Latest News

Susan Duncan Appointed To Three Year Term as Dean

Provost Shirley Willihnganz announced on May 8 that Susan Duncan would be appointed for an additional three years term as Interim Dean.  During the previous two years in which Susan Duncan has served in that role, she has accomplished a great deal and this continued appointment provides the opportunity to continue to place the Brandeis School of Law in a strong position.  Her accomplishments are in the areas of fundraising, connections with alumni/ae, physical plant updates, attention to diversity, staff support, and developing a strategic plan.  Dean Duncan joined the law school faculty in 1999 and is a 1991 graduate of the law school herself.  In accepting the appointment, Dean Duncan stated that, “Serving as the dean for the past two years has been an honor and a privilege.  I thank the President, the Provost, and the law school faculty and staff for their faith in me and look forward to working with all of them on advancing our school.  The strategic plan sets forth a vision that is very exciting.  I know our alumni and friends will help us execute this plan allowing our school to reach new heights.”

Click here to read the full story. 

LAST DAY TO ADD A CLASS AND THE LAST DAY TO RECEIVE 100% REFUND

Thursday, May 15 is the last day to add a summer class.

 

REFUND DATES

May 15   -  Last day to receive 100% refund

May 22   -  Last day to receive  50% refund

May 28   -  Last day to receive  25% refund

 

June 11 is the last day to withdraw from a summer class.

 

 

$500 KBA Bar Study Scholarships

The Kentucky Bar Association will once again award up to four $500.00 scholarships for students taking the July 2014 Kentucky bar examination.  The scholarships are used to defray the expenses associated with studying for and taking the bar examination.  Awards will be made to exemplary candidates who 1) have made a significant contribution to the law school community; 2) have a demonstrated need for financial assistance; and 3) intend to practice in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  To apply, please send a one-page letter addressing the criteria for the award along with a current resume to Carl Frazier at Carl.Frazier@skofirm.com.  All submissions must be received by Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. EDT.  Scholarship winners will be announced and funds will be disbursed approximately one week after the submission deadline.

Law Library Summer Schedule

The Law Library has returned to its summer schedule. It will be open until 9PM Sunday through Thursday and will close at 6PM on most Friday's and Saturday's.

BLSA Convocation

Graduates pictured from left to right are Aaron Marcus, Zackary McKee, Donovan Porter, BLSA President Miranda Ratcliffe, Kiera Hollis, Stephany Hunter, and Gayle Johnson.  Also pictured are current BLSA members Whitney Railey and Iman Jackson. 

Professor Cedric Merlin Powell was the invited speaker for the 2014 Black Law Student Association Convocation honoring the six BLSA members who are graduating this year.  Miranda Ratcliffe (Class of 2015), current BLSA President, introduced Professor Powell.  Others who spoke to the graduates were Dean Susan Duncan and Louisville Black Lawyers Association President Lonita Baker.  Ms. Ratcliffe then recognized the graduates who each spoke about their experiences and thanked those who had made it possible. 

Click here to read Professor Cedric Merlin Powell's remarks, "BLSA Convocation: The Lawyer In a Changing World." 

 

Professor Abrams Invited As Gender and Law Blog Guestblogger

Professor Abrams will be contributing to the Gender and the Law Blog this month, drawing upon her expertise in the field. Her scholarly interests include integrating masculinities theory in feminist law reforms such as military integration and domestic violence; examining the tort complexities governing standards of care in childbirth; gendered conceptualizations of citizenship; and legal education pedagogy. She has a forthcoming book chapter on Migrating and Mutating Masculinities in Institutional Law Reforms in Masculinities and Law (Ashgate Press, Martha A. Fineman & Michael Thomson eds., forthcoming 2014). Her article Distorted and Diminished Tort Claims for Women was published in the June 2013 volume of the Cardoza Law Review. Her most recent work, Exposing Alarming Standards of Care in the Treatment of Pregnant Women, is forthcoming in the Florida State Law Review this Fall. She is a frequent presenter at conferences that address issues relating to reproductive justice, tort law and feminism, feminist theory, masculinities theory, and legal education pedagogy. Scholars around the country recognize her expertise. She has signed on to nationally relevant amici briefs, including the Perry v. Hollingsworth same sex marriage case before the United States Supreme Court and a Kentucky Supreme Court case considering the proper role of counsel for children in child custody cases. She is co-editor of a project seeking to re-write United States Supreme Court cases from a feminist perspective based on the earlier Feminist Judgments project in the United Kingdom.

2014 Law School Graduate Named UofL Top Scholar

Josh Hartsell, a May 2014 graduate has been selected as a finalist to the Presidential Management Fellows Class of 2014. A total of 609 students (518 individuals were selected as PMF Finalists and 91 individuals were selected PMF STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Finalists) were selected. The PMF Program received approximately 7,000 applicants for the 2014 application cycle. Mr. Hartsell will spend the next two years working in Washington, D.C. on international trade policy as part of a leadership development program.

Student Mailboxes - Please Check Before You Leave for the Summer

Students, especially graduating seniors:

Please do not forget to check your student mailboxes in the basement.  Take what you need, recycle what you don't need.  Clean it out.  Thank you!

Who Rules Louisville? A Three week intensive Course on the City May 12 to June 2

Who rules Louisville?  Who wants to turn Louisville into a wasteland that is starting to look like the next Detroit in Smoketown and West Louisville?   What kind of policies work that create urban regeneration in places like Old Louisville, East Russell, Norton Commons and NuLu?   What can we learn from the economic success stories of Portland (Oregon), Amsterdam and Australia?   Who and where is the command and control center of Louisville?

We are bringing in the power brokers of Louisville from the rich to the poor, the fourth estate, developers and environmentalists; and many world class urban thinkers.

We are inviting speakers for our Introduction to the City class May 12 to June 2:

Congressman John Yarmuth;  Mayor Greg Fischer, Metro Councilmembers David James and Tom Owen, Tom Fitzgerald, Kentucky Resources Council, Dr. Julian Ageyman Editor of Local Environments and Professor at Tufts; Wendell Berry, Kentucky book author; Greg Squires George Washington University; Marilyn Melkonian developer of 12,000 affordable houses in 22 cities; Courier Journal Editorial Board members; LEO editors and Louisvilleky.com; Wesley Meares, Georgia Regents University;  Larry Gough, green developer;  Ricky Jones, Chair Pan African Studies; Cathy Hinko, Director of Metro Housing Council;  environmental justice field trip with Russ Barnet, Director of KIESD;  field trip to Norton Commons as a new urbanist development;   field trip to NuLu to meet with developer and green visionary Gill Holland;  Jackie Green, Mayoral candidate;  philanthropists such as Edie Bingham and Christy Brown; all are invited to come to our table for peaceful discussion and debate in room 117!  We are also teaming up with the Festival of Faiths to attend a few sessions with Julian Ageyman and Wendell Berry and many others we will get you involved in: 

http://www.centerforinterfaithrelations.org/sacred-earth-sacred-self/

Most of these speakers have already been confirmed and some are still trying to fit it into their schedule.

We are still verifying dates and times but we should have a confirmed schedule as we move to the end of the week.    We will be reading reports produced by the city. 

Fine Print:

Introduction to the City:  Public Administration, Planning and  Policy.   session 1: three week session in May

first day- May 12--last day- June 2

5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.--with class consent some class times  can be adjusted to better fit student  schedules

Session 1 (May 12- June 2, 3 week)

Special Topics: The City: Public Admin, Policy, & Planning

UPA680-01/PLAN680-01/PADM683-01   /  credit hours: 3

no pre-requisites required, open to all UofL graduates students, advanced undergraduates by permission of instructor. 

John I. Gilderbloom is a Professor of  Planning  at UofL which is ranked as one of the best academic programs  in the nation.  Dr. Gilderbloom currently directs the multi-million dollar  Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods (http://sun.louisville.edu). Dr. Gilderbloom  has been honored with numerous awards  including the Presidential Medal for Distinguished Faculty Research at the University of Louisville.    In an international poll of thousands of Urbanist, planners and architects, Professor Gilderbloom was ranked one of the “top 100 urban thinkers in the world."  He enjoys singing in the shower, writing and surfing. 

Why?

Why do people in West Louisville / Portland have shorten lives by up to ten years on average?

Why does Louisville rank as having some of the worst air, water and soil toxins  of any city in the nation?

Why is climate change our most pressing problem we face as a civilization?

Why can't Louisville come up with policy and planning solutions to end these problems?

What cities provide models that create prosperity, fairness, green living and reduces catastrophic climate change?

"Introduction to the City " is a three week intensive course taught from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. to  give a comprehensive  overview of the city by looking closely at Louisville's political, planning and policy outcomes of decision making.  Half the class is taught outside the classroom with field trips.  We will spend  time touring the city (walking, biking and bus) and learning about struggling and prosperous neighborhoods.   My  approach is to study the players who shape the city:  elected leaders, government, developers, non-profits, news media,  and citizen groups. Our city shapes our life chances but we shape our city: it a dialectic.   We will meet with elected officials from our Congressman, Senator, Mayor, Councilmembers, Neighborhood Associations, and non-profits such as Leadership Louisville and Louisville Central Community Center. This class will attempt to understand the root causes of our problems and come up policy prescriptions that work; we will look at bad examples from Havana to Detroit and good examples from Portland to Amsterdam. We will show you how my urbanist colleagues can access a treasure trove  of data from Photo Archives, MLS, Deed records, PVA office, Kentucky State Data Center, Planning Department, Health, and Economic Development.  Graduate students from Sociology, Geography, Political Science, Planning, History, Art History, Law, Public Health, Women's Studies, Pan African Studies, and Public Administration are welcomed  to take this course.    We will provide room for advanced  undergraduates.     If you have any questions, please contact Dr. John Gilderbloom at jigild01@louisville.edu or call him at 502-852-8557.

Readers and Writers Unite at the Kentucky Women’s Book Festival

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival endeavors to foster a deeper interest in Kentucky women writers and encourage beginning writers to continue their work and strive to grow with each new venture.  Kentucky writers include those born in Kentucky but now living elsewhere, if they wish to be identified as Kentuckians, as well as those who, although not born here have made Kentucky home.

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival is held on the 3rd Saturday of May. This year it marks the 8th annual festival and will be on May 17, 2014 in the Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville. The event is free and open to all. If you would like to purchase a lunch, please call the Women’s Center  by May 13 (502) 852-8976 by May 13. (The lunch is $16 and catered by Masterson’s. Those who do not wish to purchase a lunch may still come to the reading.)

Doors open at 9:00 with refreshments and discussion, then the speakers begin in the Elaine Chao Auditorium at 9:30 with George Ella Lyon who will  discuss and read from her new book of poetry: Many-Storied House, followed by Bobbie Ann Mason who will read from her latest novel: The Girl in the Blue Beret. There are three consecutive morning sessions: Sonja de Vries, a poet; Alison Atlee, an author; and Jannene Winstead & Leborah Goodwin who have compiled a cookbook with a bit of Louisville history: Recipes and recollections: from the houses Samuel M. Plato Built. Holly Goddard Jones will do a lunchtime reading from her novel The Next Time You See Me. After lunch is a presentation by Sena Jeter Naslund entitled “Knowing the Self Through Knowing the Other,” which will feature the research for her latest novel The Fountain of St. James Court; or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman, then two more consecutive sessions: Mariam Williams will discuss “Black Arts Movement Pride, Walker’s Womanism and Hillbilly Sisterhood: the African American Women’s Literary Series in the 1990s” and Playwrights Nancy Gall-Clayton & Kathi E. B. Wlllis will present “When Characters Speak.”

Book purchase and signing will be available throughout the day. For more information, see the KWBF website or read about it in the Women’s Center’s spring 2014 newsletter. The festival ends at 3:30.

Source: UofL Libraries Blog