Academics News

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Using a Long Weekend to Your Advantage:  Catch up on your sleep this long weekend.  Remember to get no less than 7 hours of sleep per night every week.  If your body is sleep-deprived from the last two weeks because you have been sleeping less than 7 hours per night, now is the time to re-charge.  Then, make sure you get proper sleep hours for the remainder of the semester.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Using a Long Weekend to Your Advantage:  Create a structured study schedule and stick to it!   If you have been “flying by the seat of your pants” on your time management, now is the time to create a schedule and stick to it for the remainder of the semester.  If you follow a study schedule, you will be able to complete your reading and briefing one or two days before class (without rushing through the material), rather than the day of class.   You will also ensure that you are devoting enough time to other study tasks, including reviewing your class notes, outlining, meeting with your study group, working on papers and projects, and completing practice questions.  Perhaps the best part about following a study schedule is that you can have guilt-free time off because you have finished all of your study tasks for the week.  And, your family members, significant others, and friends will know when you will be free.  To create your own study schedule, use the blank time management schedule posted on the Academic Success webpage at http://www.law.louisville.edu/academics/academic-success.  If you need any assistance in completing your schedule, stop by the Academic Success Office (Room 212).

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Using a Long Weekend to Your Advantage:  Congratulations!  You are beginning your third week of classes.  For those of you who are new to law school, things should be getting into a routine now.  For those of you who are returning to law school, you probably feel like you never left because it is all so familiar.

You now have a long weekend that you can look forward to.  Use this time to improve your future workload as a law student.  Three days can be a blessing for law students who have gotten behind in their reading or who are feeling sleep-deprived.  This week's tips will provide suggestions for getting the most out of this weekend.  Tip 1:  If you are still getting settled in to your apartment, try to finish all of those tasks by the end of the weekend.  Finish unpacking boxes.  Finish organizing your study area.  Finish the final decorating touches.  Starting Tuesday morning you want to make law school your priority.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Should I rely on an upper-division student's outline or a commercial outline to prepare for exams?  NO.  Remember that you are not creating an outline to turn in as an assignment or to win any awards.  The outline is another tool from which you can study the law.  The process of you outlining a course dramatically increases your ability to retain the information and to develop a sense of what information you will need to apply to a set of facts on an exam.  In addition, commercial outlines are not always in tune with the material as presented by your professor.  Canned outlines may be helpful to fill in any gaps after you have done the work, but they SHOULD NOT take the place of your own outlines.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Study Groups are Not for Studying:  Study groups are one of the most misunderstood aspects of law school life.  In fact, the term "study group" is something of a misnomer - "review group" may be more appropriate.  Review groups are most effective when all the group members have studied on their own and then come together to test each other's knowledge.  Before you decide whether or not to join a review group, you need to consider the advantages and disadvantages.  The Academic Success Workshop this afternoon at 1:00 p.m. in Room 275 will address these issues and more.  I hope to see you there. 

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

It Takes Time To Acquire New Skills in Law School:  Even if you learn perfectly every bit of information presented to you in your texts and classes, you still may fail to do well in law school.  Although knowledge is crucial to success, the goal of legal education is to teach you skills.  In other words, what you need to learn is how to apply the knowledge you acquire and how to effectively do so in writing.  This point is often overlooked by new law students.  Your law school exams will require you to demonstrate your skills in applying your knowledge of the law to new situations.  Acquiring new skills requires you to practice those skills over and over and requires a large expenditure of time by you (and does not necessarily come easily or quickly).  Keep your focus this semester and allow the time necessary to develop these important skills. 

Adapted from Expert Learning for Law Students by Michael Hunter Schwartz.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Don't Do Your Reading Too Far in Advance:  The more you remember from your reading assignment, the more you will get out of class.  If you do your reading too long before a class meets, you will remember so little of the material that you will lose the benefits of working ahead.  As a general rule, try to complete your reading one to two days before class.  This, together with a five-minute pre-class review, will maximize your classroom learning.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Tips to Becoming More Efficient and Effective:  Time is a precious commodity in law school.  Law students are always looking for shortcuts; however, shortcuts are not the answer.  Instead, you want to use time more efficiently and effectively.  Here are some suggestions:

1. Learn the material as you read it rather than highlight it to learn later.  Ask questions while you read.  Make margin notes as you read.  Brief the case or make additional notes to emphasize the main points and big picture of the topic after you finish reading.  If you only do cursory "survival" reading, you will have to re-read for learning later which means double work.
2. Review what you have read before class.   By reviewing, you reinforce your learning.  You will be able to follow in class better.  You will recognize what is important for note taking rather than taking down everything the professor says.  You will be able to respond to questions more easily.  Your confidence level about the material will increase.
3. Be more efficient and effective in taking class notes.  Listen carefully in class.  Take down the main points rather than frantically writing or typing verbatim notes.  Use consistent symbols and abbreviations in your notes.  
4. Review your class notes within 24 hours.  Fill in gaps.  Organize the notes if needed.  Note any questions that you have.  If you wait to review your notes until you are outlining, you will have less recall of the material.
5. Regularly review material.   We forget 80% of what we learn in 2 weeks if we do not review.  Regular review of your outlines will mean less cramming at the end of the semester.  You save time ultimately by not re-learning.   You gain deeper understanding.  You have less stress at exam time.
6. Look for the big picture at the end of each sub-topic and topic.  Do not wait until pre-exam studying to pull the course together.  Synthesize the cases that you have read on a sub-topic: how are they different and similar.  Determine the main points that you need to cull from cases for the sub-topic or topic.  Analyze how the sub-topics or topics are inter-related.  If visuals help you learn, incorporate a flowchart or table or other graphic into your outline to show the steps of analysis and/or inter-relationships. 
7. Ask the professors questions as soon as you can.  Do not store up questions like a squirrel storing nuts for winter.  The sooner you get your questions answered, the greater your comprehension of current material.  New topics often build on understanding of prior topics.  Unanswered questions merely lead to more confusion and less learning.


 

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Get to Know Your Professors:  The faculty members at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law are top notch legal scholars and teachers, and they also provide valuable insight into how you can be successful.  Be sure to meet with each of your professors at least once during the semester.  Utilize their office hours to clarify points of the law or to follow up on a class discussion.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP

Taking Effective Notes in Class:  Avoid simply rewriting information about the cases that is already contained in your case briefs.  Instead, simply correct or add to your briefs so that they accurately reflect what your professor and classmates are saying about the case.  If you use this technique, you will likely be more engaged in the professor's lecture.  For more tips, attend the Workshop this afternoon at 1:00 p.m. in Room 275.