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Shaping the Tributary, Building the Pipeline: The Central High School Partnership

The next program in our Diversity Forum Series, "Shaping the Tributary, Building the Pipeline: The Central High School Partnership", will be presented at 11:45 AM on Tuesday, March 9 in room 275.  

PART I -- Overview

  • Professor Laura Rothstein
  • Professor Cedric Merlin Powell
  • Noelle Rao, 3L, Marshall-Brennan teacher
  • Christien Russell, Central High School senior
  • Osiah Graham, UofL Freshman and Harlan Scholar


Part II -- What are the Commitments and How do I sign Up?

  • Kathy Urbach, Assistant Dean for Public Service (Street Law)
  • Mary Jo Gleason, Coordinator of Junior Writing Skills program
  • Professor Sam Marcosson, Marshall-Brennan Coordinator


A free light lunch from Expressions of You available at 11:15 AM outside Room 275.

Trademark Moot Court Team Wins Regional Competition

Congratulations to the Saul Lefkowitz Trademark Moot Court Competition team for winning the South region on Saturday!  The team consists of Mari-Elise Gates, Marilyn Osborn, and Justin Capps and is coached by Adjunct Professor Jack Wheat.  A team consisting of Jessica Richards and Marty Pohl also faired very well.

The region included teams from Duke, Emory, Alabama, Houston, and Vanderbilt among others.  The win was Louisville Law's first ever trademark regional championship.  The team swept all the awards at the competition, taking best brief and best oral advocacy team.

The team now advances to the national finals in Washington, D.C., on March 20.  Arguments will take place at the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Kudos to the Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot Court Team

The University of Louisville was well represented in the pre-Moot International Commercial Arbitration competition at Loyola University on Saturday, February 27 with Elisabeth Luff receiving Runner Up for best oral argument. The team is composed of Elisabeth Luff and James Fischer, who received Runner Up for Top Team. The other team composed of Andrea Fagan and Chris Smith also received great scores, but were just out of medal competition. Two students will be selected to compete next month in Vienna. The team is coached by adjunct professor, Robert Brown.

 

Louisville's Top Lawyers

Louisville Magazine's March 2010 edition features its annual "Top Lawyers" special. Several of our graduates are mentioned including profiles of Diana L. Skaggs, '82, Robyn Smith, '08, Phillip A. Martin, '01, and Ron Russell, '89.

Another article by Dan Crutcher, "Louisville Connectors" (page 52) also features some of our graduates. Carol Butler, '77, appears on the Government Sector list; Robert Brown, '74, and Laura Douglas, '74, appear on the Corporate Sector list; Tori McClure, '95, appears on the Academic Sector list; and Tom FitzGerald, an adjunct professor, appears on the Nonprofit/Civic Sector list. Holly Houston, '94, is also one of Leadership Louisville's Connector.

The magazine's cover features a photograph of Justice Louis D. Brandeis. Inside, there's an article by James Nold Jr. titled "Justice for All" (page 58), which includes a summary of Brandeis's contributions to the courts and society, as well as comments about the recent Brandeis biography by Melvin Urofsky.

"He will certainly go down as Louisville's most cerebral gift to the world, but Louis D. Brandeis --- civil-liberties lawyer, author and U.S. Supreme Court justice --- will also be remembered as a progressive pioneer and conscience of corporate America." ~James Nold Jr. 

 


Saturday Academy

On February 27, Lisa Nicholson, Cedric Powell, and Enid Trucios-Haynes presented "Teachers of the Law" at the Saturday Academy, presented by the College of Arts and Sciences.

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Are You Being Efficient?

Time is a precious commodity in law school.  Law students are always looking for shortcuts; however, shortcuts are not the answer.  Instead, you want to use your time more efficiently and effectively.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Learn the material as you read it rather than highlight it to learn later.  Ask questions while you read.  Make margin notes as you read.  Brief the case or make additional notes to emphasize the main points and big picture of the topic after you finish reading.  If you only do cursory "survival" reading, you will have to re-read for learning later which means double work.
  • Review what you have read before class.   By reviewing, you reinforce your learning.  You will be able to follow in class better.  You will recognize what is important for note taking rather than taking down everything the professor says.  You will be able to respond to questions more easily.  Your confidence level about the material will increase.
  • Be more efficient and effective in taking class notes.  Listen carefully in class.  Take down the main points rather than frantically writing or typing verbatim notes.  Use consistent symbols and abbreviations in your notes.  
  • Review your class notes within 24 hours.  Fill in gaps.  Organize the notes if needed.  Note any questions that you have.  If you wait to review your notes until you are outlining, you will have less recall of the material.
  • Regularly review material.   We forget 80% of what we learn in 2 weeks if we do not review.  Regular review of your outlines will mean less cramming at the end of the semester.  You save time ultimately by not re-learning.   You gain deeper understanding.  You have less stress at exam time.
  • Look for the big picture at the end of each sub-topic and topic.  Do not wait until pre-exam studying to pull the course together.  Synthesize the cases that you have read on a sub-topic: how are they different and similar.  Determine the main points that you need to cull from cases for the sub-topic or topic.  Analyze how the sub-topics or topics are inter-related.  If visuals help you learn, incorporate a flowchart or table or other graphic into your outline to show the steps of analysis and/or inter-relationships. 
  • Ask the professors questions as soon as you can.  Do not store up questions like a squirrel storing nuts for winter.  The sooner you get your questions answered, the greater your comprehension of current material.  New topics often build on understanding of prior topics.  Unanswered questions merely lead to more confusion and less learning.

NLR 2010 Law Student Writing Competition

Rules and Submission Guidelines

The National Law Review (NLR) consolidates practice-oriented legal analysis from a variety of sources for easy access by lawyers, paralegals, law students, business executives, insurance professionals, accountants, compliance officers, human resource managers, and other professionals who wish to better understand specific legal issues relevant to their work.

The NLR Law Student Writing Competition offers law students the opportunity to submit articles for publication consideration on the NLR Web site.  No entry fee is required. Applicants can submit an unlimited number of entries each month.

  • Winning submissions will initially be published online in April, May, and June 2010.
  • In each of these months, entries will be judged and the top two articles chosen will be featured in the NLR monthly magazine prominently displayed on the NLR home page. Up to 25 runner-up entries will also be posted in the NLR searchable database each month.
  • Each winning article will be displayed accompanied by the student’s photo, biography, contact information, law school logo, and any copyright disclosure.
  • All winning articles will remain in the NLR database for two years (subject to earlier removal upon request of the law school).
  • In addition, the NLR sends links to targeted articles to specific professional groups via e-mail. The NLR also posts links to selected articles on the “Legal Issues” or “Research” sections of various professional organizations’ Web sites. (NLR, at its sole discretion, may distribute any winning entry in such a manner, but does not make any such guarantees nor does NLR represent that this is part of the prize package.)

The first submission deadline is March 25, 2010.



In Memoriam: Dr. Karen Holt

Dr. Karen Holt, '83, died October 27, 2009. A native of Paducah, KY, Karen spent the majority of her career fulfilling her passion for public service, civil rights and education. Dr. Holt was an assistant vice president of the Institute for Public Service at the University of Tennessee. Prior to that, Dr. Holt had served as an associate general counsel at UT (1985-1995), led the University of Virginia’s Office of Equal Opportunity Programs (1997-2003), was an attorney with the Civil and Civil Rights Divisions of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, DC (1983-1985), served as executive director of Project Pericles in New York (2003-2005) and was director of the Fanning Institute at the University of Georgia (2006-2008).

NAELA Elder Law Writing Competition

The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) is sponsoring the Fifth Annual NAELA Elder Law Writing Competition - a writing competition designed to focus students on the legal issues affecting seniors or people with disabilities.  

NAELA offers a $1,500 cash prize for the best article, and the winning author will be interviewed for a future issue of NAELA News, a publication that reaches all of NAELA's 4,000+ members. The cash prizes for second and third places are $1,000 and $500, respectively. The top eight authors will be published in the NAELA Student Journal in early winter 2011 and will receive a complimentary one-year membership in NAELA.

May 31 is the deadline. This opportunity is open to all part- and full-time JD candidates who have not yet graduated. See the attached announcement flyer and official entry form for details.

 

THE LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW FROM A CLASS

The last day to withdraw from a class is Friday, February 26.

The system is normally available Sundays through Thursdays, from 2:00 a.m. to midnight; Fridays from 2:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Due to this expansion of hours, there may be some times the system will be down that is unplanned.  This normally occurs on Saturdays and Sundays.

If you try to withdraw from a class and unable to complete the process, please contact Barbara Thompson in Student Records before 4:30 p.m., Friday, February 26.