, The Colonel, in 1909. The Colonel apparently ceased publication after the 1912 edition, leaving a gap in the documentation of student life until 1922, when its successor, The Kentucky Cardinal, began monthly publication during the school year, with the June edition serving as a de facto yearbook. By 1924, the school year-end annual edition of The Kentucky Cardinal had been renamed The Thoroughbred, a title which lasted until 1972, despite a somewhat sporadic publishing record (no issues were produced in 1932, 1934-1938, 1943, 1945-1946, and 1970-1971).

During and after World War II two small publications were created to fill the gap while The Thoroughbred was on hiatus: The Key (1943) and The Class Cards (1946). The Thoroughbred Magazine briefly replaced the yearbook from 1969-1971, with multiple issues (four the first year and three thereafter) including poetry in addition to photographs. The Thoroughbred yearbook reappeared in 1972 for one last time, then, after another year without a yearbook (1973), it was replaced by The Déjà Vu (1974-1976). After another gap (1977-1978), the last major attempt at a UofL yearbook, Minerva, was produced from 1979-1980 and again in 1982 (there is no 1981 yearbook).

This digital collection contains full-text searchable digital versions of University of Louisville yearbooks. The yearbooks are being scanned in chronological order, and the digital collection will be updated in phases as groups of scans are completed and cataloged. Magazines (such as The Kentucky Cardinal monthly publications and The Thoroughbred quarterly publications) and yearbooks for individual schools (such as the School of Dentistry’s Plugger and the School of Law’s Jeffersonian) are not intended for inclusion at this time.

The collection includes several images of the law school building and photographs from the aforementioned yearbooks and publications. The best means for locating these items is to visit the collection's homepage and enter "law" in the search box labeled "Search the Yearbooks", then click Go.

Eastern Pkwy Reopens

Kentucky's Transportation Cabinet will embark upon a three-phase construction project to some of the main thoroughfares on the eastern and southern borders of Belknap Campus. Construction will begin in late August and is expected to be completed by the end of December. Enhancements to the area will include bike lanes, structurally enhanced bridges, increased safety, better signage, and a landscaped median. 

The law school will be most impacted by Phase II that involves a major redesign of the portion of Eastern Parkway nearest Third Street. During that period, access along Eastern Parkway will be restricted. Visitors are encouraged to approach from either Third Street (west) or Cardinal Boulevard (north). Some of the spaces in the red, green, and blue parking lots will be temporarily relocated. TARC bus #29 will be rerouted at Crittenden Drive. The Black Loop will not be impacted.

Update, 6/21: Eastern Parkway between Third Street and the entrance to the Speed School of Engineering parking lot will be blocked off Tuesday morning, June 22, from about 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. for the dedication and opening of the renovated Eastern Parkway bridge. The lot is accessible via Brook and Warnock streets during the ceremony. Gov. Steve Beshear, U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, Metro Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson and other state and local officials will join UofL President James Ramsey for the ribbon-cutting ceremony. UofL Provost Shirley Willihnganz and student Preston Bates also will represent the university at the event. Eastern Parkway will be opened for traffic immediately following the ceremony. Old Eastern Parkway, which runs under the bridge, will remain closed until about July 1.


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June Bar Briefs

Here are some highlights from the June 2010 issue of the Louisville Bar Association's Bar Briefs publication.

  • "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Due Process" by Rebecca J. O'Neill, '09
  • "A Father's Tale" by Laurel S. Doheny, '92, LBA President
  • "Present Tense" by Jim Chen 
  • "New Wyatt Fellow Named to Help at Legal Aid" featuring Tracey Leo Darbro, '09

A copy is available in the library's reserves.

Summer Library Hours

During the summer, May 15 to August 15, the law library will generally be open from 8 AM - 9 PM Monday thru Thursday, 8 AM - 6 PM Friday, 9 AM - 6 PM Saturday and 1 PM - 9 PM Sunday. Please refer to our Library Hours for exceptions.

Wayne Williams' Art Exhibit

Artist Wayne Williams has generously loaned many of the colorful paintings on exhibit in the Reading Room and elsewhere in the Law Library. Mr. Williams is a retired art instructor at St. Xavier High School.
 

20 Minutes about the Kentucky Women's Book Festival

On May 15, women writers and readers from around Kentucky will gather at the University of Louisville's Ekstrom Library for the Kentucky Women's Book Festival to talk books, poems, short stories and other types of writing.

The festival, now in its fourth year, is a unique opportunity for writers and readers to meet face to face and talk about their craft. Speakers at this year's festival include Affrilachian author Crystal Wilkinson and Sarah Gorham, president of Sarabande Books. Sessions are free to attend, but lunch is $16 and requires advance reservations. Register by calling 502-852-8976.

UofL Today caught up with Women’s Center director Mary Karen Powers, one of the event’s organizers, to talk about the festival.

Read the full story: "20 Minutes about the Kentucky Women's Book Festival" by Brandy Warren (UofL Today, April 21, 2010)

Alumna Attends National Conference on Public Libraries and Access to Justice

FRANKFORT, Ky., Feb. 3, 2010 - State Law Librarian Jennifer Frazier, '01, was a member of a three-person Kentucky team that recently participated in a national conference about how public libraries can improve online access to legal information at libraries. The team was one of the 15 teams chosen to attend the conference out of the 42 teams that applied from 31 states. Frazier's teammates were Terry L. Manuel, branch manager of program development for the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, and Marc Theriault, a law and technology projects manager for the Legal Aid Society of Louisville.

The Conference on Public Libraries and Access to Justice took place Jan. 11-12 in Austin, Texas, and was hosted by the Self-Represented Litigation Network in cooperation with the Legal Services Corp. The Self-Represented Litigation Network is hosted by the National Center for State Courts. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded the conference.

"The conference was a great start toward improving access to justice through libraries," Frazier said. "By bringing together public librarians and members of the legal aid community, the conference opened a door of communication between groups that might not think to work together. This communication will benefit everyone by resulting in us better serving self-represented litigants. The number of individuals acting as their own legal counsel in Kentucky has increased and will continue to grow."

During the conference, the teams learned about a broad range of customer-friendly legal resources available in print and online that have been developed by courts, bar associations, law libraries and legal aid programs that support people who do not have access to legal aid or counsel. Participants learned how to access the resources, assist in getting libraries and legal agencies to share them and take part in enhancing and customizing the resources.

The conference was a unique opportunity for participants to meet with public librarians and legal and court experts to discuss strategies for integrating access to legal information into their programs. This included how to best locate content and tools, talk about the content with library patrons, work with content partners to ensure that needed content is developed, share what they learned statewide and use successful programs to advocate for the importance of public libraries as gateways to government institutions.

"Public libraries are critical access points to government institutions," according to the Self-Represented Litigation Network. "As times get tougher, it becomes more and more important that people have libraries where they can find out how to protect their rights and navigate the complexities of our society."

In addition to the Kentucky team, teams selected to attend the conference were from California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

As head of the State Law Library of Kentucky, Frazier oversees an operation that provides research and reference assistance to the Kentucky Court of Justice and houses the central collection of legal research materials for state government.

Frazier has served as the state law librarian since September 2006. She joined the state law library as its legal counsel in March 2003 and served as the assistant state law librarian from April 2005 until she was named the state law librarian. She practiced law in Louisville for a year and a half before coming to the State Law Library. She earned her juris doctor from the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law in 2001 and received her master's degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Kentucky in 2007. Frazier earned her bachelor's degree in history from Northern Kentucky University.

What's New In the Library

August 2009 Flood Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the morning of August 4, 2009, record-breaking rains fell in central Louisville and surrounding counties between 7 am and 10 am EDT, with reported hourly rainfall rates as high as 8.83 inches. The Louisville Free Public Library's main branch and the University of Louisville's Belknap and Health Sciences campuses were particularly hard hit by the deluge.

The University of Louisville Libraries recently launched the August 2009 Flood Collection. It's their first community-created collection containing digital videos and selected images, including some taken of the law library, and is devoted to documenting one of the worst floods in Louisville's history.

In an effort to preserve images recorded by community members during and after the flood, an archived community collection documenting the storm and its aftermath was created. In addition to preserving multimedia files donated by community members, the University of Louisville Libraries entered into a partnership with Archive-It to preserve web-based content relating to the flash flood.

New Books Have Arrived