Alumni News

Nominate a Professor for the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award Trust

Wells Fargo is offering $25,000 to professors who inspire their students to change the world. Gail McKnight Beckman created the Beckman Award to benefit teachers who have inspired their former students to make a significant contribution to society. The award is given to current or former academic faculty members who have inspired their former students to “create an organization which has demonstrably conferred a benefit on the community at large.” Alternatively, the academic faculty member must have inspired their former students to “establish on a lasting basis a concept, procedure, or movement of comparable benefit to the community at large.”

The deadline is July 12, 2013.


Justice Brandeis Story Debuting on Louisville Life

June 1, 1916 is the 97th anniversary of Justice Brandeis' Senate confirmation. President Woodrow Wilson nominated him to the Supreme Court of the United States on January 28, 1916.

Professor Laura Rothstein was recently interviewed by KET for a story about Justice Louis D. Brandeis.   Special thanks to Scott Campbell, who was very helpful in providing background information for the story. 

In episode 720 of "Louisville Life", the author of Brandeis at 150: The Louisville Perspective talks about former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis and his life in Louisville.

You may view the archived video recording at KET's website.

 

 

 

Mark Rothstein Receives Louis D. Brandeis Privacy Award

Patient Privacy Rights, the nation’s leading health privacy advocacy organization, awarded its annual Louis D. Brandeis Privacy Award to Mark A. Rothstein on June 5, 2013 in Washington, DC.

Patient Privacy Rights established the award in 2012 to recognize significant intellectual, cultural, legal, scholarly, and technical contributions to the field of health information privacy. The award is given with the approval of the Brandeis family, and it will be awarded in conjunction with the Third International Summit on the Future of Health Privacy to be held at the Georgetown University Law Center.

Professor Rothstein holds the Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, and he also teaches at the Brandeis School of Law of the University of Louisville. He indicated why the award is especially meaningful to him.

“Brandeis  was born in Louisville, and his influence still permeates the city where I live and the university where I work. I am deeply honored to receive an award named after the person whose name is synonymous with privacy.”  

The other 2013 recipient of the Brandeis Privacy Award is Peter Hustinx of the Netherlands, Data Protections Supervisor of the European Union. The 2012 recipients were Congressman Joe Barton of Texas, Congressman Ed Markey of Massachusetts, and the late Professor Alan Westin of Columbia University.

Lawlapalooza 2013: Save the date, mate!

Lawlapalooza, the Louisville legal community's battle of the bands, returns to the Phoenix Hill Tavern, Thursday, October 17, 2013.

Stay tuned for more information, including band registration details. 

Tony Arnold Wins University Trustees Award

Professor Tony Arnold’s innovative educational methods and “unparalleled devotion to students” have won him the University of Louisville’s 2013 Trustees Award. The annual award, selected by the Board of Trustees, recognizes a faculty member for extraordinary impact on students and is considered by many to be the highest honor the University bestows on a faculty member. Arnold will receive a plaque and a $5,000 cash award and will give a speech at the University Commencement ceremonies in May 2013.

Arnold is the Boehl Chair in Property and Land Use at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law. He holds an affiliated appointment in the Department of Urban and Public Affairs and directs the Center for Land Use and Environmental Responsibility.

Twenty-nine of Arnold’s former students in law and urban planning wrote letters of support for Interim Dean Susan Duncan’s nomination of Arnold. When news of his selection was posted on Facebook, hundreds of his former students “liked” or commented on it.

The fact that Arnold remains connected with his former students, many of whom he counts as friends, says a lot about the importance of mentoring to him. He is grateful for the positive, lasting influence of his own mentors, which has motivated him to make mentoring a core part of his role as a teacher. He often goes out of his way to be available to help students. One student described Arnold as “a compassionate professor and mentor that always goes above and beyond his call of duty to see students succeed.” A former student talked about how Arnold’s belief in her helped her to overcome her under-confidence as an African American woman from a western Kentucky farm family. With his encouragement and support, she received a national fellowship from the American Association of University Women and went on to realize her dream of working on agriculture policy and justice with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, DC. Others wrote about how he connected them with a job or internship opportunity. Many students credited their professional and personal success to Arnold’s mentoring.

His students praised his innovative experiential-learning methods that integrate intellectual rigor with development of practical skills. They stated that his methods should be a national model for legal education and that his courses were among the best they had ever had. He teaches a Land Use and Planning Law class in which interdisciplinary teams of law and urban planning students work on service-learning projects for government agencies or nonprofit organizations. Many of these projects have actually influenced public policy, and one – an urban tree canopy plan for Louisville – won a statewide planning award. His Real Estate Transactions class is structured around simulated negotiation and drafting of complex transactional documents based on real-world examples. Student after student wrote about how they were able to use practical skills learned in Arnold’s classes in the professional world, but also were able to see issues deeply, critically, and from multiple disciplines.

Students also expressed great enthusiasm for Arnold’s field-study land and water conservation seminars, in which he organizes many extensive field trips that take students to the sites of real-world environmental issues, where they discuss them with the participants. One student wrote, “It is one thing to learn about the conservation efforts taking place at the Green River dam in the classroom; it is quite another thing to learn about them at the riverside from the people on the ground. The courses were extraordinary and Professor Arnold really highlighted the intersection of the law and extra-legal disciplines as a vehicle for collaborative problem solving.”

Arnold is not only a distinguished teacher and mentor but also an internationally renowned multidisciplinary scholar. He received the University’s top award for outstanding research and scholarship in the social sciences in 2011, and his publications have been cited by scholars, policy-makers, and professionals over 1700 times. Arnold’s students articulated the tremendous value of being taught by a prominent expert. His obvious enthusiasm for his subject matter has created a positive and effective learning environment, as well as research innovations that are influencing our ideas and institutions.

University Trustee Bruce Henderson stated that Arnold’s “approach to scholarship, teaching and practice is cutting-edge, dynamic, multi-dimensional, and practical.” Arnold states that he hopes to make a positive difference in the world, not only through his own research and public service but also through the impact that he has on the education and lives of his students.

Arnold received his Bachelor of Arts with Highest Distinction from the University of Kansas in 1987, and his Doctor of Jurisprudence with Distinction from Stanford University in 1990. After five years in law practice, he returned to Stanford Law School as a Teaching Fellow in 1995-96. He has taught at several universities and joined the University of Louisville in 2005.

 

Lindenberger Joins the The Dallas Morning News' Washington Bureau

Editors at The Dallas Morning News have announced the addition of Michael Lindenberger (Class of 2006) as a financial correspondent to the newspaper's Washington Bureau, beginning this summer. Michael worked at The Courier-Journal while a U of L law student and is a former editor-in-chief of the Louisville Cardinal. From a memo sent to the newspaper staff last week: 

We are pleased to announce that Michael Lindenberger will join the Washington bureau as our new government and business reporter. Michael is a stellar reporter who has covered transportation for The Dallas Morning Newssince 2007. He’ll start after wrapping up a Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University in June.

Trained as an attorney, Michael has put his formidable analytical skills to use exposing waste and management lapses at TxDOT, NTTA and DART. His coverage of lax ethics at the tollway authority prompted sweeping changes, and earned a Philbin Award from the Dallas Bar Association and a Pulitzer nomination from the DMN. After an initial two-year stint at The News, he covered state affairs for The Courier-Journal in his native Kentucky for four years before returning in 2007.

His new beat will be challenging: tracking influence, exploring the intersection of government and Texas business interests in Congress, within regulatory agencies, in the tax code and across the legal system. More generally, he’ll explain how federal decisions affect Texans’ lives and fortunes. Please join us in wishing him well.

~Todd Gillman and Dennis Fulton, The Dallas Morning News

 

Professor Abrams and Student Greg Justis Present at 2013 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference

Professor Jamie Abrams and Student Gregory Justis both presented papers last weekend at the 2013 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference. Professor Abrams' paper, "Enforcing Masculinities at the Border," explored how our immigration laws reinforce dominant masculinities at the border by excluding marginalized masculinities and admitting those who comport with dominant masculinity norms, enforcing masculinity norms at its borders. Greg's paper, "Defining “Union”: The Defense of Marriage Act, Tribal Sovereignty and Same-Sex Marriage," explored the potential impact of DOMA and related legislation on a recent trend towards tribal recognition of same-sex unions throughout the United States, as well as the likely impact of legal recognition on state, federal and tribal law. Congratulations to both of you!!

Helm, '82, Named Outstanding Corporate Counsel Diversity Champion

Congratulations to Lucy Lee Helm, '82, who was honored at the 2013 Corporate Counsel of the Year Awards on April 11!

Ms. Helm is the Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary at Starbucks Corp. She was declared the winner for the Outstanding Corporate Counsel Diversity Champion at an event in Washington. The Louisville Law alum spoke to students at the law school on February 7 for a professional development event.

Source: "Corporate Counsel of the Year 2013 winners announced" (Puget Sound Business Journal)



Kay Wolf, '75, Builds School in Cambodia

Sipping wine at the beach last summer, Orlando lawyer Kay Wolf (class of 1975) was reading an inspiring book and had an epiphany that would lead to building a school in a rural village in Cambodia that bears the name of her law firm: The FordHarrison School.

Working on writing an article on educating women in Third World countries, Wolf was rereading the best-selling book by husband-wife Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn: Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide.

Wolf focused on a chapter about Bernard Krisher, who retired from Newsweek and founded World Assistance for Cambodia, and is quoted as saying it’s easier to educate girls than rescue them from brothels. Krisher created the foundation that helps donors build schools in the poorest areas of rural Cambodia for $15,000 each.

Wolf thought: “I could raise $15,000! What a great opportunity for the firm!”

Read more about her venture in "A Florida lawyer’s summer daydream builds a Cambodian school" (The Florida Bar News, Volume 40, Number 5).

Welcome Justice John Paul Stevens!

Louis D. Brandeis School of Law proudly announces our 2013 Brandeis Medal recipient, Justice John Paul Stevens. The medal will be presented at a dinner on April 18, 2013.

The life work of Justice Stevens is very much in keeping with the values of Justice Brandeis. His service on the Court and his commitment to civility and a balanced approach to issues are values and qualities that Justice Brandeis would have applauded. He shares with Justice Brandeis an interest in antitrust law, free speech, search and seizure, and the role of state governments. His commitment to public service has been honored at many law schools through Justice John Paul Stevens Public Interest Fellowships.
 
Justice Stevens traces his seat on the Court directly to Justice Brandeis. When Justice Brandeis left the Court, he was replaced by Justice William O. Douglas, and when Justice Douglas retired, Justice Stevens was appointed to that position. Justice Elena Kagan was appointed to replace Justice Stevens. In his 2011 book, Five Chiefs: A Supreme Court Memoir, Justice Stevens describes the history of the Court by reflecting on the five Chief Justices of the Supreme Court with whom he served during his service from 1975 to 2010.
 
The Brandeis Medal is awarded to individuals whose lives reflect Justice Brandeis’ commitment to the ideals of public service. Previous recipients include Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O’Connor, Harry A. Blackmun, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen G. Breyer; Judges A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr. and Abner J. Mikva; New York District Attorney Robert Morgenthau; Professors Archibald Cox, Jr.; Professors Samuel Dash and Charles J. Ogletree; civil rights attorney Morris Dees, Jr.; Senator Howard H. Baker; Congressman John Lewis; Brandeis biographer Melvin Urofsky, and legal journalist Linda Greenhouse.


The 2013 Brandeis Medal Presentation and Dinner is made possible through funds provided by the Wilson W. and Anne D. Wyatt Distinguished Speakers Endowment.