Student News

Wednesday at Noon: Christian Law Society Chili Fundraiser and Haiti Quake Relief

Don't bring your lunch on Wednesday! Instead, purchase a chili lunch (dessert and drink included) from the Christian Law Society in the lobby. Fifty percent of proceeds will go to the Samaritan's Purse Haiti Relief Fund. There will be a donation box for any extra contributions. The cost is $5.

Change in name of Career Services/Public Service website

Please note that the Career Services and Public Service portion of the law school website has been changed.  Instead of http://www.law.louisville.edu/career  it is:

http://www.law.louisville.edu/professionaldevelopment

Look for official changes the week of March 7th.

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

2011-12 Schedule: Tuesdays & Thursdays; Conflicting Courses

I have received several student inquiries about why we don't have classes scheduled 12:15 to 2:15 on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and why some core and required classes are scheduled at the same time.

The open time slots on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12:15 to 2:15 are there for student organization meetings, mandatory professionalism and bar-admission programs, make-up classes, informational sessions (e.g., 1L registration/advising, moot court, journals, dual degree programs), Partners in Professionalism programming, career services programs, Diversity Forums, guest speakers, major events, faculty meetings, and the like.  If these times weren't set aside without classes, it would be impossible to have all of these important and/or necessary programs without conflicting with students' and professors' obligations to be in class.  Already we are finding it difficulty to schedule major events that don't conflict with one another, even with 2 open slots.  And if we were to try to schedule a set of 1:00 p.m. Tuesday/Thursday classes, the period of 12:15 to 11:50 is too short.  Most law schools have open no-class time periods in their schedules for the same reasons.

Likewise, it is impossible to devise a schedule in which some required or core course sections aren't at the same time as others.  However, there are multiple sections of nearly all required or core courses.  Over the entire 2011-12 year, there are 4 sections of Basic Income Tax, 3 sections of Business Organizations, 3 sections of Decedents Estates, 3 sections of Evidence, 3 sections of Crim Pro I, 2 sections of Con Law I (and also 2 sections of Con Law II), 2 sections of Professional Responsibility, 2 sections of Secured Transactions, 2 sections of Crim Pro II, 2 sections of Conflict of Law, 2 sections of Estate & Gift Tax, 2 sections of Negotiable Instruments, and 1 section of Adminstrative Law.  While the precise numbers of sections offered may not be exactly the same from year to year, you should have a number of different options to take required and core courses over a 2-year period in your 2L and 3L years.  Likewise, there are a lot of different skills, perspective, and writing courses in the schedule, allowing flexibility in how you choose to meet those graduation requirements.

While most of you already know that selecting the courses you will take necessarily involves choices and trade-offs among multiple goals, the point bears repeating as you consider next year's schedule.  No law student in the U.S. is able to put together his or her "dream schedule"; everyone must make scheduling choices, because no schedule can be devised that meets all of the individual goals of a large, diverse set of students.  If you would like to talk over your options with me, Dean Bean, or Ms. Ballard, please make an appointment.  We would be glad to help you to think through your schedule options.

Dean Arnold

SBF Auction Is a Big Success

Photo Gallery

The Student Bar Foundation raised $6,000 at their 14th Annual Charity Auction on February 10! The money will be used to fund student fellowships or travel stipends for law-related public service work.

Another informal silent auction will be held February 28-March 1 for a few remaining unsold items.

The Student Bar Foundation will begin accepting applications for summer grants in early April. More information to follow.

U.S. Marines JAG Information Session

Captain Michael Masters will be presenting an Information Session at 11:30 a.m. in the Brandeis Room (112).  All interested students for summer intern and active duty positions are welcome to attend.

If you would like to learn more about opportunities with the U.S. Marines, go to:  http://officer.marines.com/marine/winning_battles/leadership_positions/law/judge_advocate

NOTICE REGARDING MILITARY RECRUITMENT 

In order to conduct job interviews in the law school or to obtain assistance from the Career Services Office, prospective emp loyers must sign a statement of nondiscrimination based on race, color, religion, nationality, gender, disability or sexual orientation.  Federal laws relating to military service preclude representatives of the Armed Forces from signing the nondiscrimination statement in its entirety.  Congress also has enacted a statute, known as the Solomon Amendment, requiring that federal funding -- including several categories of student loans -- be terminated at any educational institution that refuses access to military recruiters.  Therefore, the law school grants access to military recruiters who sign the nondiscrimination statement to the extent consistent with federal law.

Lawyers Mutual Insurance Agency seeking 3L students for research/development project

Lawyers Mutual Insurance Agency, LLC will pay $20 an hour for research and development of outlines for the following topics:

1.       Supervisory Professional Responsibilities

 KRPC 5.1 deals with the duty of partners, managers and supervisory lawyers to make sure that other lawyers under their supervision conform to ethical practices.  KRPC 5.3 deals with the duty of lawyers to make sure that non-lawyers assist (e.g., paralegals) who work for them likewise conform to ethical practices.  References to these rules is made in the Risk Manager Vol. 20, Issue 3 “Boss Professional Responsibility” and in the Bench & Bar magazine.

2.       Returning Client Files

Revised KRPC 1.16 makes it clear that a lawyer cannot make return of a client’s file contingent upon payment of his/her fees.  Still, there is a lot of confusion about this amongst some lawyers.  For example, it is permissible to withhold uncompensated work product from a client’s returned file in some circumstances.  Some definitive guidance would be useful.  Reference can be found in the Risk Manager Vol. 21, Issue 1 and in the Bench & Bar Magazine. 

 If interested, contact Nancy Meyers, Marketing Director at 568-6100 or meyers@lmick.com  

Exam4 for Mid-Term Exams

Exam4 for mid-term exams in Professor Hasselbacher's Introduction to Health Law and Professor Roberts' Basic Income Tax is now available.  Students in those classes should check their e-mail for more detailed information from each professor.

ABA Site Visit Meeting with Students

Beginning February 28, the American Bar Association (ABA) will send a site team to our law school to evaluate our faculty, staff, and students.  The purpose of the evaluation is to make sure that we are complying with the ABA's rules and regulations.  On Monday, February 28 at 5 p.m. and Tuesday, March 1 at 12 p.m. in room 275 the ABA site team will have meetings with our students.  You are encouraged to come to both meetings and discuss any issues that you feel are relevant to your enrollment as a student at the Brandeis School of Law.  Ask questions and feel free to make comments.  Pizza and soft drinks will be provided at both meetings.

ABA Site Visit Announcement

The American Bar Association is sending a site visit team to the Law School February 27-March 2 as part of the periodic accreditation review that every law school undergoes.  Please see the attached memo from Deans Arnold and Bean about why, what to expect, and what role you can play.  Thanks!

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Are You Being Efficient?

Time is a precious commodity in law school.  Law students are always looking for shortcuts, but shortcuts are not the answer.  Instead, you want to use your time more efficiently and effectively.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Learn the material as you read it rather than highlight it to learn later.  Ask questions while you read.  Make margin notes as you read.  Brief the case or make additional notes to emphasize the main points and big picture of the topic after you finish reading.  If you only do cursory "survival" reading, you will have to re-read for learning later which means double work.
  • Review what you have read before class.   By reviewing, you reinforce your learning.  You will be able to follow in class better.  You will recognize what is important for note taking rather than taking down everything the professor says.  You will be able to respond to questions more easily.  Your confidence level about the material will increase.
  • Be more efficient and effective in taking class notes.  Listen carefully in class.  Take down the main points rather than frantically writing or typing verbatim notes.  Use consistent symbols and abbreviations in your notes.  
  • Review your class notes within 24 hours.  Fill in gaps.  Organize the notes if needed.  Note any questions that you have.  If you wait to review your notes until you are outlining, you will have less recall of the material.
  • Regularly review material.   We forget 80% of what we learn in 2 weeks if we do not review.  Regular review of your outlines will mean less cramming at the end of the semester.  You save time ultimately by not re-learning.   You gain deeper understanding.  You have less stress at exam time.
  • Look for the big picture at the end of each sub-topic and topic.  Do not wait until pre-exam studying to pull the course together.  Synthesize the cases that you have read on a sub-topic: how are they different and similar.  Determine the main points that you need to cull from cases for the sub-topic or topic.  Analyze how the sub-topics or topics are inter-related.  If visuals help you learn, incorporate a flowchart or table or other graphic into your outline to show the steps of analysis and/or inter-relationships. 
  • Ask the professors questions as soon as you can.  Do not store up questions.  The sooner you get your questions answered, the greater your comprehension of current material.  New topics often build on understanding of prior topics.  Unanswered questions merely lead to more confusion and less learning.