Latest News

More Moot Court Success!

Congratulations to Ashley Duncan and Brittany Drucker who received Best Brief for Appellant at the 2008 National Animal Advocacy Competitions, held at Harvard on February 15-17, 2008. Duncan and Drucker's brief made a facial challenge to the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act and an as-applied challenge, arguing that defendant's actions were protected by the first amendment and not within the scope of the Act.

Professor Jennifer Hall acted as the team's advisor.

For more information about the competition, please visit the National Center for Animal Law's website.

To read the winning brief, please click here.

Samuel L. Greenebaum Award: Achievement in Legal Writing

This award is presented to the law student who demonstrates the highest degree of excellence and achievement in legal writing. Any written work, whether brief, article or memorandum, prepared during the preceding academic year shall be eligible for consideration. The award consists of a certificate, a cash award in the amount of $300, and recognition at the Awards program. 

Please provide legal writing submission to Rita Siegwald in Room 204 by Tuesday, March 18.

Brandeis Writing Award

The purpose of the Brandeis Writing Award is to promote Justice Brandeis' use of inter-disciplinary materials by recognizing high quality interdisciplinary writing among students at the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law.

The $100 award will be announced at the Senior Awards program, Friday, May 9, and be awarded to the senior who has produced the best interdisciplinary writing. This includes, but is not limited to, papers, law review articles (including notes and comments), briefs, and papers written specifically for this competition. No more than one prize shall be given each year. If it is necessary to give more than one award, because of collaboration or a tie, the prize shall be divided equally between or among the winners. If no work is worthy of the award, then no award shall be given.

Nomination is permitted by students, faculty, and others.

The deadline for submission of work is Tuesday, March 18. Please submit it to Rita Siegwald in Room 204.

American Inns of Court Competition

The Warren E. Burger Writing Competition is designed to encourage outstanding scholarship that "promotes the ideals of excellence, civility, ethics and professionalism within the legal profession," the core mission of the American Inns of Court. The American Inns of Court invites judges, lawyers, professors, students, scholars and other authors to participate in the competition by submitting an original, unpublished essay of 10,000 to 25,000 words on a topic of their choice addressing issues of legal excellence, civility, ethics and professionalism. 

The deadline for submission is June 15, 2008.

For details about the award, please visit the American Inns of Court's Warren E. Burger page.

For information or questions, please contact Cindy Dennis, American Inns of Court Awards & Scholarship Coordinator, at 800-233-3590 ext. 104 or cdennis@innsofcourt.org

Public Service Opportunity--Access to Justice Project

Help at risk elderly clients and contribute to a handbook that will be used by seniors and service providers across the state.

The Access to Justice Foundation and the Kentucky Bar Association Elder Law Committee are updating and re-writing a consumer handbook titled, "Laws and Programs for Older Kentuckians." The 4th edition of this book was published in 2001 by the Kentucky Bar Association.  For the 5th edition we need volunteers to do field research, edit, and write text. 

Topics available to work on include chapters on:
    Housing access for seniors
    Legal issues in medical care
    Selected issues in paying for medical care
    Elder abuse and domestic violence in later life
    Programs and resources for seniors

To help provide services to at risk seniors and to help the volunteers develop first hand understanding of the topic they are writing about volunteers will need to spend a day or more doing field work. This will involve working with elderly clients and service providers under the supervision of the project attorney for at least one day. Once this is completed the students will do additional research, write and edit a chapter or section for the book. Outlines and similar texts will be available as guides. Authors will be acknowledged in the final published text.

The Students will need to commit to one day in Lexington to complete the field work. The field work needs to be scheduled during normal business hours. Spring break would be a good opportunity to complete this part of the project. The rest of the research, writing and editing can be done at your convenience.  The minimum number of hours would be 5-10, the total number of hours is flexible and dependent on how much of the project you are willing to take on.  Up to 5 students are needed for this project.

The project will also need a final editor, but the text will likely not be available for editing until mid to late summer. Contact DavidGodfrey (see below) if you have experience editing text and are interested in this project.

Before signing up for this project, please contact: David Godfrey, managing attorney, Access to Justice Foundation 859-255-9913 ext 12 or dgodfrey@mis.net  to commit to a date for the field work and to determine the section you are interested in working on.

American Judges Association Essay Contest

The American Judges Association is sponsoring an essay contest on the topic, "Search and Seizure Arising From Motor Vehicle Stops," with prizes of $3,000, $1,500 and $1,000. The deadline for submission is June 2, 2008, and the length is 10-25 pages.

For more information go to the organization's website: http://aja.ncsc.dni.us/index.html and select  the link "Essay Contest."

What's Happening with Rooms 115, 117 and 119?

Over the last several days room 115 (the Academic Support office and 1L study aids library) and 119 (student mailboxes and other communications) have gotten new rugs and 117 (upper class study aids library and study area) was closed because it was used to store confidential materials from 115. We were lucky that the University was able to provide us with these badly needed new rugs for free despite the budget crunch. Rooms 117 and 119 are now back in operation and set up as they were prior to the disruption. Room 115 still needs to have the computer and phone hooked up and will have a new look when it opens.

I am also in the process of sorting through the various 1L study aids and eliminating obsolete ones. (Many thanks to the faculty, students and alums who have contributed to the collection over the years!) For example, I am taking the audio cassette sets off the shelves as I don't believe anyone can use them anymore. I will resume office hours in 115 next Monday, but, as always, my door is almost always open to room 216 and I can address matters involving Academic Support or Student Affairs from either venue. I apologize for any inconvenience this has caused.

-Dean Sealing

Classes and Offices Delayed Again, Wednesday, Feb. 13

Classes and offices at the University of Louisville are on a delayed schedule starting at 10 a.m. today, Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2008.

For the School of Law, the following schedule will be in effect:

9:00 classes begin at 10 and end at 10:40

10:25 classes begin at 10:50 and end at the usual time

Afternoon classes remain the same. If evening classes are canceled, this pertains only to classes that meet at 5 p.m. or later.

Psychiatry, Mental Health and Law canceled tonight

Jennifer Leibson's Mental Health Law class will not be held tonight, Tuesday, Feb. 12.

Louisville Law Negotiation Team Wins the Nationals Competition!

Congratulations to our Negotiations Team, which won the national competition held February 8-9 in Los Angeles, Calif. The team has been invited to attend the international competition in London, England, in July as the United States representative. This is the negotiation team's best result in school history.

The ABA Law Student Division's Negotiation Team Competition is designed to promote greater interest among law students in legal negotiation and provides a means for them to practice and improve their negotiating skills. The competition simulates legal negotiations in which law students, acting as lawyers, negotiate a series of legal problems.

The students who represented the law school at this competition are Scott Powell and David Scott, both 3Ls. Michelle Grant Rudovich and Mary Jo Gleason are the co-coaches.

David Scott (left) Scott Powell (right