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Professor Weaver participates in New Media World 2015 conference in Hungary

Professor Russ Weaver spoke on "The Internet and Democracy" at the New Media World conference this week in Hungary.

His talk examined advances in speech technology over the centuries, and the efforts of so-called “Gatekeepers” to control the use of those technologies, thereby limiting and controlling the ability of ordinary people to engage in mass communication.

The event is hosted by the Institute for Media Studies that the Media Council of the National Media and Infocommunications Authority (NMHH).

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

 

Pre-registration is open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

 

Academic Credit for Summer Judicial Externships

Students in good academic standing and who have completed the 1L curriculum may earn academic credit for a summer judicial externship.  Judicial Externships provide students with many opportunities not available in a classroom: observing lawyers, judges, and other members of the justice system at work; developing research and writing skills, and applying doctrine learned in law school; assessing the skills and styles of attorneys and judges; analyzing the effectiveness of the legal system; and networking and developing as a member of the legal profession.  To earn two credit hours, students must devote 104 hours to externship field work (generally 16 hours per week for 6.5 weeks).  The time is spent observing courtroom proceedings, discussing issues with the supervising judge or court personnel, or worrking on research and writing projects.  Students may arrange an externship with any judge.  For more information, contact Professor Karen Jordan at karen.jordan@louisville.edu.

Academic Credit for Summer & Fall Externships

Pre-registration remains open for externships for the summer and fall 2015 semesters.  Externships allow students to earn academic credit for time spent observing and performing legal work at various placement sites away from the law school.  Externships allow students to (1) develop lawyering skills and professional identity while working as part of a team of legal providers serving real clients; (2) network with lawyers and judges in the community; (3) learn new law, or reinforce understanding of legal concepts learned in the classroom; (4) learn about specific practice settings, including how lawyers balance expectations and tensions; and (5) assess possible career paths.

The law school has arranged externships at many and varied placement sites, each offering unique learning opportunities for students.  Amount of academic credit varies, but for each hour of credit earned students ordinarily are expected to devote 56 hours per semester to field work.  Students ordinarily should have blocks of 3-4 hours at a time for field work.  For fall 2015, the course schedule has been designed so that Tuesday afternoons should be available for most students for part of their externship work.  For more information, review the course schedule and see the TWEN course titled “Externship INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Kentucky Innocence Project in 2015-2016

Pre-registration remains open for the KIP course for 2015-16.  Any student in good academic standing who has completed the 1L curriculum is eligible to participate.  The course is taught by an attorney and an investigator with the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.  Students work in teams to explore whether KIP clients have a basis for exoneration or other post-conviction relief, and learn fundamental investigative and case management skills that are relevant and helpful to any practice setting.  Teams are expected to locate, gather, and examine information relevant to the process that led to a client’s conviction (e.g., courthouse files, trial attorney notes and materials, etc.): to explore potential arguments supporting a claim for relief; and to engage in investigatory work that might bring to light supporting evidence.  The work will include client and witness interviews, and may involve drafting motions and accompanying arguments.  The externship includes a classroom component, and requires enrollment in both fall and spring semesters.  For more information, please see the TWEN course titled “Kentucky Innocence Project INFORMATION.”  Pre-registration forms are available from TWEN, and outside rooms 216 and 287.

Road Closures Saturday, April 25

On Saturday, April 25th, thousands of runners from all 50 states and several foreign countries will flood the streets of Louisville to compete in the Kentucky Derby Festival's Marathon and miniMarathon. While this is very exciting, it will cause major traffic disruptions.

The race begins at the corner of Brook Street and Main Street at 7:30 AM and is expected to end by 1:30 PM. The route winds from downtown, through Old Louisville, to Iroquois Park and passes by Belknap Campus at 3rd and 4th Streets. Refer to this list of street closures for details.

The law library will be open from 8 AM to 6 PM Saturday. Visitors who are travelling by car are encouraged to park in lots that are accessible east of Third Street. Several bus routes, including the popular #29, will encounter slight detours from roughly 7:30 AM to 2:30 PM. Visit TARC for details.

Professor Fischer reflects on teaching career as retirement approaches

Professor Judy Fischer is retiring from Brandeis School of Law at the end of the school year. She joined the faculty in 2000 after a somewhat unconventional path.

Professor Fischer grew up in Peoria, Illinois, and received her undergraduate degree from Bradley University. At that time, she said, there were very few women enrolled in law schools, so receiving a J.D. wasn’t on her radar.

Instead, she taught English and French on and off for 14 years, mostly at the high school level. She also spent some time teaching religion, teaching Head Start students and teaching at Bradley.

I really loved teaching, but eventually I wanted to do something else because the pay was low,” Professor Fischer said. “I wanted to be able to buy a house and to travel.”

Also, she said many teachers were treated “mechanically,” not professionally. This inspired her to consider law school.

“By that time, more women were represented at law schools. It made sense to me because I am interested in everything that goes into the study of law – verbal and written expression, political and sociological issues,” Professor Fischer said.

In 1978, she began her legal studies at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. She ended up on the West Coast simply because she wanted to explore new places. Plus, “there were no law schools in Peoria.”

After graduation, Professor Fischer took a job at a large law firm headquartered in LA and Long Beach. She worked mostly in civil litigation for 10 years, with cases ranging from criminal to personal injury and from real estate to savings and loan cases.

She liked it a lot, but things were changing.

It was becoming more of a business. I had envisioned being in a profession more than a business,” Professor Fischer said.

So, she returned to her roots and began teaching again. She spent four years at the University of Cincinnati Law School, beginning in 1991, then moved to Chapman University School of Law in Southern California, where she spent five years.

At the time, Chapman’s law school was brand new and was experiencing some growing pains that motivated Professor Fischer to send her resume into a national clearinghouse for law professors.

She was contacted by Brandeis Professor Kathy Bean, who retired last year.

“One of the things that interested me about Brandeis was its long history. It was nice to have that and was the opposite of Chapman,” Professor Fischer said.

In 2000, Professor Fischer joined the faculty at Brandeis School of Law, with a focus on legal writing, legal skills and women and the law. From 2005-09, she chaired the Professional Skills Program Committee, which proposed and facilitated the opening of the Robert and Sue Ellen Ackerman Law Clinic. The clinic provides law students an opportunity to represent clients who are victims of domestic violence or who have eviction cases.

“The trend at that time was to have more skills training opportunities in place. I felt we needed to be more proactive,” Professor Fischer said.

From 2002-05, she also chaired the International Committee, which brought in professors from law schools around the world.

Additionally, Professor Fischer is a contributing editor to the Legal Writing Prof Blog, which was listed among the ABA Journal’s top 100 blogs for both 2012 and 2013. She was also on the editorial board of a national journal titled “Legal Writing: Journal of the Legal Writing Institute” from 2006-2014, and is currently a member of the Kentucky Bench & Bar publications committee.

Professor Fischer said her favorite part about teaching is conveying to students all of the skills that will help them in their professional life.

Last year, her colleagues nominated her to receive the Blackwell Award, calling her a “tireless champion for her students” and “a selfless, unassuming expert who is generous with her time and wisdom.”

“I am grateful to have had the opportunity to be on the faculty here. I have taught some excellent students here. It is a pleasure to see many of them blossoming and doing great work,” Professor Fischer said.

Professor Fischer said she has no immediate plans on the horizon. She may focus on her hobbies – gardening, reading, sewing and painting. She may also volunteer teaching children how to read or for an ESL program. The use of language, she said, has always been an interest.

Professor Fischer often shares her favorite piece of advice to her students: “Do well and do good.”

As she embarks upon new adventures, those of us at Brandeis School of Law wish her the same.

Dean Duncan presenting at Univ. of Oregon Legal Writing Leadership conference

Dean Susan Duncan will present at the University of Oregon's 2015 Northwest Regional Legal Writing Conference this weekend. The conference is hosted by the University's Legal Research and Writing Program. 

This year’s theme, Legal Writing & Leadership, will explore the ways that legal writing faculty have achieved success through leadership, both inside and outside the field of legal writing.

On Friday, Dean Duncan will participate in a plenary panel discussion on legal writing and leadership.

Joining her on the panel are Darby Dickerson, Dean of Texas Tech University School of Law, Pamela Lysaght, former Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of Detroit Mercy School of Law, Carol Parker, former Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of University of Tennessee College of Law, and Judy Stinson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

The panel will be moderated by Suzanne Rowe from the University of Oregon School of Law.