Constitution Day Commemoration


Barry Faulkner, The Constitution
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

United States Constitution, preamble



[W]e must never forget that it is a constitution we are expounding.

McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 316, 407 (1819)



Constitution

The United States Constitution is not only the basic law of the United States. It has also inspired politicians, philosophers, and ordinary people around the world. Scholars have devoted intense attention to the Constitution, its interpretation by the Supreme Court of the United States, and its impact on the American people.

Constitutional law forms an important part of the Law School's curriculum and research agenda. University of Louisville faculty members have devoted considerable attention to the Constitution, its interpretation, and its social meaning. Lawyers with diverse practices and specializations share a background in constitutional law, which in turn unites the practicing bar in a common civil culture based on the Constitution and its role in American history and politics.

The Law School therefore takes great pride in presenting an annual commemoration of Constitution Day on behalf of the entire University of Louisville. This year's program consists of a collection of videos that provide commentary on recent developments in the Supreme Court of the United States and in lower federal courts. Jim Chen, Samuel Marcosson, Luke Milligan, Laura Rothstein and Joseph Tomain review a significant year of developments in American constitutional law.

2010 Constitution Day Program

  • Luke M. Milligan, Introduction
  • Jim Chen, McDonald v. City of Chicago: The States and the 2nd Amendment
  • Samuel A. Marcosson, The California Same-Sex Marriage Case
  • Luke M. Milligan, City of Ontario v. Quon
  • Laura Rothstein, Christian Legal Society v. Martinez
  • Joseph A. Tomain, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

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Legal notice: This page is composed in compliance with section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2004, Pub. L. No. 108-447, ยง 111, 118 Stat. 2809, 3344-45 (2004), more colloquially known as the "Constitution Day" statute. See also Notice of Implementation of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on September 17 of Each Year, 70 Fed. Reg. 29,727 (May 24, 2005).

Section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act states in relevant part: "Each educational institution that receives Federal funds for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on September 17 of such year for the students served by the educational institution." Section 111 further requires that Constitution Day be commemorated on September 17, in honor of the day in 1787 on which the Constitution was signed. In a year in which September 17 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, Constitution Day may be commemorated during the preceding or following week.