Faculty News

Law student spearheads development of Study Kentucky

Third year law student Ted Farrell has led the development of Study Kentucky, a consortium of Kentucky universities and colleges whose mission is to recruit international students to study in Kentucky. Prior to entering law school at UofL, Farrell's career at Hanover College allowed him to teach in Belize, France, and French Polynesia; perform research in West Africa and Latin America; and advise international students and faculty from around the world. Farrell plans to practice immigration law.

For more information, read the complete story, "Kentucky colleges, universities unite to recruit international students" or view the webcast.

Get your Mardi Gras on!

maskIt's Carnival Time and everybody's going to have fun! Yep. We're having a Mardi Gras party, so mark your calendars now.

On Tuesday, February 16, at 11:40 a.m.-1:00 p.m., and again at 5:00-6:00, in the law school mosaic lobby, Mardi Gras comes to the Brandeis School of Law.

The menu is a Fat Tuesday sort of menu: nachos (tortilla chips, cheese sauce (in crock pots), salsa, and jalapenos) with a faux King Cake.

 

musician

We'll have a great sound track to play. Lots of Professor Longhair.

 

OH, and BEADS! beads

Put on your masks, get out your best purple, green and gold costume, and bring your umbrellas. We'll be doing a line dance to Al "Carnival Time" Johnson. Oh yeah.

So SAVE THE DATE!!!

And if the mention of Prof. Longhair makes you want to party right now, here's his # 1 Mardi Gras song, Big Chief: http://www.mardigrasdigest.com/Media/Radio/Professor Longhair - Big Chief.mp3

 

August 2009 Flood Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the morning of August 4, 2009, record-breaking rains fell in central Louisville and surrounding counties between 7 am and 10 am EDT, with reported hourly rainfall rates as high as 8.83 inches. The Louisville Free Public Library's main branch and the University of Louisville's Belknap and Health Sciences campuses were particularly hard hit by the deluge.

The University of Louisville Libraries recently launched the August 2009 Flood Collection. It's their first community-created collection containing digital videos and selected images, including some taken of the law library, and is devoted to documenting one of the worst floods in Louisville's history.

In an effort to preserve images recorded by community members during and after the flood, an archived community collection documenting the storm and its aftermath was created. In addition to preserving multimedia files donated by community members, the University of Louisville Libraries entered into a partnership with Archive-It to preserve web-based content relating to the flash flood.

New Books Have Arrived

Catalog of Faculty Scholarship

Catalog of Faculty Scholarship

The first ever comprehensive compilation of our faculty's scholarhip has been released.

Highlights include each faculty member's biography, a list of their publications, and an index arranged by courses taught and areas of expertise.

This catalog reports our faculty's enduring contributions to legal education the legal profession, and the broader communities served by lawyers and law professors. ~Dean Jim Chen

Print copies are available for purchase in the Resource Center across from room 275 or by contacting (502) 852-1246. Digital copies are available for download online.

Photo Gallery: The Place of Religion in Public Life - A Debate

Library's Basement & Lab Re-Open

The law library's basement and basement lab have finally re-opened after having incurred severe damage during the August 2009 floods.

Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky

PRESS RELEASE

UofL Law Library Enhances Its Digital Collection

January 6, 2010

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The University of Louisville Law Library, in conjunction with University Libraries, has enhanced its digital collection with the addition of 88 plates from H. Levin's Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky (1897).  The illustrations are portraits of lawyers active in Kentucky’s first century of statehood. The persons portrayed include the nationally famous, like U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan and Senator Henry Clay, but the majority of the illustrations are of lawyers whose greatest prominence was in the cities and towns of Kentucky where they practiced their trade.  The Law Library Collection can be accessed at http://digital.library.louisville.edu/collections/law/.

Lawyers and Lawmakers of Kentucky is an important biographical source for information about the Kentucky bench and bar in the 19th century.  The 777-page encyclopedia attempted to capture the geographical breadth of the state’s legal community in 1897 by surveying all of Kentucky’s disparate regions. While most of the work consists of detailed biographies, there are also historical sketches of legal institutions and articles on the bench and bar of Kentucky’s cities, towns and counties.

Good copies of the original 1897 edition are relatively rare.  The Southern Historical Press published a xerographically reproduced edition in 1982 that is available in many libraries, but the reprint edition made little attempt to replicate the 88 high-quality illustrations in any detail. This collection attempts to remedy this by digitizing these illustrations. They derive from an unusually well-preserved copy of the original work found in the rare books collection of the University of Louisville Law Library.  

The Law Library’s digital collection draws on the varied collections of the Law Library of the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. The first titles to be made available were the William Littell's Statute Law of Kentucky, which compiles all the legal enactments relating to Kentucky from its beginning as a district of Virginia to 1819, and Report of the Debates and Proceedings of the Convention for the Revision of the Constitution of the State of Kentucky (1849), a rare transcript of the debates of the convention that drafted Kentucky's third constitution.

For more information, contact Virginia M. Smith at (502) 852-2075.

Snow Policy

The Law School follows the University’s bad weather policy and announcements.

If the University announces that classes are closed for the day, then the Law School is closed that day.  If the University announces that classes will be delayed (starting at 10:00 am, for example) then Law School classes beginning  before 10:00 am are cancelled and classes that begin at or after 10:00 am will meet at their regular time and for their regular length of time.

The University announces its bad weather decisions at the top of the University homepage, www.louisville.edu,  by direct email and text message to those of have signed up for this service and through local media.

The Law School’s policy is written in paragraph X of the Student Handbook, which is quoted here:

“X.  Bad Weather Schedule
The Law School follows the University’s lead in all weather-related cancellations and delays. 

1)  We will cancel classes up to a certain time and begin with our full class schedule at that point. For instance, if we delay opening until 10:00 a.m., all classes that begin before 10:00 a.m. will be cancelled.  Classes meeting at 10:00 a.m. and later will meet at their regular times and will include the full instruction period.

2)  For purposes of this policy, evening classes will be defined as any classes beginning at or after 4:15 p.m.

3)  Please note that the University will provide official school closing information in the following ways:  A notice at the top of the University home page, www.louisville.edu; e-mails sent to all students and employees on their Groupwise accounts; a recorded message at 852-5555. 
These are the only venues through which we can guarantee accurate information.  They are the first three methods by which we will communicate, although we will continue to announce our decisions through media as well.”

Professor Marcosson is Quoted in Time Magazine

Professor Sam Marcosson was quoted in an article in Time magazine, "A Gay-Marriage Lawsuit Dares to Make Its Case" (January 5, 2010). The article was written by Michael A. Lindenberger, a 2006 graduate of the University of Louisville's Brandeis School of Law.

"The stakes are extremely high," adds law professor Samuel Marcosson of the University of Louisville, author of Original Sin: Clarence Thomas and the Failure of the Constitutional Conservatives. "I think the plaintiffs are (unfortunately) very likely to lose — at least if the case makes it all the way to the Supreme Court — and set a precedent that didn't need to be, and shouldn't have been, set. The case was premature and ill-advised."