Faculty News

2014 Boehl Distinguished Lecture in Land Use Policy

Boehl Distinguished Lecture in Land Use Policy
The University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law
"The Public Trust Doctrine: Our Inherent and Inalienable Property Right"
Professor Mary Christina Wood, Philip H. Knight Professor of Law
Faculty Director, Environmental and Natural Resources Law Center
University of Oregon
Thursday, April 10, 2014
6:00 p.m.
Room 275, Brandeis School of Law, University of Louisville
Reception Immediately Following Outside Room 275
Open to the public (no RSVP needed).

Mary Christina Wood is the Philip H. Knight Professor of Law and Faculty Director for the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Program at the University of Oregon. Professor Wood’s primary scholarly and teaching interests focus on natural resources law, climate change, property law, native law, and the environment. Her innovative sovereign trust approach to global climate policy is reshaping how we think about the environment and has been the foundation of atmospheric trust litigation brought on behalf of children nationwide and worldwide. Her most recent landmark work on the subject is Nature’s Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

The Boehl Distinguished Lecture Series in Land Use Policy is one of several law and policy initiatives in land use and environmental responsibility at the University of Louisville, and is supported by the Herbert Boehl Fund, the Kentucky Research Challenge Trust Fund, and the Center for Land Use & Environmental Responsibility.

Winter Bar Publications

The March 2014 issue of Louisville magazine features its annual "Top Lawyers" report. Several of the law school's graduates are listed among the honorees, beginning on page 60. Among those profiled include land use and zoning specialist Deborah A. Bilitski, '95 (page 61), criminal defense attorney Scott C. Cox, '85 (page 64), and social security and disability law attorney Alvin D. Wax, '71 (page 72). 2013 Alumni Fellow, Stephen Porter, is also profiled in "Counsel for Yesteryear" on page 55.

Here are some more highlights:

  • "What is your favorite courtroom movie?" (page 8)
  • "Thomson Smillie 1942-2014" by Keith L. Runyon, '82 (page 109)

Tax & Finance Law is the theme of the March 2014 Bar Briefs issue.

Here are some highlights:

  • "UofL Highlights the Importance of Tax and Finance Law" by Dean Susan Duncan (page 6)
  • "Historically High Estate Tax Exemption Shifts Attention Toward Income Taxes" by Nicholas A. Volk, '09 (page 7)
  • "Crisscross Law: Tax & Finance" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 15)
  • "Requirements for Disinterment by Private Landowners" by Marlow P. Riedling, '11 (page 20)
  • "Members on the move" (page 23)

Civil rights and diversity are the theme of the February 2014 Bar Briefs issue.

Here are some highlights:

  • "Diversity Among Top Priorities at Brandeis" by Dean Susan Duncan (page 6)
  • "Bench & Bar Social" photo gallery (page 12)
  • "This Year's Honorees" (page 14)
  • "Crisscross Law" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 21)
  • "Members on the move" (page 23)

Legal Issues for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Community is the theme of the January 2014 issue of Bench & Bar. The law school's column mentions Professors Laura Rothstein, Jamie Abrams, Sam Marcosson and how they're exploring LGBT issues in their curriculum. Greg Justis, 3L, is also cited for his paper, "Defining Union: The Defense of Marriage Act, Tribal Sovereignty and Same-Sex Marriage".

Several Louisville alums are featured in "Who, What, When & Where" on page 43 and Thomas E. Schweitz's, '90, bio appears "In Memoriam" on page 52.

Each publication is available in the law library.

Central High School Law and Government Magnet Program to Dedicate New Courtroom/Classroom

The Law and Government Magnet program was established at Central High School in 1986.  Partnerships with the Louisville Bar Association (beginning in 1992) and the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law (beginning in 2001) have built on the success of the program.  Students in the program now serve in summer internships facilitated by the LBA and are taught substantive law and writing skills related to law by law students from the Brandeis School of Law.  Central students have participated in national court competitions through the program and two students placed first and second nationally in 2011.  

In recognition of the success of the program, the Jefferson County Public School System has renovated the law and government magnet classroom to create a moot court space.  The new configuration will allow students to practice courtroom skills and to apply what they are learning in that setting.  The classroom will be dedicated on March 25, 2014, at 11:00 am at Central High School.  Superintendent Donna Hargens will cut the ribbon at the event.  Fred Moore is the first Central student to participate in the program developed by the Brandeis School of Law to receive a law degree.  He is now an attorney in the Public Defender’s Office and he will deliver remarks on this special occasion.  

Everyone who has been involved with the Central Partnership is encouraged to attend. 

Trustees Award

The Board of Trustees of the University of Louisville established The Trustees Award in 1989 to honor faculty who individually impact the future of our students.  (Note:  in the world you are but one person, but to one person you are the world.)  The award is intended to recognize faculty (full- or part-time; undergraduate, graduate, or professional; even groups of faculty) who have had, currently or in the past, an extraordinary impact on students.  The recipient will receive a $5,000 cash award and a commemorative plaque, which will be presented at University Commencement ceremonies in May, 2014. A plaque will also be placed in the Student Activities Center in honor of the recipient.  Members of the Board of Trustees provide the cash award through personal gifts to the University of Louisville Foundation, Inc.  The 2014 award will be announced prior to Commencement.  All faculty (with the exception of previous winners - Abramson and Arnold) are eligible to receive this award.  Nominations will be accepted from any member of the University community (faculty/students/staff/administrators/ Trustees) until March 18, 2014.

The nomination must consist of the Nomination Form and letters of support outlining the nominee’s qualifications and contributions to the University community. The award form can be downloaded at http://www.louisville.edu/president/trustees/TrusteeAward.doc.

Nominations should be submitted to The Trustees Award Committee, Board of Trustees, University of Louisville, 102 Grawemeyer Hall, Belknap Campus, Louisville, KY 40292.

Brandeis Law School Team Wins Chicago Regional Transactional Competition

UofL Louis D. Brandeis School of Law’s Transactional LawMeet team has won the Chicago Regional Round of the 2014 competition.  Team members Kiera Hollis (3L) and Michael McGee (3L) were coached by Professor Lisa Nicholson.  This victory came in just the second year of the Law School’s participation in this competition.  Unlike the typical law school moot court competition that focuses on litigation skills, the Transactional LawMeet Competition is designed to allow students who have an interest in corporate law-related matters to match skills and wits in drafting and negotiating transactional documents.

During the course of the two-month Regional Competition, team members were tasked with drafting a Supplemental Indemnification Agreement (as well as providing a subsequent mark-up of opposing counsel's proposed Agreement) in connection with third-party intellectual property claims that arose on the eve of their client's execution of a Stock Purchase Agreement.  The law students also participated in two separate hours-long conference calls with their client to ensure that the resulting proposed document would meet the client's objectives.  The Regional Competition concluded on February 28, 2014, when the team met in Chicago, IL for two rounds of face-to-face negotiations against assigned teams of opposing counsels -- one from the University of Kansas -- where they successfully scored a 1st place ranking for their efforts in representing their client, NSPC.

As a result, Kiera Hollis and Michael McGee will be participating in the National Rounds in New York, NY on April 4-5, 2014.  This is truly a spectacular feat in light of the fact that only 14 of the 84 participating teams advanced to the next round.  The National Rounds will be hosted by the law firm, Sullivan & Cromwell LLP.

The UofL team also would like to extend congratulations to the University of Kansas team for advancing to the National Rounds as well.  See you in New York!

Course Schedules for Fall 2014 and Spring 2015

The course schedules for Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 are posted on the Law School webpage under “Academics” at “Resources.”  These schedules are tentative and may change prior to registration.  Check the webpage for the most current schedule.  Contact Associate Dean Nowka if you have any questions.

 

Professor Trucios-Haynes to Speak at the Civil Rights CLE this Friday

The LBA's new Human Rights Section was formed with a focus on immigration, civil rights (race, LGBTQ, women), international law and human trafficking. Their second seminar on Civil Rights and the Federal Court 50 Years Later will be held this Friday, March 7. Professor Trucios-Haynes will guide attendees though the right to counsel in international law, specifically the Avena case, a recent SCOTUS decision.

Student registration is just $15. Call the LBA to register for the CLE (502) 583-5314 or visit the Louisville Bar Association.

 

Boston Globe Recognizes Research of UofL Law Professor

Written By Rebecca Sears

Last Sunday's Boston Globe featured a lengthy article on the "modern progressive's moral conundrum" regarding fetal personhood. It was the lead story in the paper’s “Ideas” section. The author drew largely from UofL law professor Luke Milligan’s research on John Rawls and fetal personhood. Professor Milligan is quoted a handful of times in the article.

In the article Milligan explained how the wide use of the fetal ultrasound, beginning in the 1970s, has “forced us to come to terms with the similarities between fetuses and born children.” Milligan suggested in the article that there hasn’t been sufficient reflection on fetal rights within progressive circles. "It has become this conundrum, this intersection of human rights," said Milligan. "It's incumbent on modern progressives to focus on the intersections of those rights, and figure out how best to mediate those conflicting rights."

Professor Milligan explained to me that fetal personhood is a tough issue to write and talk about. He says that “many shy away from it because of the perceived implications for abortion rights--and anytime you get close to the abortion issue (particularly as a man) you invite some backlash.” Milligan clarifies that “fetal personhood is not a thinly-veiled religious claim about abortion; it's not even a conservative claim; rather it's a progressive claim about human rights—the human rights of the fetus.” He explains that “the claim is not grounded in God or tradition, but rather in a humanistic morality—the same morality that drives progressive views on civil rights, capital punishment, immigration, animal rights, and the environment.” Yet for a variety of reasons, Milligan says, “fetal personhood is the progressive issue that dare not speak its name.”       

Milligan joined the UofL faculty in 2008 after working as a criminal defense lawyer with the Williams & Connolly law firm in Washington, D.C. Milligan says that “teaching law at UofL is a terrific job. Many of my colleagues are leaders in their fields, and I get to think, write, and speak about the issues I feel are important. There’s nothing I’d rather do with my life.”  

Reflections of The Mighty Walk

Stephen T. Porter's picture

In "The Mighty Walk" (Liberty Magazine, May/June 2013), 2013 Alumni Fellow, Stephen T. Porter, '68, reflects upon the  events that led to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit to the law school on March 30, 1967.

While on a break from classes at Duke University, he joined thousands of protesters at that monumentous rally in Montgomery, Alabama on March 25, 1965. It was there that he bonded with six young African-American college students who gathered together to hear the great orator speak. Just two years later, the legendary civil rights leader accepted the invitation of Mr. Porter and his classmates to speak at the law school.

The march into the city was on streets lined by locals taunting and cursing with racial epithets, but the crowd of marchers dominated the city that day and made its presence felt not only to the local populace and state leaders but also to the nation as a whole. The national press decided to cover this whole event (some claimed it was only because a White minister had been killed). More than 25,000 marchers heard the speakers ask for the right to vote for all citizens of Alabama. Best known of those speeches was certainly the one by Martin Luther King, sometimes referred to as the “How Long, Not Long” or the “Our God Is Marching On” speech.

Visit Liberty Magazine to read the full story.

The public is invited to view several of the rare photos included in the story at a free event on Friday, February 28 to celebrate Black History Month. The Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Dedication & Graduates of Color Reunion will begin at 5:30 PM in the Allen Courtroom.

Law Librarian, Robin Harris, was recently interviewed about the special collection by WFPL News in their report, "University of Louisville to Unveil Never-Before Seen Martin Luther King Jr. Photos". She also participated in a video produced by UofL's Office of Communications & Media, "UofL Remembers MLK visit", that includes testimonials of students who were in attendance on that historic day. 

University IT Closing Computer Repair April 30

University IT's personal computer repair service will close permanently April 30, 2014. This change only affects repair for personally purchased computer hardware. Repairs in progress will be completed, but no additional equipment will be accepted for repair after this date. Help with malware removal, passwords and other software-related issues will remain available from the iTech Connect office located on the lower level of Miller Information Technology Center (where McAlister's is located).