Staff News

Today: "From Brown to the Present: The Road Beyond Michael Brown’s Ferguson and Eric Garner’s Staten Island"

Please join us for the first Diversity Program of the Spring 2015 semester, From Brown to the Present: The Road Beyond Michael Brown’s Ferguson and Eric Garner’s Staten Island: A Conversation about ‘What it Means to be ColorBrave,” Tuesday, January 27.

Click here for complete information and details.

Sayed Kashua Lecture and Discussion

The University of Louisville Jewish Studies Program warmly invites you to hear novelist, journalist, and screenwriter Sayed Kashua on "The Foreign Mother Tongue: Living and Writing as a Palestinian in Israel" at 3 p.m. on Thursday, February 12, 2015, in the Chao Auditorium of Ekstrom Library.  For reservations: https://sayed-kashua.eventbrite.com

Law Library spotlights Louisville's role in civil rights trial

 

 

In October, the Brandeis School of Law’s Allen Court Room hosted a reenactment of the sensationalized Carl Braden trial of 1954, in which Braden was sentenced to 15 years in prison for sedition after he and his wife Anne purchased a home for an African American family in the Louisville area that is now Shively. The reenactment was part of a series of events to mark the 60th anniversary of the Wade/Braden story, which quickly became a formative event for Louisville and the nation as citizens grappled with a fledgling Civil Rights movement. 

To commemorate the trial – and the events leading up to it – UL’s Law Library is featuring the exhibit, “Black Freedom, White Allies & Red Scare: Louisville, 1954.” The closing date is set for Jan. 30. 

Also on that day, Professors Laura Rothstein and Jamie Abrams will host their classes in the library where Cate Fosl, director of the UofL Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, will provide an overview of the exhibit and historical context about the Braden/Wade story. Fosl is also Anne Braden’s biographer and her book, “Subversive Southerner” was a co-winner of the Oral History Association’s Book Award in 2003.

Sedition charges

The historical context essentially begins in March of 1954 when Andrew and Charlotte Wade ask whites Carl and Anne Braden to help purchase a home after realtors repeatedly refused to sell to the African American family. The Bradens closed on a home in what is now Shively in May and hand the keys over to the Wades who were the only African Americans in the neighborhood. 

Shortly after their move-in date, the Wade house was bombed and crosses were burned on the lawn. 

Carl and Anne Braden were subsequently accused of staging the purchase and bombing as part of a communist plot to take over the state government.

The case went to trial and Carl Braden was charged with sedition. At the time, working for racial integration was interpreted by many Southern whites to be an embrace of communism.  Braden was sentenced to 15 years and served eight months.

Unable to live in the damaged house and still facing harassment, the Wades, who had a toddler and a newborn at the time, moved out of their house.  

Following the trial, the Bradens continued to fight for social justice, supporting civil rights, desegregation and labor issues, among other efforts. They were both arrested numerous times while protesting and landed on the FBI investigation list because of their alleged ties to the Communist party. 

Carl Braden died in 1975. Prior to her death in 2006, Anne Braden was the University of Louisville’s first visiting scholar in Race and Gender Studies. 

The exhibit and its significance

The exhibit itself features photos and archival materials from the home purchase, the trial Carl Braden’s imprisonment, the years following the case and the events of the era that strongly influenced the case. The exhibit is the result of a collaboration between the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, the University of Louisville Archives & Special Collections, Louisville Free Public Library and Courier-Journal Media.

Robin Harris, public services librarian and professor of legal bibliography, said the exhibit is a good example of UL’s commitment to diversity. 

“Well before the topic of diversity became mainstream, the university was working on it and the law school in particular has been a leader in diversity efforts for more than 20 years. All of the deans have been committed,” Harris said. “This exhibit is not only a good example of that, but also a good example of its commitment to interdisciplinary studies.” 

The interdisciplinary angle comes from Fosl, who is a faculty member in the women’s and gender studies program within the College of Arts and Science. 

Harris adds that, from a historical perspective, the exhibit also provides a powerful narrative about a “seminal event” in Louisville and US history. 

“It’s been 60 years since this happened and it’s really important for people of all ages to know about this trial, from the purchase to the bombing to the trial, particularly from a law perspective,” Harris said. “We’re fortunate to have it here on display. It’s a fitting tribute to the role that Louisville had in the Civil Rights movement.” 

More information about the story is available on NPR’s “Here and Now,” available online.

The exhibit will next appear at the White Privilege Conference, March 11-15 at Louisville’s Galt House. 

Black Freedom, White Allies & Red Scare: Louisville, 1954

The Law Library is proud to be hosting the exhibit, “Black Freedom, White Allies & Red Scare: Louisville, 1954,” thanks to the generosity of the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research. This fascinating and moving chronicle of events leading up to and including Carl and Anne Braden’s sedition trial will be open to everyone through January 23, 2015.

If you did not see the exhibit when it was housed at the Louisville Free Public Library during the fall of 2014, you have another chance! Please stop by the Reading Room during any of the library’s operating hours.  And if you want to know more about the Braden’s story, the NPR show “Here and Now” recently ran a detailed story on the 60th anniversary of the case. 

Read more in "Law Library spotlights Louisville's role in civil rights trial".


 

Assistant Dean for IT Selected to Participate in the Provost’s 2015 Staff Leadership Academy

James A. Becker, assistant dean for information technology, has been selected to participate in the Provost’s 2015 Staff Leadership Academy, which gives participants knowledge related to university administration and assists them in developing leadership qualities to prepare them for future leadership roles, which they can apply in current and future positions at the university. Academy candidates are nominated by vice presidents and deans, chosen from among staff who serve or have served in supervisory or project management roles, demonstrated an interest in learning about leadership, and are forward thinkers who possess strong communication and critical thinking skills. The Academy consists of monthly workshops on leadership topics, group work to complete a capstone project, individual work with a mentor, and a graduation ceremony.

All Day Fundraiser for the Harlan Scholars at Señor Iguanas!

Treat yourself and give a little! Join the Harlan Scholars and Señor Iguanas on Thursday, December 4, 2014

from 11 AM – 10 PM for a day of eating and giving. When you eat at Señor Iguanas and mention giving to the Harlan Scholars, 10% of the proceeds will benefit the Harlan Scholar Program @ UofL. 

 

The Harlan Scholars Program is designed for select undergraduates @ UofL interested in careers in the law. Members are regularly invited to our law school, where they have opportunities to interact and network with current law students, law faculty, and members of the Louisville legal community. Your participation will help continue to grow the program. The Harlan Scholars Program is a Guaranteed Entrance Program.

 

For more information about the Harlan Scholars, please visit: http://louisville.edu/admissions/aid/gep/harlan

 

For more information about the fundraiser, please contact Marianna Michael, President of the Harlan Scholars, at marianna.michael@louisville.edu

All Day Fundraiser for the Harlan Scholars at Señor Iguanas!

Treat yourself and give a little! Join the Harlan Scholars and Señor Iguanas on Thursday, December 4, 2014
from 11 AM – 10 PM for a day of eating and giving. When you eat at Señor Iguanas and mention giving to the Harlan Scholars, 10% of the proceeds will benefit the Harlan Scholar Program @ UofL. 

The Harlan Scholars Program is designed for select undergraduates @ UofL interested in careers in the law. Members are regularly invited to our law school, where they have opportunities to interact and network with current law students, law faculty, and members of the Louisville legal community. Your participation will help continue to grow the program. The Harlan Scholars Program is a Guaranteed Entrance Program.
 
For more information about the Harlan Scholars, please visit: http://louisville.edu/admissions/aid/gep/harlan
 
For more information about the fundraiser, please contact Marianna Michael, President of the Harlan Scholars, at marianna.michael@louisville.edu
 

Tax Moot Court Team

The Moot Court Board congratulates Lee Wilson and Katie Halloran on making the the National Tax Moot Court Team. As members of the team, Lee and Katie will write a brief and present arguments as both petitioner and respondent. The competition will take place February 5-7, 2015, in Clear Water Florida. The team is coach by Professor Blackburn, Mark Hahn, and Laurie  McTighe.

KBA Criminal Law Reform - Third Annual Forum, November 7, Allen Courtroom

Dean DiSanza Leads Session Focused on Women in the Workplace at UMLaw

Since 2003, Dean DiSanza has been teaching at the University of Maryland School of Law (where she worked as Director of Student Affairs for six years and received her J.D.) in their “Women, Leadership, and Equality Program.” Based on concepts and theories she learned in her Master program at Johns Hopkins University, Dean DiSanza developed a three session program (later condensed to one session, once she had left UMLaw) that focused on the unique qualities women should consider when entering the workplace. She empowers the students with information about leadership theory, group theory and organizational behavior. She then weaves the issues of gender and equality into the mix. The purpose of this session is so students can assess current and future workplaces for cultures and norms. They are also given several self-evaluations to gauge their understanding of their own leadership and conflict resolution styles.