Faculty News

Professor Abrams and Student Greg Justis Present at 2013 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference

Professor Jamie Abrams and Student Gregory Justis both presented papers last weekend at the 2013 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference. Professor Abrams' paper, "Enforcing Masculinities at the Border," explored how our immigration laws reinforce dominant masculinities at the border by excluding marginalized masculinities and admitting those who comport with dominant masculinity norms, enforcing masculinity norms at its borders. Greg's paper, "Defining “Union”: The Defense of Marriage Act, Tribal Sovereignty and Same-Sex Marriage," explored the potential impact of DOMA and related legislation on a recent trend towards tribal recognition of same-sex unions throughout the United States, as well as the likely impact of legal recognition on state, federal and tribal law. Congratulations to both of you!!

Welcome Justice John Paul Stevens!

Louis D. Brandeis School of Law proudly announces our 2013 Brandeis Medal recipient, Justice John Paul Stevens. The medal will be presented at a dinner on April 18, 2013.

The life work of Justice Stevens is very much in keeping with the values of Justice Brandeis. His service on the Court and his commitment to civility and a balanced approach to issues are values and qualities that Justice Brandeis would have applauded. He shares with Justice Brandeis an interest in antitrust law, free speech, search and seizure, and the role of state governments. His commitment to public service has been honored at many law schools through Justice John Paul Stevens Public Interest Fellowships.
 
Justice Stevens traces his seat on the Court directly to Justice Brandeis. When Justice Brandeis left the Court, he was replaced by Justice William O. Douglas, and when Justice Douglas retired, Justice Stevens was appointed to that position. Justice Elena Kagan was appointed to replace Justice Stevens. In his 2011 book, Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir, Justice Stevens describes the history of the Court by reflecting on the five Chief Justices of the Supreme Court with whom he served during his service from 1975 to 2010.
 
The Brandeis Medal is awarded to individuals whose lives reflect Justice Brandeis’ commitment to the ideals of public service. Previous recipients include Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Harry A. Blackmun, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen G. Breyer; Judges A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. and Abner J. Mikva; New York District Attorney Robert Morgenthau; Professors Archibald Cox, Jr.; Professors Samuel Dash and Charles J. Ogletree; civil rights attorney Morris Dees, Jr.; Senator Howard H. Baker; Congressman John Lewis; Brandeis biographer Melvin Urofsky, and legal journalist Linda Greenhouse.


The 2013 Brandeis Medal Presentation and Dinner is made possible through funds provided by the Wilson W. and Anne D. Wyatt Distinguished Speakers Endowment. 

 

Justice John Paul Stevens at the Law School on Thursday

Louis D. Brandeis School of Law proudly announces that Justice John Paul Stevens will receive the prestigious Brandeis Medal at a dinner on April 18, 2013.  Justice Stevens served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1975 until his retirement in 2010.

The law school will host a question and answer session with Justice Stevens in the Allen Courtroom at 1:30 p.m. on April 18. Attendance is free and open to all UofL students. Attendees are asked to please arrive before 1 p.m. and dress appropriately (business-casual attire.)

For more details about the Brandeis Medal Presentation and Dinner, or to make reservations, please visit the Brandeis School of Law Web site.

Justice Stevens and Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's, Jr. Letter From Birmingham City Jail. The Los Angeles Times recently wrote about this anniversary and commented:


King's discourse on legal equality rejected the argument that laws favoring the majority were no different than laws protecting a minority. Or, as Justice John Paul Stevens has written, equality does not require us to ignore "the difference between a 'no trespassing' sign and a welcome mat."


During the spring of 1967 Martin Luther King, Jr. visited the law school. This week we will welcome Justice Stevens to the law school to receive the Brandeis Medal. I hope you will join us in room 275 on Thursday for a Q & A with Justice Stevens. Please arrive before 1 p.m. and dress appropriately (business-casual attire).


I also hope all of you will read Martin Luther King's, Jr. letter. The text can be found at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/archive/document/letter-birmingham-city-jai.... We can all still learn from his powerful words and example.

Dean Duncan

Bench & Bar

The March 2013 issue of the Kentucky Bar Association's Bench & Bar is now available online in both PDF and Flip Book format.

In her report, Interim Dean Susan Duncan, showcases the law school's Criminal Law curriculum and Professors Abramson, Weaver, and Milligan, to coincide with the issue's commemoration of the Golden Anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright, "the U.S. Supreme Court case extending to state court criminal defendants the right to legal counsel under the Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments."

This issue also includes an article by Professor Luke M. Milligan entitled, "Hugo's Trumpet," a nod to Anthony Lewis's book, Gideon's Trumpet, about the constitutional right to counsel.

Law School Appreciation Week Kick-Off

Join law school students, faculty, staff and alumni out in front of the law school building on the portico for the kick-off to Law School Appreciation Week.

Sign our huge thank you banner to show those who have supported you that you appreciate their contributions.

 

Monday, April 8, from 11:30-2:30

Free Popcorn

The Beginning of the World (Wide Web) As We Know It

Mosaic 1.0, the graphical browser that popularized the World Wide Web in the 1990s, was released 20 years ago this month. While not the first Web browser, Mosaic's importance was its inclusion of images and availability for Windows computers. Previously, Web browsers had been limited to text and the Unix operating system.

An interesting historical footnote: The first Windows Web browser, Cello, was developed by Thomas R. Bruce, co-founder and director of Cornell Law School's Legal Information Institute. Tom Bruce is a giant in the very small world of legal education technology.

Business First: Book of Lists

Ever wonder what the current top Louisville law firms are? Or whether they are employing more lawyers than last year? The quickest way to answer those questions is to consult Business First of Louisville’s Book of Lists, an annual compilation of the weekly industry rankings in Louisville’s premier source of business news, and a resource currently available from the University of Louisville Libraries.

Go to UoL's Databases List. Next, choose “B” then Business First Louisville.  That will take you to the forty-odd local business newspapers in the BizLink database.  Louisville’s Business First is located in the highlighted box at the top of the page. Links there allow you to search for articles, view whole recent issues, or look at the most recent Book of Lists.  If you follow that last link, it will take you to the 2012 edition of the BOL. The Top Law Firms table (first released on Dec 28, 2012) is found on page 18 of the printed version, or by entering 24 into the search box online.

For more tips like these, visit the Law Library News for Faculty Archives.

UofL Law Professor Jamie Abrams Weighs in on Proposition 8

Brandeis School of Law Assistant Professor Jamie Abrams joined 37 professors of family law and constitutional law in an amicus brief filed in the United States Supreme Court in Hollingsworth v. Perry. Professor Abrams is one of many Brandeis faculty members influencing legal matters of national importance.


Commonly known as the "Prop 8" case, Oral Arguments are being heard Tuesday, March 26.

Read the brief to which Professor Abrams contributed, or follow the activity on this high profile, nationally significant case at SCOTUSblog.

University of Louisville Law Review Selected to Host National Conference of Law Reviews in 2015

The University of Louisville Law Review is pleased to announce that it has been selected to host the 61st Annual National Conference of Law Reviews in March 2015. The conference allows law journal editors from throughout the nation to gather to exchange ideas and experiences about issues common to student-edited publications. Conference attendees also have the opportunity to hear from the foremost members of the legal community, meet with publishing and other service vendors, and socialize with a diverse group of law review editors from across the United States. Between 250 and 350 student editors attend the conference each year.

This announcement follows a successful week for the Law Review at this year's conference at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, where it was recognized for best practices and innovation in editing. The Law Review presented to an audience of approximately 80 representatives of journals from throughout the nation about steps taken this year to improve the efficiency of the editing process. Following the presentation, at least 25 journals expressed direct interest in at least partially modeling their editing procedures and organizational structure after the University of Louisville Law Review. The presentation will be published in this year's NCLR Best Practices Manual, which will be distributed to hundreds of law journals throughout the country.

This is a big win for the Law Review, the law school and the Louisville community. The Law Review is honored to be selected to host the conference and looks forward to welcoming editors from throughout the nation to Louisville in March 2015.