Staff News

Congratulations to Emily Harris and to Owen Lee Wilson

Congratulations to Emily Harris and to Owen Lee Wilson who were recently selected to represent the Law School as the 2014 Tax Moot Court Team.  The competition includes brief writing (due by 14 January 2014) and oral argument rounds starting Thursday, 6 February 1014, through Saturday, 8 February 2014, in Clearwater Beach, Florida.   Teams from about nineteen law schools will compete.  During all phases of the competition, teams are identified by number, not by their law school.  Separate awards will be given for brief writing and for oral argument. The team is coached by Professor Blackburn, Adjunct Professor Mark Hahn, and Laurie Beth McTighe, a member of the 2013 Tax Moot Court Team.

Imminent Change to ulsecure Wireless Network

From University IT, "Friday evening, November 29th, at approximately 10 p.m., IT will update UofL's wireless security certificate. This means you will need to accept the new certificate the next time you log on to the ulsecure wireless network."

Please visit http://louisville.edu/it/departments/communications/wireless/new-wireless-certificate-information-page for pertinent information and helpful screenshots.

Staff Honored for Outstanding Performance

On November 18, Rebecca Wenning, administrative associate at the Brandeis School of Law, received an Outstanding Performance Award for staff.  She was presented with a plaque and a check for $1,000 from President Ramsey and Provost Willihnganz at a reception at Amelia Place.

Wenning provides administrative support for the law school’s faculty, deans, staff and students. In that role, she supervises one employee and a research assistant in daily operations to provide exceptional customer service, produce accurate materials and effectively meet desired timelines. Wenning is the quintessential team player and always is willing to take on additional tasks that are not part of her job duties. She makes time to volunteer and is heavily involved in the UofL Cares campaign as well as Lawlapalooza, the legal community's annual “Battle of the Bands” fundraiser, and other events at the law school. Wenning always looks for ways to improve not only her skills but also the law school.

Simone Beach, Assistant Director of the Law Clinic, was one of three staff members who received an honorable mention.

Brandeis School of Law Hosts the ABA Regional Negotiation Competition

Forty competitors from law schools throughout the South and Midwest traveled to Louisville the weekend of November 9–10 to compete in an ABA Regional Negotiation Competition, hosted by the Brandeis School of Law.

Tulane University School of Law boasted the best results, as Team L from its law school took home first place, while Team F from Tulane finished in fourth place. Team J from Cumberland Law School at Samford University and Team D from the University of Mississippi College of Law finished in second and third place, respectively.

“I will say that the competitors always impress me in that they have developed relatively effective negotiation skills quickly. They usually only have three to four weeks to prepare for the regionals,” said UofL Law Professor and the Boehl Chair in Property and Land Use Tony Arnold, who served as the Regional Competition Administrator, the main organizer and administrator of the competition at the Brandeis School of Law. “But I always see negotiating methods that any good negotiator would emulate.”

According to the American Bar Association, the competition aims to showcase the legal negotiations skills of participating law students, who, acting as lawyers, negotiate a series of legal problems. The simulations consist of a common set of facts known by all participants and confidential information known only to the participants representing a particular side.

Fifty-five judges, composed of alumni, members of the legal community, and non-lawyer negotiators from the Louisville community dedicated their time and aided the competitors in their pursuit of practical professional skills development by giving feedback.

Arnold cited this reason as one of the most important benefits of the law school being able to serve as host for this competition, in addition to the opportunity for highlighting the strength of the negotiation program at the Brandeis School of Law, which has experienced success on the national stage in recent years, as well as sharing the beauty and rich history of a law school with former Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis’ presence so clearly felt around the building.  

Other regional competition hosts this year included William & Mary Law School, Emory University School of Law, the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, and the William Mitchell College of Law, where UofL’s two negotiation teams competed so as to avoid any perceived bias that may have resulted with a panel of judges from Louisville. The team of Ryan Ballard and Jeff Hellman placed 6th overall, while the team of Emily Peeler and Patrick Markey placed 9th overall, out of 24 teams. UofL Adjunct Professor Mary Jo Gleason was the coach, and Alex Russell was the alternate and student coach. 

The first place team from each regional competition, of which there are ten, will advance to the National Finals, which are scheduled for Feb. 7–8 in Chicago. Additional invitations will be extended to teams to create a multiple of four.

“All the students who participate as competitors each year, or even as alternates and student assistant coaches, benefit greatly in the development of their negotiation skills, regardless of whether they advance to nationals,” Arnold said. “It's a really great skills competition, and I'm glad that [the Brandeis School of Law] participate[s] regularly.”

Faculty Member and Student Present on Aging and Society

On November 9, 2013 Professor Jim Jones and 3L student Elizabeth Richardson presented at the International Conference on Aging and Society. They spoke about the effects of mental health care laws and policies on baby boomers and ensuring adequate mental health care. 

Lunch and Learn on Depression

"Did you know that attorneys have the highest rates of depression and suicide of any profession and 40% of law students in their third year of school report experiencing symptoms of depression."  The Dave Nee Foundation is sponsoring a program they believe will help save lives.  Come hear Katherine Bender of the Dave Nee Foundation and Professor Jim Jones discuss this important topic Thursday, November 14, at 11:50 a.m., in room 275.

KYLAP will be on hand, providing lunch and drinks, along with lawyer volunteers, to answer any questions or provide immediate assistance to anyone in distress.

Lost & Found October 2013

Lawlapalooza Raises Over $2500!

Lawlapalooza 2013 Photo Gallery @ Flickr

Magnolia Photo Booth Co. Gallery

Drum roll please... Lawlapalooza 2013: Law Is Calling yielded over $2500 from ticket sales, t-shirt sales, the silent auction and band tips! This tally does not include band registrations and sponsors. The funds will be used to support the Ellen B. Ewing Foundation

Battle of the Bands Winners:

Special thanks to The MC5 student emcees (Alexandria Bridges, Jessica Homer, Jeff Perkins, Chipper Peterson, and Corey Shiffman) and a big shout out to 3L, Greg Monzon and his band The Monzonites who performed the first ever Lawlapalooza guitar jam! They also took 3rd place in 2011 as Raisin Brandeis. Kudos to Jerome Neukirch of the Law Library as well for designing the poster and t-shirts.

UofL only Kentucky stop for King Center Imaging Project exhibit

In October 1960, Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. sat in the Fulton County, Ga., jail although the charges brought against him had been dropped. Louisvillians Carl and Anne Braden were outraged and sent King a telegram of support on Oct. 24.

That telegram and more documents related to Louisville and other parts of Kentucky are part of the King Center’s online digital archive. JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s Technology for Social Good program made the archive possible.

The University of Louisville will host a traveling exhibit about the imaging project and archive Oct. 21 through Oct. 25 in the east lobby of Ekstrom Library. Hours are 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., Oct. 21; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Oct. 22 through Oct. 24; and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 25. Admission is free and public.

The interactive exhibit showcases digital images of key documents from King’s correspondence, speeches and sermons. Playing off King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, visitors also can write their dreams on a card and post them on the Dream Wall section of the exhibit. The cards later will be digitized and saved for posterity as part of The King Center’s archive.

UofL is the only Kentucky stop on the exhibit’s current schedule. The exhibit’s content dovetails with UofL’s new multi-year initiative, Project Progress. Starting later this month, the university will have special programming to look back and reflect on what was taking place in the Civil Rights Movement each year from 1963 to 1968 and then look at where society is now.

For more information, contact Janene Zaccone, (502) 852-6171.

Professor Trucios-Haynes Moderates Discussion with Congressman John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis, Georgia’s 5th Congressional District Representative, is the only speaker at the 1963 March on Washington still living today and the author of “March,” a graphic novel. In 2000, Congressman Lewis was the recipient of the Brandeis Medal. Pictured here are Professor Trucios-Haynes with Congressman Lewis and her students, Zackary McKee, Stephany Hunter, and Iman Jackson following the October 15 on campus visit. Four students from the Central High School Law and Government Magnet program, along with magnet teacher Joe Gutmann, were also invited guests to the on-campus visit. Professor Trucios-Haynes moderated the afternoon program. This event was part of Congressman Lewis's visit to Louisville for the Kentucky Author Forum where he shared his remarkable story as one of the key figures of the Civil Rights Movement. At the evening event, Congressman Lewis was interviewed by Rachel Maddow.

 

The event provided those present to see first hand why John Lewis is such an icon for the civil rights movement and how his energy, commitment, and dedication, continue to inspire all Americans to advocate for social justice and civil rights.