Staff News

Lost & Found October 2013

Lawlapalooza Raises Over $2500!

Lawlapalooza 2013 Photo Gallery @ Flickr

Magnolia Photo Booth Co. Gallery

Drum roll please... Lawlapalooza 2013: Law Is Calling yielded over $2500 from ticket sales, t-shirt sales, the silent auction and band tips! This tally does not include band registrations and sponsors. The funds will be used to support the Ellen B. Ewing Foundation

Battle of the Bands Winners:

Special thanks to The MC5 student emcees (Alexandria Bridges, Jessica Homer, Jeff Perkins, Chipper Peterson, and Corey Shiffman) and a big shout out to 3L, Greg Monzon and his band The Monzonites who performed the first ever Lawlapalooza guitar jam! They also took 3rd place in 2011 as Raisin Brandeis. Kudos to Jerome Neukirch of the Law Library as well for designing the poster and t-shirts.

UofL only Kentucky stop for King Center Imaging Project exhibit

In October 1960, Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. sat in the Fulton County, Ga., jail although the charges brought against him had been dropped. Louisvillians Carl and Anne Braden were outraged and sent King a telegram of support on Oct. 24.

That telegram and more documents related to Louisville and other parts of Kentucky are part of the King Center’s online digital archive. JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s Technology for Social Good program made the archive possible.

The University of Louisville will host a traveling exhibit about the imaging project and archive Oct. 21 through Oct. 25 in the east lobby of Ekstrom Library. Hours are 1 p.m. to 8 p.m., Oct. 21; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Oct. 22 through Oct. 24; and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Oct. 25. Admission is free and public.

The interactive exhibit showcases digital images of key documents from King’s correspondence, speeches and sermons. Playing off King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, visitors also can write their dreams on a card and post them on the Dream Wall section of the exhibit. The cards later will be digitized and saved for posterity as part of The King Center’s archive.

UofL is the only Kentucky stop on the exhibit’s current schedule. The exhibit’s content dovetails with UofL’s new multi-year initiative, Project Progress. Starting later this month, the university will have special programming to look back and reflect on what was taking place in the Civil Rights Movement each year from 1963 to 1968 and then look at where society is now.

For more information, contact Janene Zaccone, (502) 852-6171.

Professor Trucios-Haynes Moderates Discussion with Congressman John Lewis

Congressman John Lewis, Georgia’s 5th Congressional District Representative, is the only speaker at the 1963 March on Washington still living today and the author of “March,” a graphic novel. In 2000, Congressman Lewis was the recipient of the Brandeis Medal. Pictured here are Professor Trucios-Haynes with Congressman Lewis and her students, Zackary McKee, Stephany Hunter, and Iman Jackson following the October 15 on campus visit. Four students from the Central High School Law and Government Magnet program, along with magnet teacher Joe Gutmann, were also invited guests to the on-campus visit. Professor Trucios-Haynes moderated the afternoon program. This event was part of Congressman Lewis's visit to Louisville for the Kentucky Author Forum where he shared his remarkable story as one of the key figures of the Civil Rights Movement. At the evening event, Congressman Lewis was interviewed by Rachel Maddow.

 

The event provided those present to see first hand why John Lewis is such an icon for the civil rights movement and how his energy, commitment, and dedication, continue to inspire all Americans to advocate for social justice and civil rights.

Lawlapalooza T-Shirts and Tickets on Sale Now!

It's back, and it's here.  Lawlapalooza, the Louisville legal community's battle of the bands, returns this Thursday, October 17 at the Phoenix Hill Tavern, 644 Baxter Avenue.  Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Eight bands will compete, taking the stage on the half hour beginning at 6:30. To compete, each band must include at least one lawyer or law student, and this year, the Brandeis School of Law has two horses in the race: The Monzonites, featuring 3L Derek Monzon and 2013 grad Matt Doran, and defending champs The Subconscionables, featuring Associate Dean Tim Hall and Assistant Dean Jim Becker.

Does the world really need lawyers trying to rock? Well, yes, because Lawlapalooza is a wicked fun fundraiser for the Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Program. Proceeds benefit the Judge Ellen B. Ewing Foundation, which funds summer fellowships for Brandeis School of Law students to work in the areas of family law, domestic violence and spouse abuse, and HIV/AIDS.

Bonus: Five of your fellow students -- Alexandria Bridges and Jessica Homer, pictured at left in this year's very cool Lawlapalooza t-shirt, and Jeff Perkins, Chipper Peterson and Corey Shiffman are hosting the event as MCs. Come out and support the home team!

T-shirts and tickets will be on sale in the Mosaic Lobby one more time:TODAY, Wednesday, Oct. 16, from 11:30 am to 1:00 pm They're also on sale in the Law Resource Center (Room 272), Monday through Thursday, 8 am - 5:30 pm, or get your ticket at the door. Each is only ten bucks, and the first 100 students through the door get their first drink free, compliments of Westlaw (so bring your student ID, too).

So, come out and mingle with Louisville's legal community, hear some great music, have fun with friends in our new-this-year photo booth, and have an amazing time at Lawlapalooza 2013.

 

Professor Jim Jones Spotlighted by ABA Commission on Disability Rights

The American Bar Association Commission on Disability Rights has recognized Professor James T.R. Jones for his professional accomplishments while combatting bipolar disorder life-long.  Since publicly disclosing his illness in 2007, and describing it in his 2011 memoir, A Hidden Madness, Professor Jones has become an advocate for others in the legal profession who also struggle with mental illness and its stigma.

Read the full profile of Professor Jones and learn more about his moving story. 

Prof. Lewis' Dec. Estates cancelled Monday only

Professor Lewis's Decedents' Estates class is cancelled today, Monday, October 14.  Class will be held on Wednesday.

Law Resource Center Hours - Oct. 14-18

Law Resource Center Hours - Oct. 14-18, 2013

Monday-Thursday - 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Friday - 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

 

 

Public health, law schools to host forum on HIV, criminal prosecutions

HIV criminalization refers to criminal statutes that apply only to people with HIV, and the sometimes heightened sentences people with the disease face in court. This is a topic of concern among public health organizations and HIV policy leaders.

In an effort to join the conversation, the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences and the UofL Louis D. Brandeis School of Law will host a free public forum Oct. 2 at the Louisville Metro Department of Health and Wellness, 400 E. Gray St.

“The degree to which we as a community accept diversity goes a long way in determining our collective quality of life,” said UofL School of Public Health and Information Sciences Dean Craig Blakely. “Part of the university’s mission is to provide teachable moments, and this forum provides an educational opportunity to stimulate discussion about a complex topic that impacts subsets of our community differently.”

Kentucky Department for Public Health HIV/AIDS Program Branch Manager Karen Sams and UofL law professor Samuel A. Marcosson will provide the health and legal context of this multi-faceted issue.

“Social justice is the cornerstone of our law school,” said Susan Duncan, Dean of the Brandeis School of Law. “That’s one of the reasons we are especially pleased to contribute to this important forum, and we want to do our part to help the public better understand what it means to be HIV positive.”

Speakers also will include organizers of the Sero Project, Sean Strub and Robert Suttle. Strub will discuss his perspective on HIV criminalization and why he advocates for reform, while Suttle will share his personal story of prosecution and incarceration on a nondisclosure charge in Louisiana. His story is portrayed in the short film HIV is Not a Crime, which will be shown the night of the forum.

LGBT Center Director and Assistant Provost for Diversity Brian Buford said Pride Week, UofL’s celebration of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, is a great time to engage in these conversations.

“The idea that people with HIV can face criminal charges for how and when they disclose their status may come as a surprise to many, even some in the LGBT community—that is why it’s important to host a public dialogue. The awareness of threats can be the catalyst for improvement,” Buford said.

The forum begins with a reception at 5:30p.m., followed by presentations at 6 p.m. Other event partners are the UofL LGBT Center, the Graduate Program in Bioethics & Medical Humanities, the ACLU of Kentucky and the Fairness Campaign.

Source: UofL Today (September 26, 2013)

Law School to co-host forum on HIV, criminal prosecutions

HIV criminalization refers to criminal statutes that apply only to people with HIV, and the sometimes heightened sentences people with the disease face in court. This is a topic of concern among public health organizations and HIV policy leaders.

In an effort to join the conversation, the University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences and the Law School will host a free public forum at 5:30 on Oct. 2 at the Louisville Metro Department of Health and Wellness, 400 E. Gray St.

Kentucky Department for Public Health HIV/AIDS Program Branch Manager Karen Sams and Professor Sam Marcosson will provide the health and legal context of this multi-faceted issue.