Latest News

Law School Welcomes Fulbright Scholar

Please welcome Binh Q. Nguyen, a Fulbright Scholar from Vietnam, who will be visiting for 8-9 months.    

Mr. Nguyen's project while here is" Harmonization of Law for Economic Development in Vietnam & Impacts for the Vietnam-United States Bilateral Trade Agreement Toward this Process".  The project is focused on the major efforts & experiences of Vietnam in harmonizing national laws and regulations for the attainment of its development goals during the 1991-2001 period, the impacts of the UN-Vietnam BRA toward the legislative reform process for 2001-2007, and their indications toward future US-Vietnam trade relations.  

Mr. Nguyen is currently the Director of NBC Law Firm in Vietnam.  Some of his accomplishments include Recognition of Excellence by Harvard Law School/ITP; Director General of the Legal Department of MOFA; Ambassador & Permanent  Representative of Vietnam to the UN, CD & WTO in Geneva; Chief Negotiator on Post-war Issues with the US, and in Land-Sea Boundary Delimitations with Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, China, and Cambodia; and Part-time lecturer in some universities abroad (Australia, UK and the US).

What's New In the Library

Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam

Are you planning to take the MPRE this year?  The MPRE will be administered on the following three dates in 2010:

  • Saturday, March 6, 2010  (late application receipt deadline 2/11/10)
  • Friday, August 6, 2010 (application deadline 6/29/10)
  • Saturday, November 6, 2010 (application deadline 9/28/10)

For applications received on or before the regular receipt deadline, the fee for the MPRE is $63. For those who apply after the regular receipt deadline but before the late application receipt deadline, the fee is $126. This fee entitles you to receive a copy of your scores and to have a copy sent to the board of bar examiners of the jurisdiction you indicate on your answer sheet on test day.

Applicants may register for the MPRE online or by mail.  The online version of the 2010 MPRE Information Booklet and registration information appears at www.ncbex.org.  Paper application packets are available from Ms. Kimberly Ballard, Room 212. 

 

 

Law student spearheads development of Study Kentucky

Third year law student Ted Farrell has led the development of Study Kentucky, a consortium of Kentucky universities and colleges whose mission is to recruit international students to study in Kentucky. Prior to entering law school at UofL, Farrell's career at Hanover College allowed him to teach in Belize, France, and French Polynesia; perform research in West Africa and Latin America; and advise international students and faculty from around the world. Farrell plans to practice immigration law.

For more information, read the complete story, "Kentucky colleges, universities unite to recruit international students" or view the webcast.

Get your Mardi Gras on!

maskIt's Carnival Time and everybody's going to have fun! Yep. We're having a Mardi Gras party, so mark your calendars now.

On Tuesday, February 16, at 11:40 a.m.-1:00 p.m., and again at 5:00-6:00, in the law school mosaic lobby, Mardi Gras comes to the Brandeis School of Law.

The menu is a Fat Tuesday sort of menu: nachos (tortilla chips, cheese sauce (in crock pots), salsa, and jalapenos) with a faux King Cake.

 

musician

We'll have a great sound track to play. Lots of Professor Longhair.

 

OH, and BEADS! beads

Put on your masks, get out your best purple, green and gold costume, and bring your umbrellas. We'll be doing a line dance to Al "Carnival Time" Johnson. Oh yeah.

So SAVE THE DATE!!!

And if the mention of Prof. Longhair makes you want to party right now, here's his # 1 Mardi Gras song, Big Chief: http://www.mardigrasdigest.com/Media/Radio/Professor Longhair - Big Chief.mp3

 

WEEKLY ACADEMIC SUCCESS TIP - Staying Organized

Being organized is essential to being a good attorney.  Law school is a great place to learn better organizational skills.  Here are some tips that can improve your organization:

  • Keep all of your law school study materials in one place in your home rather than scattered in many areas.
    When you have finished with study materials, return them immediately to that designated place.
  • Before you go to bed at night, sort out the materials you need to take to school the next day and put them together.
  • Keep student organization materials in folders or notebooks separate from your course materials.
  • Keep materials for your part-time work in folders or notebooks separate from your course materials.
  • Keep the syllabus, case briefs, class notes, and handouts for a course together in a 3-ring binder.  Designate a separate 3-ring binder for each of your classes.
  • If color helps you organize, use different colored folders or binders for school courses, work, student organizations, etc.
  • Read your syllabus carefully; highlight due dates and transfer them immediately to your calendar.
  • Always date your class notes.
  • Have as many consistent abbreviations as possible to use in your notes and outlines for all classes.  For each new subject, decide on special abbreviations for that class to use in your notes and outlines and stay consistent.
  • If bold, italics, underlining, all capitals and/or font changes help you learn, use them consistently in your outlines.
  • Have a consistent system to indicate material that your professor emphasizes in class.  For example:  insert a star, underline the material, highlight the material in a different color, etc.
  • Have a consistent system to indicate material that you have questions about.  For example:  “Q”, “?”, red asterisk, red ink, etc.
  • If flow charts help you, use a large dry erase board for formulating a flow chart before you finalize it on paper or on your computer.
  • Regularly back-up your computer files on a thumb drive or CD.

Fee Increase for Criminal History Records for KY Bar Application

Please note that the Administrative Office of the Courts recently increased the fee to provide criminal history records from $10.00 to $15.00.  The $15.00 fee must be made payable to the "Kentucky State Treasurer" by check or money order.

KY Bar Application due February 1

Reminder:  If you are planning to sit for the July 2010 Kentucky Bar Exam, your application must be mailed by February 1 (postmark accepted), to avoid a $200 late fee.  Do not forget to have your application and the two authorization and release forms notarized.  Be sure to make a copy of your application before mailing the original. 

August 2009 Flood Collection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the morning of August 4, 2009, record-breaking rains fell in central Louisville and surrounding counties between 7 am and 10 am EDT, with reported hourly rainfall rates as high as 8.83 inches. The Louisville Free Public Library's main branch and the University of Louisville's Belknap and Health Sciences campuses were particularly hard hit by the deluge.

The University of Louisville Libraries recently launched the August 2009 Flood Collection. It's their first community-created collection containing digital videos and selected images, including some taken of the law library, and is devoted to documenting one of the worst floods in Louisville's history.

In an effort to preserve images recorded by community members during and after the flood, an archived community collection documenting the storm and its aftermath was created. In addition to preserving multimedia files donated by community members, the University of Louisville Libraries entered into a partnership with Archive-It to preserve web-based content relating to the flash flood.

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Time Management

Time is a commodity that most law students lament during law school.  However, there are some time management techniques that can really improve your control over your learning and your quality of life.  Here are some suggestions on how to make time your friend instead of your enemy.

  1. You should manage your time on three levels:  monthly, weekly and daily.  Each of these three levels complements the other two so that you work effectively and efficiently rather than haphazardly. 
  2. You can use paper templates to manage your monthly and weekly calendars or you can use Outlook or your own electronic templates.  In addition, you can use a paper “to do” list for daily management.  Monthly and weekly templates are posted on the Academic Success webpage http://www.law.louisville.edu/academics/academic-success.
  3. For weekly time management, here are the steps you should take:
  • You will get more out of your reading if you do not do it on the day before class or the day of class.  Instead, read for a class two days before you have class.  For example, read on Saturday for Monday; on Sunday for Tuesday; on Monday for Wednesday; etc.  This schedule allows you to read more carefully and to reflect on the material while reading; allows you time to review before class; and allows you to have Thursdays and Fridays for outlining, practice questions, time for papers or projects, review of your outlines, etc.
  • Put your commitments in first:  class attendance; structured study group sessions; work hours; study group times; sleep; meals; exercise; student organization meetings; non-law reward time, etc. 
  • Then, fill in your reading/briefing, review before class, review of class notes within 24 hours, outlining, practice questions, project time, review time.  If you overdid it on reward time, you will have to designate additional study time.  
  • For most law students, 40-45 hours per week outside of class throughout the entire semester will mean reviewing near exam time instead of learning it for the first time.  
  • Include some blocks of “flex” time in case an assignment takes longer than usual or you were ill and needed to alter your schedule as a result.  You then have additional times set aside when you can study and will not panic if you are surprised by an assignment or life event in a particular week. 
  • It will take 2-3 weeks to get a weekly schedule that feels comfortable and works consistently.  As you evaluate what worked and did not work each week, alter the schedule to make better use of your “alert” time and your ability to concentrate in blocks.  Include short breaks within longer blocks of studying so that you are able to focus and concentrate. 
  • The rewards for good time management are that your stress goes down, you are better prepared for studying for the bar, and you are better equipped as a new lawyer to manage a client load and work tasks.