Student News

Join the ABA Law Student Division 2011-2012 Leadership Team

Visit www.abanet.org/lsd/elections/ for the eligibility requirements, nomination/application forms, and delivery instructions.

The ABA Law Student Division has numerous leadership positions available either by election or appointment. As a national leader of the Division, you will work with law student leaders across the country, including ABA student leaders, SBA Presidents, and leaders of other national law student organizations, as well as lawyers and judges. Leadership will provide you with the opportunity to travel and participate in various roundtables, debates and discussions addressing issues and concerns of law students. Past leaders have stated that the professional, educational, and personal rewards they gained from their experience as an ABA Law Student Division leader were invaluable.

Research Project involving Governmental Immunity

Law student needed for research project involving governmental immunity.  Must be a 2L or 3L student.  For details, go to:  http://www.law.louisville.edu/careers/current-jobs and select Part-time Job No. 10.

Summer 2011 Opportunity in Chicago

Any student seriously interested in working in Chicago this summer should send a resume via email to Dean Urbach by Tuesday, January 18 at noon.  Kathy.Urbach@louisville.edu

Kentucky Bar Program - Recording Available

If you missed the Kentucky Bar Program on Tuesday, the recording is available at
http://media.law.louisville.edu/B0DCEC05-CA83-4571-8191-EB2D2CD99958/.  This link will be active for two weeks.  Students taking the bar exam in July 2011, or February 2012, should view the program.  Questions?  Please contact Kimberly Ballard, at kimberly.ballard@louisville.edu.

Hate Crime Laws: Unnecessary and Undesirable or Essential and Indispensable?

TODAY: Lunch Provided

Room 275, 12:00-1:00 

Beginning in the mid-1980s, Americans were told that "hate crime" was on the rise throughout the nation. Numerous advocacy groups lobbied for—and achieved—the passage of laws specifically engineered to document the rise in hate crime and dole out extra punishment for perpetrators who chose their victims on the basis of race, ethnic group, religion, or sexual orientation. But were these legislative efforts necessary or even helpful?

Professor James Jacobs of New York University (NYU) School of Law and our own Professor Cedric Powell will engage in a scholarly debate on the topic.

National Trial Volunteer Witness Information

If you were unable to attend the information session on Wednesday, but are still interested in volunteering for the National Trial Competition as a witness, forms are available outside the Moot Court Board Office (across from the Washer Lounge). 

Students planning to volunteer must see Jina Scinta in Office 180 before February 15, to complete any necessary paperwork in order to receive public service credit.

Questions?  Please email Brian Bennett.  bmbenn02@louisville.edu

Kudos for JLE Member

Congratulations to Connie Barr Archer whose note was chosen for publication in the JLE's January 2011 issue. While the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act has enacted measures for the United States to once again become the leader in higher education attainment rates, one problem with meeting this goal is the scarcity of qualified professors to teach at the university level. With the scarcity due in part to low doctoral enrollments coupled with low and slow doctoral completion rates, Connie’s note discusses steps that legislatures should take to support the doctoral enrollment and completion process without compromising educational standards. Her note is entitled "Addressing the Doctoral Dilemma: How State Legislatures Can Help Solve the Ph.D. Shortage."

Info Session on Volunteering for National Trial Competition

Join Brian Bennett today (noon in Room 275) to learn how you can volunteer for the National Trial Competition (Feb 18 - 20) and earn public service hours that will satisfy the Law School's public service requirement.  This opportunity is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, 3Ls, and 4Ls.

Hate Crime Laws: Unnecessary and Undesirable or Essential and Indispensable?

Thursday, Jan. 13, Room 175, 12:00-1:00.

Lunch Provided 

Beginning in the mid-1980s, Americans were told that "hate crime" was on the rise throughout the nation. Numerous advocacy groups lobbied for—and achieved—the passage of laws specifically engineered to document the rise in hate crime and dole out extra punishment for perpetrators who chose their victims on the basis of race, ethnic group, religion, or sexual orientation. But were these legislative efforts necessary or even helpful?

Professor James Jacobs of New York University (NYU) School of Law and our own Professor Cedric Powell will engage in a scholarly debate on the topic.

Last Day to Add

January 11 is the last day to add a class, or change a class to an audit.  January 11 is the last day to receive 100% tuition refund.