Law Students Attend Equal Justice Conference and Career Fair

On October 26th and 27th, the Equal Justice Conference and Career Fair in Washington, D.C. brought together over 1,200 law students with an interest in public service. This year, seven students represented the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law at the conference in hopes to gain a larger understanding and insight to providing public service in the legal field. The students participated in mock and actual interviews, networking, and workshops with a large array of employers and professionals who engage in public service. Among the conference speakers was Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor who provided an in-depth keynote session with Judge David Tatel of the U.S. District of Columbia Court of Appeals.

The goal of the Equal Justice Works Conference is to instill the notion that every American deserves the same quality of legal representation while helping to educate law students on how they can help ensure that this service is possible. Brandeis School of Law student Galen Joyce, who was a member of this year’s Equal Justice Conference, stated that “[equal justice] is a professional responsibility, and a moral one, to enable our fellow Americans by creating opportunities for equal access to justice.” Joyce attended the conference so that he could obtain the necessary knowledge to further his understanding of how to promote equal justice when he enters the legal field. According to the Brandeis School of Law’s conference attendee Emily Peeler, “equal representation [may provide] less of a gap in the judicial system between those who can and cannot afford top-notch attorneys.” Peeler’s experience at a non-profit law firm catalyzed her desire to advocate equal justice and her interest in attending the Equal Justice Conference.

The Equal Justice Conference allowed Brandeis School of Law students the opportunity to gain valuable exposure to nationally renowned legal representatives who strive for equal justice. Through this involvement, students left with a better understanding of how to pursue legal careers embodying public service and justice for all.

 

Article by Rachel Ainsworth, Communications Intern.