Student News

Career Services/Public Service updates list of websites

Check out the new and improved list of websites on the Career Services portion of the law school website.  Follow "Current Students", "Job Banks" and "Websites".  You can also go to:    www.law.louisville.edu/careers/Job_Search

 This is a work in progress.  Please provide feedback on the format, which websites are useful/not useful, websites that should be added, additional categories, etc.  Thanks.

Academic Success Tip - Use the Facts!

You cannot perform legal analysis without discussing the facts.  There are few absolutes in law school, but including the facts in your answer to essay questions is one of them.  Remember, most law school essay questions are written in the form of a lengthy fact pattern or story.  The facts within these stories create the issues that you must discuss.  Almost every fact in these stories must be reproduced and discussed in your examination answer.  While it is true that your professors will know the facts in the problem, we do not know whether you understand which facts are relevant to resolving each issue.  Including the facts in your answer does not guarantee success on your law school exams, but excluding the facts guarantees that you will perform below your capabilities.

To ensure that the facts are making their way into your essay answers, place a line through each fact as you use it.  Do not cross the fact out so that it becomes illegible, however, because a single fact may be relevant to more than one issue.  After you finish your essay answer, look back at the fact pattern.  If there are facts left over, one of three things has occurred: (1) the facts are truly irrelevant and do not need to be discussed (unlikely!); (2) the facts are relevant to an issue or issues that you have already discussed; or (3) the facts are relevant to an issue that you have not addressed at all.

As for supposedly irrelevant facts, professors rarely place information into their fact patterns that does not need to be discussed.  Most “irrelevant” facts are there so that you can explain why they are irrelevant.  (Adapted from Succeeding in Law School by Herbert N. Ramy.)

FREE MASSAGES TODAY

Massage therapists from Advanced Massage Therapeutics will be offering chair massages for law students today.  Massages will be offered in the Washer Lounge from noon to 6:00 p.m.  Students are encouraged to sign-up for an appointment time.  Sign-up sheets are posted in the Washer Lounge.  This service is sponsored by your Student Bar Association and the Academic Success Office.

Academic Success Tip - Organizing Your Exam Answers

Before answering an essay question, you must outline and organize your response.  When the proctor says “Begin,” too many students read the first sentence in an essay exam question, recognize an issue, and are so overjoyed at finding an issue that they spend the next 20 minutes responding to it.  The problem with this approach is that the fact pattern was probably over a page long, and the writer just spent more time than was necessary in responding to a relatively straightforward issue.  While different students outline differently, students who perform well on law school exams take the time to read through the entire essay question, create a list of the various issues contained therein, and then take a few more minutes to separate out the major issues from the minor ones.  This approach will give you a better sense of how much time you have to complete your entire answer.  (Adapted from Succeeding in Law School by Herbert N. Ramy.)

Exam4 Practice Test Confirmations

The confirmation e-mail has been sent to all students who successfully submitted an Exam4 practice test before the 6:00 PM deadline on Friday, November 20.  Students who did not receive the confirmation e-mail will be refused technical assistance with Exam4 during finals should they attempt to use it and experience difficulties.

Extended Library Hours

During the exam period (November 30 - December 11), the law library will offer extended hours. Refer to the library hours schedule for details.

Harvard Law Professor to Speak on Campus

Michael Sandel, renowned Harvard professor and author of Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do?, will speak at the Chao Auditorium at 10 AM on December 1. Professor Sandel is also the featured guest of the Kentucky Author Forum later that evening at The Kentucky Center.

At the Kentucky Center, Professor Sandel will be interviewed by John S. Carroll, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and former editor of the Los Angeles Times, the Baltimore Sun, and the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Justice, or Moral Reasoning 22, a course in moral and political philosophy taught by Harvard Professor of Government, Michael Sandel, draws more than 1,200 students each year. Sandel speaks to a rapt audience, relating the big questions of political philosophy to the most current and vexing issues of the day. Visit www.justiceharvard.org for a taste of his exhilarating class.
 
His new book, Justice, offers readers the same exhilarating journey that captivates his students- the challenge of thinking our way through the hard moral challenges we confront as citizens, inviting readers of all political persuasions to consider familiar controversies in fresh and illuminating ways.

Click here for more details about the Kentucky Author Forum event.

Academic Success Tip - Exam Tip (Instructions)

Read the instructions!  This is the most obvious advice imaginable, but every exam period several students will, for example, answer 3 short exam questions, only to discover that the instructions said “provide an answer to 1 of the following 3 hypotheticals.”  Most students get flustered at the start of an exam, so this type of mistake is more common than you might imagine.  When the exam starts, take a deep breath, slow yourself down, and read the instructions.  Adapted from Succeeding in Law School by Herbert N. Ramy.

Congratulations to the Criminal Law Moot Court Team

Congratulations to Molly Mattingly and Ian Richetti for being selected to represent U of L at the Wechsler Criminal Law Moot Court Competition.  The team is coached by Ted Shouse and David Harshaw and will compete in late March in Buffalo, New York.  Louisville won back-to-back national championships in 1999 and 2000.

Free Massages for Law Students!

Massage therapists from Advanced Massage Therapeutics will be offering chair massages for law students on two days during finals - Monday, November 30 and Monday, December 7.  Massages will be offered in the Washer Lounge from noon to 6:00 p.m. each day.  Students are encouraged to sign-up for an appointment time.  Sign-up sheets are posted in the Washer Lounge.  This service is sponsored by your Student Bar Association and the Academic Success Office.