UofL Law News and Events

Employee Spotlight: Bailey Schrupp

Student News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:36
p align=centerimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/profile-baileyschrupp.jpg / /ppnbsp;/pp align=centeriCongratulations to Bailey who graduates this Saturday, May 9th! Kudos also to two other law library student workers graduating this weekend: Michael VanSickle and Alex Russell! We wish you each the best in all your endeavours./i/ppNext up is rising quot;Fightin' 3Lquot; bBailey Schrupp/b. She's the President of the Environmental Law amp; Land Use Society and Notes Editor of the a href=/students/jaeliJournal of Animal and Environmental Law/i/a . In addition to working in the law library, Bailey's got a busy summer ahead serving as the Donan Energy Law Fellow and volunteering as a Coordinator for the Jefferson County Teen Court Program.  /ppbWhat’s your hometown? /b/ppiRadcliff, Kentucky/i/ppbWhere did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?/b/ppiCampbellsville University, Political Science major and History minor  /i/ppbWhat led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?/b/ppiI either want to go on to get my masters of Library Science and become a law librarian or I want to get my LLM in Environmental Law and then work for the State or Federal Goverment doing environmental work. /i/ppbWhat do you enjoy about working in the law library? /b/ppiThe books! I am history nerd so any time I get to shelve older treatises downstairs I end up reading them. /i/ppbWhat’s your favorite book?/b/ppiIt would be impossible to pick one, but my favorites are The Harry Potter series, The Great Gatsby, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Angels amp; Demons by Dan Brown. I also liked , quot;I am Malalaquot; by Malala Yousafzai./i  /ppbDo you have a favorite quote?/b/ppiquot;Why, sometimes I've believed six impossible things before breakfastquot;. ~Alice in Wonderland /i/ppbIf you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?/b/ppiIf we are talking historical figures I would say JFK or Jackie Kennedy. If not then it would have to be Reese Witherspoon or Emma Watson.  /i/ppbDo you have any pets? /b/ppiI have a toy poodle named Choco and two cats, Kelsey and Leonardo Da Vinci (we call him Leo though)./ibr / /ppnbsp;/ppnbsp;/pp b/b/p

Employee Spotlight: Bailey Schrupp

Latest News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:36
p align=centerimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/profile-baileyschrupp.jpg / /ppnbsp;/pp align=centeriCongratulations to Bailey who graduates this Saturday, May 9th! Kudos also to two other law library student workers graduating this weekend: Michael VanSickle and Alex Russell! We wish you each the best in all your endeavours./i/ppNext up is rising quot;Fightin' 3Lquot; bBailey Schrupp/b. She's the President of the Environmental Law amp; Land Use Society and Notes Editor of the a href=/students/jaeliJournal of Animal and Environmental Law/i/a . In addition to working in the law library, Bailey's got a busy summer ahead serving as the Donan Energy Law Fellow and volunteering as a Coordinator for the Jefferson County Teen Court Program.  /ppbWhat’s your hometown? /b/ppiRadcliff, Kentucky/i/ppbWhere did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?/b/ppiCampbellsville University, Political Science major and History minor  /i/ppbWhat led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?/b/ppiI either want to go on to get my masters of Library Science and become a law librarian or I want to get my LLM in Environmental Law and then work for the State or Federal Goverment doing environmental work. /i/ppbWhat do you enjoy about working in the law library? /b/ppiThe books! I am history nerd so any time I get to shelve older treatises downstairs I end up reading them. /i/ppbWhat’s your favorite book?/b/ppiIt would be impossible to pick one, but my favorites are The Harry Potter series, The Great Gatsby, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Angels amp; Demons by Dan Brown. I also liked , quot;I am Malalaquot; by Malala Yousafzai./i  /ppbDo you have a favorite quote?/b/ppiquot;Why, sometimes I've believed six impossible things before breakfastquot;. ~Alice in Wonderland /i/ppbIf you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?/b/ppiIf we are talking historical figures I would say JFK or Jackie Kennedy. If not then it would have to be Reese Witherspoon or Emma Watson.  /i/ppbDo you have any pets? /b/ppiI have a toy poodle named Choco and two cats, Kelsey and Leonardo Da Vinci (we call him Leo though)./ibr / /ppnbsp;/ppnbsp;/pp b/b/p

How to Connect from Home

Faculty News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:35
pSome of the library's a href=/library/e-journalselectronic journals and databases/a are restricted to campus use only. However, many of the law school's digital collections and the a href=http://louisville.edu/library/University of Louisville Libraries' resources/a may be accessed remotely from your home computer or mobile device. /ppVisit the a href=/librarylibrary's website/a and click a href=https://login.echo.louisville.edu/loginquot;Connect from Homequot;/a. On the next page, enter your ULink ID and password. Contact a librarian if you’d like assistance. /pp align=centera href=/libraryimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/connectfromhome.jpg //a /ppFor more tips like these, visit the a href=/library/facultynewsLaw Library News for Faculty Archives/a.  /p

How to Connect from Home

Latest News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 14:35
pSome of the library's a href=/library/e-journalselectronic journals and databases/a are restricted to campus use only. However, many of the law school's digital collections and the a href=http://louisville.edu/library/University of Louisville Libraries' resources/a may be accessed remotely from your home computer or mobile device. /ppVisit the a href=/librarylibrary's website/a and click a href=https://login.echo.louisville.edu/loginquot;Connect from Homequot;/a. On the next page, enter your ULink ID and password. Contact a librarian if you’d like assistance. /pp align=centera href=/libraryimg src=/sites/www.law.louisville.edu/files/connectfromhome.jpg //a /ppFor more tips like these, visit the a href=/library/facultynewsLaw Library News for Faculty Archives/a.  /p

Fall 2015 On Campus Interviews

Student News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 09:32
span style=font-family: 'Verdana','sans-serif'; font-size: 9ptPlease be aware that Fall 2015 Recruiting begins on Monday, August 10th which is the week before the fall semester begins. Students who are working over the summer and want to participate must make plans to be available to interview if they are selected. It is important to keep your resume current and update it. Almost all employers will be interviewing to fill summer associates/law clerks positions for the following summer (summer 2016). Some employers will be interviewing 3Ls for post-graduation positions and some may be looking for students to work during the school year. This hiring timely may seem very early but larger law firms and companies begin their hiring process almost a year in advance./span

Journal of Law and Education Application Period Open

Student News - Fri, 05/01/2015 - 09:22
p style=margin-bottom: 6px; color: #141823; font-family: helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19pxThe Journal of Law and Education is now accepting applications for membership. /pp style=margin-top: 6px; margin-bottom: 6px; color: #141823; font-family: helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19pxThe JLE provides an important resource for judges, lawyers, teachers, school administrators, and education practitioners to stay abreast of developments in education law (i.e., constitutional issues, torts, disability law, employment law). Professionals across the country and around the world depend on the JLE for information./pp style=margin-top: 6px; margin-bottom: 6px; color: #141823; font-family: helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19pxAs a Candidate, you have the opportunity to earn 1-2 credit hours for yspan style=display: inline class=x_text_exposed_showour work. You will be asked to complete four rounds of case or article abstracts, throughout the year, and write a Chalk Talk on a topic of your choosing. You may also choose to fulfill the law school’s writing requirement with your Chalk Talk. /span/pdiv style=display: inline; color: #141823; font-family: helvetica, arial, 'lucida grande', sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 19px class=x_text_exposed_showp style=margin-bottom: 6pxPlease fill out the attached application, provide a writing sample and your resume.The Journal of Law and Education is now accepting applications for membership. /pp style=margin-top: 6px; margin-bottom: 6pxThe JLE provides an important resource for judges, lawyers, teachers, school administrators, and education practitioners to stay abreast of developments in education law (i.e., constitutional issues, torts, disability law, employment law). Professionals across the country and around the world depend on the JLE for information./pp style=margin-top: 6px; margin-bottom: 6pxAs a Candidate, you have the opportunity to earn 1-2 credit hours for yspan style=display: inline class=x_text_exposed_showour work. You will be asked to complete four rounds of case or article abstracts, throughout the year, and write a Chalk Talk on a topic of your choosing. You may also choose to fulfill the law school’s writing requirement with your Chalk Talk. /span/pp style=margin-bottom: 6pxPlease fill out the attached application, provide a writing sample and your resume. Applications are due May 15th, so you will have plenty of time after finals. If you have any questions, please contact Annale Renneker at annale.renneker@louisville.edu. /pp style=margin-bottom: 6pxbNOTE: After talking with the editors of the other law journals, we have agreed to send out offers on the same day. Instead of May 19, as the application states, offers will be sent on May 24th. /b/p/div

Reduced Library Hours During the Break

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:58
div class=content div class=content pThe law library will close at 5PM on Friday, May 1. It will also be closed May 2-3 (Derby Weekend) and May 9-10 (Graduation Weekend). It will be open from 8AM-5PM Monday thru Friday, May 4-8. The law library will begin its Summer schedule on Monday, May 11.   /pbr /pPlease refer to thea href=/library/about/hours target=_blank Law Library Hours/a and a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.html target=_blankEkstrom Library Hours/a for more information.a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.htmlbr //a/p /div /div

Reduced Library Hours During the Break

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:58
div class=content div class=content pThe law library will close at 5PM on Friday, May 1. It will also be closed May 2-3 (Derby Weekend) and May 9-10 (Graduation Weekend). It will be open from 8AM-5PM Monday thru Friday, May 4-8. The law library will begin its Summer schedule on Monday, May 11.   /pbr /pPlease refer to thea href=/library/about/hours target=_blank Law Library Hours/a and a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.html target=_blankEkstrom Library Hours/a for more information.a href=http://louisville.edu/library/ekstrom/hours.htmlbr //a/p /div /div

Louisville Law Review receives its highest national ranking ever

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:09
pWashington and Lee School of Law released its law review rankings for 2014, which included a 6-percent jump in the rankings for the University of Louisville Law Review. Among ranked U.S. journals, the Louisville Law Review now ranks in the top 18 percent nationwide, up from the top 24 percent just one year ago.br / br /With these scores, the Louisville Law Review has obtained its highest position ever and now has the distinction of having the top law review in Kentucky as it pertains to the categories of cites per cost and citations from journal articles. br /bbr /Implementing a ‘culture of success’/bbr /br /Editor-in-Chief Daniel Reed attributes the rise in rankings to a “cumulative effect of content published over an 8-year period.” br /br /He specifically cites the efforts of editors-in-chief Mike Swansburg (Volume 48), Tommy Sturgeon (Volume 49), Elizabeth Fitzpatrick (Volume 50), Eddie O’Brien (Volume 51) and Benjamin Hardy (Volume 52). br /br /“Before their tenures, the Law Review was in pretty bad shape. Several specifics come to mind to help turn things around. The number of issues published per year was cut from 4 to 3. However, the amount of content stayed the same. This allowed for a decrease in our printing costs. This coupled with a more targeted approach to the budget allowed the law review to become financially self-sustaining, creating more flexibility for the organization,” Reed said. br /br /Additionally, editing efficiency became more of a priority. For example, the Law Review's Editing Submission Sheet (ESS), a standardized editing form, was created by a past Editorial Board, resulting in the Law Review being recognized for best practices and innovation in editing at the 2013 NCLR.br /br /The Law Review also began taking a more targeted approach to article selection, Reed said, calling this one of the most important changes that allowed for an increase in rankings. br /br /“The creation of an Article Selection Editor position on the board allowed for a person to be committed entirely to finding quality content. Second, the law review began to focus on factors likely to reflect in the rankings, including the author's credentials and past publication and citation history. Overall, the process was revamped to ensure that the law review was receiving content of the highest quality from well cited authors,” he said. br /br /Finally, Reed notes that the Law Review used to publish pieces from the Annual Warns-Render Institute, but it fell out of publication at one point. It was reinstated in Volume 50 and has since been one of the most well-cited issues each year. br /br /“Aside from the practical changes, I think these past boards have implemented a culture of success for our organization. By creating conditions that allow the Law Review to thrive, members can be proud of what we are able to accomplish,” Reed said. “Students, faculty, and alumni have a greater respect for law review than ever before. This helps us not only to continually attain top students but it makes our members more willing to put forth a dedicated effort in the interest of furthering the Law Review's mission of impactful scholarship.”br /br /bBanner year/bbr /br /It’s been a banner year for the Louisville Law Review and its members. Louisville played host to the 61st annual National Conference of Law Reviews in March. This marked the first time UofL hosted the event since 1986.br /br /The University of Louisville Law Review also began putting more focus on its digital presence. Reed and Andrew Weeks, online content editor, are on a mission to step up the Law Review’s online presence with more activity on its website, as well as through its Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn channels. The objective is to keep up with the times and to gain more exposure using tips learned at the NCLR event.  /ppbRankings and scores/b/ppHere is a look at the Louisville Law Review’s overall rankings among ranked U.S. journals from 2004-2014, including its scores from this year. /ppb2014 Categories, Ranking, Top, Score /b/ppOverall Ranking: 178/986, 18.1%, 14.5br /Impact: 193/986, 19.5%, 0.72br /Citations from Journal Articles: 175/986,17.7%, 660br /Currency Factor: 192/986, 19.4%, 1.17br /Citation of Articles in Cases: 321/986, 32.6%, 7br /Cost: 172/986, 17.4%, 2.35/ppbOverall Rankings/bbr /bYear, Ranking, Top, Score/bbr /2014: 178/986 18.1% 14.5br /2013: 241/987 24.4% 13.5br /2012: 318/967 32.9% 9.8br /2011: 294/966 30.4% 9.6br /2010: 275/972 28.3% 10.4br /2009: 258/933 27.7% 11.4br /2008: 256/901 28.4% 10.9br /2007: 234/800 29.3% 12br /2006: 277/760 36.4% 9.7br /2005: 244/699 34.9% 9.5br /2004: 288/703 41.0% 9.9/ppnbsp;/p

Louisville Law Review receives its highest national ranking ever

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 14:09
pWashington and Lee School of Law released its law review rankings for 2014, which included a 6-percent jump in the rankings for the University of Louisville Law Review. Among ranked U.S. journals, the Louisville Law Review now ranks in the top 18 percent nationwide, up from the top 24 percent just one year ago.br / br /With these scores, the Louisville Law Review has obtained its highest position ever and now has the distinction of having the top law review in Kentucky as it pertains to the categories of cites per cost and citations from journal articles. br /bbr /Implementing a ‘culture of success’/bbr /br /Editor-in-Chief Daniel Reed attributes the rise in rankings to a “cumulative effect of content published over an 8-year period.” br /br /He specifically cites the efforts of editors-in-chief Mike Swansburg (Volume 48), Tommy Sturgeon (Volume 49), Elizabeth Fitzpatrick (Volume 50), Eddie O’Brien (Volume 51) and Benjamin Hardy (Volume 52). br /br /“Before their tenures, the Law Review was in pretty bad shape. Several specifics come to mind to help turn things around. The number of issues published per year was cut from 4 to 3. However, the amount of content stayed the same. This allowed for a decrease in our printing costs. This coupled with a more targeted approach to the budget allowed the law review to become financially self-sustaining, creating more flexibility for the organization,” Reed said. br /br /Additionally, editing efficiency became more of a priority. For example, the Law Review's Editing Submission Sheet (ESS), a standardized editing form, was created by a past Editorial Board, resulting in the Law Review being recognized for best practices and innovation in editing at the 2013 NCLR.br /br /The Law Review also began taking a more targeted approach to article selection, Reed said, calling this one of the most important changes that allowed for an increase in rankings. br /br /“The creation of an Article Selection Editor position on the board allowed for a person to be committed entirely to finding quality content. Second, the law review began to focus on factors likely to reflect in the rankings, including the author's credentials and past publication and citation history. Overall, the process was revamped to ensure that the law review was receiving content of the highest quality from well cited authors,” he said. br /br /Finally, Reed notes that the Law Review used to publish pieces from the Annual Warns-Render Institute, but it fell out of publication at one point. It was reinstated in Volume 50 and has since been one of the most well-cited issues each year. br /br /“Aside from the practical changes, I think these past boards have implemented a culture of success for our organization. By creating conditions that allow the Law Review to thrive, members can be proud of what we are able to accomplish,” Reed said. “Students, faculty, and alumni have a greater respect for law review than ever before. This helps us not only to continually attain top students but it makes our members more willing to put forth a dedicated effort in the interest of furthering the Law Review's mission of impactful scholarship.”br /br /bBanner year/bbr /br /It’s been a banner year for the Louisville Law Review and its members. Louisville played host to the 61st annual National Conference of Law Reviews in March. This marked the first time UofL hosted the event since 1986.br /br /The University of Louisville Law Review also began putting more focus on its digital presence. Reed and Andrew Weeks, online content editor, are on a mission to step up the Law Review’s online presence with more activity on its website, as well as through its Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn channels. The objective is to keep up with the times and to gain more exposure using tips learned at the NCLR event.  /ppbRankings and scores/b/ppHere is a look at the Louisville Law Review’s overall rankings among ranked U.S. journals from 2004-2014, including its scores from this year. /ppb2014 Categories, Ranking, Top, Score /b/ppOverall Ranking: 178/986, 18.1%, 14.5br /Impact: 193/986, 19.5%, 0.72br /Citations from Journal Articles: 175/986,17.7%, 660br /Currency Factor: 192/986, 19.4%, 1.17br /Citation of Articles in Cases: 321/986, 32.6%, 7br /Cost: 172/986, 17.4%, 2.35/ppbOverall Rankings/bbr /bYear, Ranking, Top, Score/bbr /2014: 178/986 18.1% 14.5br /2013: 241/987 24.4% 13.5br /2012: 318/967 32.9% 9.8br /2011: 294/966 30.4% 9.6br /2010: 275/972 28.3% 10.4br /2009: 258/933 27.7% 11.4br /2008: 256/901 28.4% 10.9br /2007: 234/800 29.3% 12br /2006: 277/760 36.4% 9.7br /2005: 244/699 34.9% 9.5br /2004: 288/703 41.0% 9.9/ppnbsp;/p

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:49
Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at a href=mailto:karen.jordan@louisville.edukaren.jordan@louisville.edu/a.

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:49
Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at a href=mailto:karen.jordan@louisville.edukaren.jordan@louisville.edu/a.

Academic Credit for Summer Fall Externships

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:43
Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.br /br /The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Academic Credit for Summer Fall Externships

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:43
Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.br /br /The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:39
Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 13:39
Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

UofL E-mail Account Info for Graduating Students

Student News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 12:27
p If you're graduating in May or August, and not otherwise enrolled for other Fall 2015 classes, your UofL e-mail account (CardMail) will remain active until October, according to University IT's a href=http://louisville.edu/it/policies/opening-and-closing-accounts target=_blankinformation about opening and closing accounts/a. /p p However, if you would like to keep your UofL e-mail iaddress/i forever, you may register for the University Alumni Association's ba href=http://www.uoflalumni.org/s/1157/site2014/index.aspx?sid=1157amp;gid=1amp;pgid=502 target=_blankE-mail for Life/a/b. This is not a true e-mail account, but a forwarding service: Messages sent to iyouraddress@louisville.edu/i will be forwarded to the third-party e-mail account of your choosing, such as Gmail, Yahoo or any other personal or business e-mail account. /p

UofL E-mail Account Info for Graduating Students

Latest News - Thu, 04/30/2015 - 12:27
p If you're graduating in May or August, and not otherwise enrolled for other Fall 2015 classes, your UofL e-mail account (CardMail) will remain active until October, according to University IT's a href=http://louisville.edu/it/policies/opening-and-closing-accounts target=_blankinformation about opening and closing accounts/a. /p p However, if you would like to keep your UofL e-mail iaddress/i forever, you may register for the University Alumni Association's ba href=http://www.uoflalumni.org/s/1157/site2014/index.aspx?sid=1157amp;gid=1amp;pgid=502 target=_blankE-mail for Life/a/b. This is not a true e-mail account, but a forwarding service: Messages sent to iyouraddress@louisville.edu/i will be forwarded to the third-party e-mail account of your choosing, such as Gmail, Yahoo or any other personal or business e-mail account. /p