Academics News

SBF Donates $5,000 to Law Clinic

SBF DonationOn March 6, 2008, the University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law received $5,000 from the Student Bar Foundation for the school's new law clinic. This contribution will support the initial start-up of the clinic, scheduled for late 2008.

Emily Zahn, president of the Student Bar Foundation, explains the foundation's decision to support the clinic: "The new Law Clinic embodies The Student Bar Foundation's mission to deliver legal services to the indigent, support legal education, and improve the legal profession by providing citizen access to the justice system. We hope by supporting the clinic, we offer more opportunities for law students to be involved in public service in an ongoing and significant way."

The Law Clinic epitomizes the University of Louisville's commitment to preparing its graduates for instant and lasting impact in the workplace and the community at large. Dean Jim Chen remarks, "There simply is no better way to learn the law than handling real cases and representing real clients."

Stallings Professor of Law Lars S. Smith (pictured left) will act as director of the University of Louisville's law clinic during the 2008-09 school year. "Lars brings talent, experience, and vision to the University of Louisville Law Clinic. Throughout his academic career, he has maintained solid footing in the world of law practice. His experience in business and intellectual property law makes him uniquely well suited to supervise clinical operations that advance community development and assist lower-income individuals, entrepreneurs, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations," explains Dean Chen.

In addition to this generous student donation, the clinic has received grants from Kentucky Iolta and the Louisville Bar Foundation.

Howard C. Schwab Memorial Essay Contest

The ABA Section of Family Law is pleased to present its Howard C. Schwab Memorial Essay Contest. This contest is held annually to encourage interest in the field of family law. Not only does the contest encourage innovative thought in family law, but it also provides an opportunity for recognition and publication in the scholarly journal Family Law Quarterly.

Applicants may submit an essay on any aspect of Family Law and entrants are encouraged to write on subjects of national interest. However, if the law in one state reflects a significant development or trend, that too could be an appropriate subject for an entry. With the vast scope of family law, the possibilities are endless.

The breadth of originality and analysis of past winners is a great testament to the quality of our nation's law schools and educators. Past topics of winning essays include transsexuals and the legal determination of sex, same-sex marriages, federal responsibility for indigent elderly, interpretation of Islamic marriage contracts, the Indian Child Welfare Act, polygamy and marital counseling laws. We look forward to an outstanding pool of entries this year as we continue to marvel at the outstanding thought produced by future attorneys.

Additional information about the Schwab Memorial Essay Contest can be found at www.abanet.org/family/lawstudents/schwab.shtml. I hope you will share this with interested faculty and encourage students to participate. The deadline for entries is May 15, 2008.

If you have any questions regarding the essay contest, please contact Carrie Asalon of the Section of Family Law at 312-988-5145 or e-mail asalonc@staff.abanet.org.

NAELA Seeks Student Papers

Any student who is working on a paper or law review article on the intersection of law and aging, elder or disability planning should consider submitting it to the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys.  NAELA will select eight student articles from around the country to publish in the fall 2008 NAELA Student Journal.  The author of the best paper will be given a $1,500 cash prize and will be honored at the fall NAELA Institute (with $1,000 travel stipend).  Second and third place will receive $1,000 and $500.  Deadline: May 1.  See Dean Sealing if you are interested. 

Louisville Professor to Speak at the Seventh Annual Rabbi Seymour Siegel Memorial Lecture in Ethics

Louisville Law Professor Mark Rothstein will speak today (February 26, 2008) at Duke University's seventh annual Rabbi Seymour Siegel Memorial Lecture in Ethics. Rothstein will speak on "the legal and ethical implications of trangenerational environmental epigenetics." The lecture will be webcast live beginning at 12:10 today. For more information, please visit the Duke news site.

Bad Weather: Law School Closed Today, 2/21

Classes are canceled and offices are closed for February 21 beginning at 10 a.m. due to an approaching ice storm. See www.louisville.edu for details.

Samuel L. Greenebaum Award: Achievement in Legal Writing

This award is presented to the law student who demonstrates the highest degree of excellence and achievement in legal writing. Any written work, whether brief, article or memorandum, prepared during the preceding academic year shall be eligible for consideration. The award consists of a certificate, a cash award in the amount of $300, and recognition at the Awards program. 

Please provide legal writing submission to Rita Siegwald in Room 204 by Tuesday, March 18.

Brandeis Writing Award

The purpose of the Brandeis Writing Award is to promote Justice Brandeis' use of inter-disciplinary materials by recognizing high quality interdisciplinary writing among students at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law.

The $100 award will be announced at the Senior Awards program, Friday, May 9, and be awarded to the senior who has produced the best interdisciplinary writing. This includes, but is not limited to, papers, law review articles (including notes and comments), briefs, and papers written specifically for this competition. No more than one prize shall be given each year. If it is necessary to give more than one award, because of collaboration or a tie, the prize shall be divided equally between or among the winners. If no work is worthy of the award, then no award shall be given.

Nomination is permitted by students, faculty, and others.

The deadline for submission of work is Tuesday, March 18. Please submit it to Rita Siegwald in Room 204.

American Inns of Court Competition

The Warren E. Burger Writing Competition is designed to encourage outstanding scholarship that "promotes the ideals of excellence, civility, ethics and professionalism within the legal profession," the core mission of the American Inns of Court. The American Inns of Court invites judges, lawyers, professors, students, scholars and other authors to participate in the competition by submitting an original, unpublished essay of 10,000 to 25,000 words on a topic of their choice addressing issues of legal excellence, civility, ethics and professionalism. 

The deadline for submission is June 15, 2008.

For details about the award, please visit the American Inns of Court's Warren E. Burger page.

For information or questions, please contact Cindy Dennis, American Inns of Court Awards & Scholarship Coordinator, at 800-233-3590 ext. 104 or cdennis@innsofcourt.org

American Judges Association Essay Contest

The American Judges Association is sponsoring an essay contest on the topic, "Search and Seizure Arising From Motor Vehicle Stops," with prizes of $3,000, $1,500 and $1,000. The deadline for submission is June 2, 2008, and the length is 10-25 pages.

For more information go to the organization's website: http://aja.ncsc.dni.us/index.html and select  the link "Essay Contest."

What's Happening with Rooms 115, 117 and 119?

Over the last several days room 115 (the Academic Support office and 1L study aids library) and 119 (student mailboxes and other communications) have gotten new rugs and 117 (upper class study aids library and study area) was closed because it was used to store confidential materials from 115. We were lucky that the University was able to provide us with these badly needed new rugs for free despite the budget crunch. Rooms 117 and 119 are now back in operation and set up as they were prior to the disruption. Room 115 still needs to have the computer and phone hooked up and will have a new look when it opens.

I am also in the process of sorting through the various 1L study aids and eliminating obsolete ones. (Many thanks to the faculty, students and alums who have contributed to the collection over the years!) For example, I am taking the audio cassette sets off the shelves as I don't believe anyone can use them anymore. I will resume office hours in 115 next Monday, but, as always, my door is almost always open to room 216 and I can address matters involving Academic Support or Student Affairs from either venue. I apologize for any inconvenience this has caused.

-Dean Sealing