Student News

ACS Announces Constitutional Video Contest

The American Constitution Society is inviting members, supporters and others interested in the Constitution to enter the first ACS short video contest. The competition encourages submissions of original short films highlighting the importance of the federal judiciary, the need for independent judges, and the necessity of ensuring a fair and efficient judicial nomination process.

First prize is $1,500 and free registration to the 2010 ACS National Convention in Washington, D.C. on June 17 - 19. The second-place entrant will receive a $250 prize and free Convention registration.

The contest is intended to promote creative thinking about the importance of judges and the role courts play in shaping the laws that shape American lives. Entries should be consistent with the ACS Mission Statement and the themes of Keeping Faith with the Constitution, the book published last year by ACS, and available for free download, as well as other criteria.

"With this video contest, ACS is encouraging people to think creatively about the judiciary's critical role, and the importance of nominating and confirming jurists who embrace the fundamental values that our Constitution expresses: individual rights and liberties, genuine equality, access to justice, democracy and the rule of law," said Caroline Fredrickson, executive director of ACS.

Health Law Moot Court Competition Soliciting Interest

 The Moot Court Board is pleased to announce that selection of a team for the fall 2010 Health Law Moot Court Competition will take place during May and June.  At this time, we are soliciting names of students who may be interested in the Competition.

The problem for the Competition could involve any aspect of health law and/or procedural issues that may arise during litigation involving health law issues.  The problem generally arrives in early August, and the due date for the brief ordinarily is in late September or early October.  The Competition will be held November 5-6, 2010, at Southern Illinois University School of Law in Carbondale Illinois.

If you may be interested in being a team member and want to receive more detailed information about the Competition and the application/selection process, please send an email message to Marlow Riedling (mpried01@louisville.edu) by Friday April 30th, including your name and an email address that you will be checking regularly throughout May.  We look forward to hearing from you.

 

2010 - 2011 Moot Court Board Members Selected

The Moot Court Board would like to congratulate the following individuals who were selected as members for the forthcoming year:

Marlow Riedling

Liam Felsen

Lani Burt

Elisabeth Fitzpatrick

Todd Garland

Thomas Stevens

Tyler Fleck

Amanda Prager

Nancy Vinsel

Kristie Wetterer

Sarah Clay

Eric Johnson

Jennifer Siewertsen

Whitney Englert

Andrea Fagan

Sarah Potter

Alex White

Meg Stewart

Jackie Clowers

Joshua Porter

Megan Cleveland

Stephanie Loper

Nathan Fort

Holly Hudelson

Teresa Kenyon

Iara Montoro

CONGRATULATIONS!

 

 

Exam Tip - Legal Analysis

Your analysis is the most important thing that goes into a law school exam, so make sure it is in there!  Much of what students write when answering a law school exam is not legal analysis, and has originated in places other than the student’s mind.  The issues you will be dissecting were created by your professors and are contained within the examination fact patterns.  The same is true of the facts you will be discussing in your answer; they were created by your professor.  The law you will be relying on to resolve these issues originated in the cases and statutes you read during the course of the semester.  The only part of an essay answer unique to you is your commentary on WHY certain facts lead you to believe that a legal issue should be resolved in a particular way.  This commentary is legal analysis, and is the difference between the grades of “C” and “A” on a law school exam.

Spring 2010 Exam Numbers

On Tuesday, April 13, your exam number was mailed to your louisville.edu e-mail address.  If you did not receive your exam number, please contact Barbara Thompson in Student Records.

Please do not delete your exam number until you review your spring 2010 exams.

Reminder: Exam4 Practice Test Deadline Is Today

This is a reminder that the deadline for submitting an Exam4 practice test for Spring 2010 is Friday, April 16, 2010 at 6:00 PM EDT. Never, ever, ever use one's student ID number with Exam4 -- not for a practice test, and not for a real exam.  For practice tests, only use one's user name (e.g., ldbran01).  For real exams, use the exam number given to you each semester by Student Records.

The following was published in the Daily Docket last week, but is repeated below for your convenience:

Hardware and operating system requirements, and download and installation instructions, are posted at www.law.louisville.edu/it/exam-software-download.  Students are also urged to review the policy governing exams taken on computer.

Exam4 is available for Mac OS 10.4 (Tiger), 10.5 (Leopard) and 10.6 (Snow Leopard), and Windows XP and Vista and now Windows 7.

Any student who wishes to use his/her computer for final exams this semester must download and install the finals version of Exam4 AND properly take and submit a practice test by 6:00 PM EST, Friday, April 16, 2010. A properly taken and submitted practice test identifies the student by his/her UofL user name (e.g., ldbran01) -- not by one's student ID number, or any other combination of letters or numerals. To submit a practice test electronically, one must be on campus and connected to the University's wireless network. The University's firewall prevents off-campus submission.

Any student who wishes to use his/her computer for final exams this semester and cannot comply with the practice test requirement by the deadline must contact the Associate Dean for Student Life before the deadline if he/she wishes to petition for an extension of the practice test deadline or exemption from the practice test requirement.

VERY IMPORTANT: Any student who takes any exam on computer who: 1. has not properly taken and submitted a practice test, or 2. has not brought a working USB flash drive to any exam, will be refused technical assistance by the IT staff, including, but not limited to, submitting a completed exam.

After the practice test deadline has passed, the IT staff will send an e-mail confirmation to each student who has properly and timely submitted a practice test. In the meantime, you may check whether your practice test was received at www.law.louisville.edu/it/exam-tracker. Any practice test listed on the Exam Tracker is presumptively o.k.

 

Exam Tip - Use the Facts, But Do Not Just List the Facts

You cannot perform legal analysis without discussing the facts.  Remember, most law school essay questions are written in the form of a lengthy fact pattern or story.  The facts within these stories create the issues that you must discuss.  Almost every fact in these stories must be reproduced and discussed in your examination answer.  While it is true that your professors will know the facts in the problem, your professors do not know whether you understand which facts are relevant to resolving each issue. 

To ensure that the facts are making their way into your essay answers, place a line through each fact as you use it.  Do not cross the fact out so that it becomes illegible, however, because a single fact may be relevant to more than one issue.  After you finish your essay answer, look back at the fact pattern.  If there are facts left over, one of three things has occurred: (1) the facts are truly irrelevant and do not need to be discussed; (2) the facts are relevant to an issue or issues that you have already discussed; or (3) the facts are relevant to an issue that you have not addressed at all.

CautionListing facts is not the same thing as discussing them.  True legal analysis occurs when you explain to a reader why a fact (or facts) leads to a legal conclusion.  Consider the following examples. 

Example 1 - John told the plaintiff “I will hit you if you come around here again.”  Therefore, the battery was not imminent.

Example 2 – John told the plaintiff “I will hit you if you come around here again.” Generally, words alone cannot satisfy the imminence element of an assault.  More specifically, these words merely inform the listener that he might be “hit” at some point in the future.  The words “if you come around here again” placed a condition on the plaintiff being struck, which means that the plaintiff might never be struck by John.  The fact that John might never strike the plaintiff means that the battery cannot be imminent.

If you were not sure, example 2 is the better answer!  This is a somewhat obvious example to illustrate the point.  The pattern in the second example – note a fact (or facts) and then explain why you have brought it to the reader’s attention – consistently appears in well done legal analysis.

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT A REQUEST TO TAKE A MAKE-UP EXAM

If you are planning to take a make-up exam, please submit your request to take a make-up exam form to Student Records by Monday, April 19.

Reminder: Exam4 Practice Test Deadline Is Friday

This is a reminder that the deadline for submitting an Exam4 practice test for Spring 2010 is Friday, April 16, 2010 at 6:00 PM EDT.

The following practice tests, already submitted, are invalid as they are unidentifable:

00000
123
1234
4321
1251774
1325373
1353646
1579786
1596407
1662563
1662783

Never, ever, ever use one's student ID number with Exam4 -- not for a practice test, and not for a real exam.  For practice tests, only use one's user name (e.g., ldbran01).  For real exams, use the exam number given to you each semester by Student Records.


The following was published in the Daily Docket last week, but is repeated below for your convenience:

Hardware and operating system requirements, and download and installation instructions, are posted at www.law.louisville.edu/it/exam-software-download.  Students are also urged to review the policy governing exams taken on computer.

Exam4 is available for Mac OS 10.4 (Tiger), 10.5 (Leopard) and 10.6 (Snow Leopard), and Windows XP and Vista and now Windows 7.

Any student who wishes to use his/her computer for final exams this semester must download and install the finals version of Exam4 AND properly take and submit a practice test by 6:00 PM EST, Friday, April 16, 2010. A properly taken and submitted practice test identifies the student by his/her UofL user name (e.g., ldbran01) -- not by one's student ID number, or any other combination of letters or numerals. To submit a practice test electronically, one must be on campus and connected to the University's wireless network. The University's firewall prevents off-campus submission.

Any student who wishes to use his/her computer for final exams this semester and cannot comply with the practice test requirement by the deadline must contact the Associate Dean for Student Life before the deadline if he/she wishes to petition for an extension of the practice test deadline or exemption from the practice test requirement.

VERY IMPORTANT: Any student who takes any exam on computer who: 1. has not properly taken and submitted a practice test, or 2. has not brought a working USB flash drive to any exam, will be refused technical assistance by the IT staff, including, but not limited to, submitting a completed exam.

After the practice test deadline has passed, the IT staff will send an e-mail confirmation to each student who has properly and timely submitted a practice test. In the meantime, you may check whether your practice test was received at www.law.louisville.edu/it/exam-tracker. Any practice test listed on the Exam Tracker is presumptively o.k.

 

Josh Porter Wins the First-Year Oral Advocacy Competition

The Moot Court Board congratulates Josh Porter for winning the second annual First-Year Oral Advocacy Competition.  Mr. Porter defeated Jenn Seiwertsen in the finals. Special thanks go to Chief Judge Sara Combs, Judge Tom Wine, and Judge Fred Cowan for judging the finals.