What's an Orderly Bankruptcy? I Can't Find It in Black's Law Dictionary ...

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Today's announcement that $13.4 billion of the $700 billion TARP money will be used to help automakers who have been unable to access credit since the financial industry seized up in September comes directly after President Bush floated the idea of an "orderly bankrupcty" for the industry.  This term does not appear in any of the bankruptcy law books in our library, but I surmise what he and other non-lawyer pundits and biz-show talkers are talking about is a pre-packaged bankruptcy under Chapter 11.  I was wondering what actual bankrupcty lawyers thought of this magical kind of bankrupcty where the feds cushioned the blow and lost no money.  Well, lucky for me, NPR's Planet Money was able (unlike other news sources) to track down one of these elusive bankrupcty attorneys, Steve Jakubowski, of the Coleman Law Firm and author of the Bankruptcy Litigation Blog (http://www.bankruptcylitigationblog.com), and ask him how a "orderly" GM/Chrysler bankruptcy would work. Surprisely, its not all chirping bluebirds and fluffy bunnies; the other creditors get a vote, the U.S. might not be able to cut the payback line and a huge DIP (debt-in-possession for the uninitiated) loan will need to be funded by "somebody" (any guesses who?).  It's good stuff--that is, if you like facts with your Morning Joe (or Squawbox or Situation Room).