Library News

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 4

Law Library Faculty & Staff Honored

On May 19, faculty members were recognized for their service to the University of Louisville with an awards ceremony at the University Club. Public Services Librarian, Robin Harris, was honored for 30 years of service and  Law Library Director, David Ensign, was honored for 25 years of service.  

Full Story: "Faculty Service Awards add up to more than 1,700 years of service" (UofL Today, May 27, 2014)

In other news, Library Assistant, Marcus Walker, recently received a Masters in Library Science from the University of Kentucky and Circulation Assistant, Jerome Neukirch, was named the law school's Employee of the Month for April 2014.

 

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 3

The latest issue of our SSRN Research Paper series features publications from Professors Campbell, Lebron, Sweeny and Weaver.

 More information about the RPS:

Law Library Summer Schedule

The Law Library has returned to its summer schedule. It will be open until 9PM Sunday through Thursday and will close at 6PM on most Friday's and Saturday's.

Readers and Writers Unite at the Kentucky Women’s Book Festival

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival endeavors to foster a deeper interest in Kentucky women writers and encourage beginning writers to continue their work and strive to grow with each new venture.  Kentucky writers include those born in Kentucky but now living elsewhere, if they wish to be identified as Kentuckians, as well as those who, although not born here have made Kentucky home.

The Kentucky Women’s Book Festival is held on the 3rd Saturday of May. This year it marks the 8th annual festival and will be on May 17, 2014 in the Ekstrom Library, University of Louisville. The event is free and open to all. If you would like to purchase a lunch, please call the Women’s Center  by May 13 (502) 852-8976 by May 13. (The lunch is $16 and catered by Masterson’s. Those who do not wish to purchase a lunch may still come to the reading.)

Doors open at 9:00 with refreshments and discussion, then the speakers begin in the Elaine Chao Auditorium at 9:30 with George Ella Lyon who will  discuss and read from her new book of poetry: Many-Storied House, followed by Bobbie Ann Mason who will read from her latest novel: The Girl in the Blue Beret. There are three consecutive morning sessions: Sonja de Vries, a poet; Alison Atlee, an author; and Jannene Winstead & Leborah Goodwin who have compiled a cookbook with a bit of Louisville history: Recipes and recollections: from the houses Samuel M. Plato Built. Holly Goddard Jones will do a lunchtime reading from her novel The Next Time You See Me. After lunch is a presentation by Sena Jeter Naslund entitled “Knowing the Self Through Knowing the Other,” which will feature the research for her latest novel The Fountain of St. James Court; or Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman, then two more consecutive sessions: Mariam Williams will discuss “Black Arts Movement Pride, Walker’s Womanism and Hillbilly Sisterhood: the African American Women’s Literary Series in the 1990s” and Playwrights Nancy Gall-Clayton & Kathi E. B. Wlllis will present “When Characters Speak.”

Book purchase and signing will be available throughout the day. For more information, see the KWBF website or read about it in the Women’s Center’s spring 2014 newsletter. The festival ends at 3:30.

Source: UofL Libraries Blog

Employee Spotlight: Michael Atkinson

Welcome to the first installment of the law library's Employee Spotlight series, which we're sure will become as wildly popular as Stephen Colbert's Better Know a District.

First up is "Fightin' 3L" Michael Atkinson who has been a student worker since his second semester of law school. While serving as the SBA's Historian and earning Top Grades in three classes, he also managed to perform 365 hours of public service, which earned him the  Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Award and solidified his super hero law student status.

What’s your hometown?

Jeffersonville, Indiana

Where did you complete your undergraduate degree and what was your major?
Indiana University Southeast, and I majored in Political Science and International Studies.

What led you to law school and what do you plan to do with your law degree?
At IUS I took a class in Constitutional Rights and Liberties, focusing primarily on the First Amendment. I very much enjoyed discussing constitutional issues, and so decided to go to law school to continue that discussion. After law school I plan work in a field relating to legal research and writing, and eventually pursuing a Master of Library Science degree, as I am interested in becoming a law librarian someday.

What do you enjoy about working in the law library?
The books, for one. Especially when I get to shelve the Supreme Court briefs in the attic with all the other historical volumes. At times I have to remind myself I'm supposed to be shelving the books and not reading them.

What’s your favorite book?
It's very hard to pick just one, but one of my favorites is The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. I particularly enjoyed his sense of wit and random hilarity. My other favorites include The Lord of the Rings trilogy, David Copperfield, The Remarkable Journey of Prince Jen by Lloyd Alexander, and The Pushcart War by Jean F. Merrill.

Do you have a favorite quote?
"Everybody was a baby once, Arthur. Oh, sure, maybe not today, or even yesterday. But once. Babies, chum: tiny, dimpled, fleshy mirrors of our us-ness, that we parents hurl into the future, like leathery footballs of hope. And you've got to get a good spiral on that baby, or evil will make an interception!" ~The Tick.

If you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would that be?
Assuming we're referring to real people and not fictional, I would very much like to have a conversation with the aforementioned Douglas Adams and J.R.R. Tolkien. I would also invite Rowan Atkinson (aka Mr. Bean) , Patrick Stewart, and Jennifer Lawrence.   

Is there anything else you’d like to share?
I have a *blog, hypotheticallywriting.wordpress.com, where I write stories featuring random characters (like the heroic superhero Captain Happily Married) dealing with events such as zombie penguin apocalypses. I've also written a short story and several novels, which I self-published through Amazon.

*Editor's Note: In addition to his fictional short-stories, Michael has also journaled about his Law School Adventures.

 

Library Student Workers Honored

Three of the law library's student workers were honored at the recent Honors and Awards Program. Kudos to Michael Atkinson (pictured left with Dean Duncan), Alex Russell (pictured second from right), and Bailey Schrupp!

  • Michael Atkinson, 3L: Top Grades During 2013 (Constitutional Law II, Copyright, Legal History), Brandeis Honor Society, Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Award (he performed 365 hours of public service at five different public service placements), University of Louisville Law Review (Member), Student Bar Association (Historian) and the Honor Council
  • Alex Russell, 2L: Edwin H. Perry Mediation Fellow, American Bar Association Negotiation Competition (Team Member), Journal of Law and Education (Member)
  • Bailey Schrupp, 2L: Journal of Animal and Environmental Law (Member), American Bar Association Arbitration Competition (Facilitator)

SSRN Legal Studies Research Paper Series, Vol 8, No 2

Women & the Law is the theme for the latest issue of our SSRN Research Paper series, which features publications from Professors Abrams, Fischer, Jordan, and Rothstein.

    More information about the RPS:

    Winter Bar Publications

    The March 2014 issue of Louisville magazine features its annual "Top Lawyers" report. Several of the law school's graduates are listed among the honorees, beginning on page 60. Among those profiled include land use and zoning specialist Deborah A. Bilitski, '95 (page 61), criminal defense attorney Scott C. Cox, '85 (page 64), and social security and disability law attorney Alvin D. Wax, '71 (page 72). 2013 Alumni Fellow, Stephen Porter, is also profiled in "Counsel for Yesteryear" on page 55.

    Here are some more highlights:

    • "What is your favorite courtroom movie?" (page 8)
    • "Thomson Smillie 1942-2014" by Keith L. Runyon, '82 (page 109)

    Tax & Finance Law is the theme of the March 2014 Bar Briefs issue.

    Here are some highlights:

    • "UofL Highlights the Importance of Tax and Finance Law" by Dean Susan Duncan (page 6)
    • "Historically High Estate Tax Exemption Shifts Attention Toward Income Taxes" by Nicholas A. Volk, '09 (page 7)
    • "Crisscross Law: Tax & Finance" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 15)
    • "Requirements for Disinterment by Private Landowners" by Marlow P. Riedling, '11 (page 20)
    • "Members on the move" (page 23)

    Civil rights and diversity are the theme of the February 2014 Bar Briefs issue.

    Here are some highlights:

    • "Diversity Among Top Priorities at Brandeis" by Dean Susan Duncan (page 6)
    • "Bench & Bar Social" photo gallery (page 12)
    • "This Year's Honorees" (page 14)
    • "Crisscross Law" by Sabine Kudmani Stovall, '09 (page 21)
    • "Members on the move" (page 23)

    Legal Issues for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Community is the theme of the January 2014 issue of Bench & Bar. The law school's column mentions Professors Laura Rothstein, Jamie Abrams, Sam Marcosson and how they're exploring LGBT issues in their curriculum. Greg Justis, 3L, is also cited for his paper, "Defining Union: The Defense of Marriage Act, Tribal Sovereignty and Same-Sex Marriage".

    Several Louisville alums are featured in "Who, What, When & Where" on page 43 and Thomas E. Schweitz's, '90, bio appears "In Memoriam" on page 52.

    Each publication is available in the law library.

    Reflections of The Mighty Walk

    Stephen T. Porter's picture

    In "The Mighty Walk" (Liberty Magazine, May/June 2013), 2013 Alumni Fellow, Stephen T. Porter, '68, reflects upon the  events that led to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s visit to the law school on March 30, 1967.

    While on a break from classes at Duke University, he joined thousands of protesters at that monumentous rally in Montgomery, Alabama on March 25, 1965. It was there that he bonded with six young African-American college students who gathered together to hear the great orator speak. Just two years later, the legendary civil rights leader accepted the invitation of Mr. Porter and his classmates to speak at the law school.

    The march into the city was on streets lined by locals taunting and cursing with racial epithets, but the crowd of marchers dominated the city that day and made its presence felt not only to the local populace and state leaders but also to the nation as a whole. The national press decided to cover this whole event (some claimed it was only because a White minister had been killed). More than 25,000 marchers heard the speakers ask for the right to vote for all citizens of Alabama. Best known of those speeches was certainly the one by Martin Luther King, sometimes referred to as the “How Long, Not Long” or the “Our God Is Marching On” speech.

    Visit Liberty Magazine to read the full story.

    The public is invited to view several of the rare photos included in the story at a free event on Friday, February 28 to celebrate Black History Month. The Martin Luther King Jr. Photo Dedication & Graduates of Color Reunion will begin at 5:30 PM in the Allen Courtroom.

    Law Librarian, Robin Harris, was recently interviewed about the special collection by WFPL News in their report, "University of Louisville to Unveil Never-Before Seen Martin Luther King Jr. Photos". She also participated in a video produced by UofL's Office of Communications & Media, "UofL Remembers MLK visit", that includes testimonials of students who were in attendance on that historic day.