Staff News

Lawlaplooza Tickets, T-shirts and More

Tickets and t-shirts are on sale now in the Law Resource Center (room 272, across from 275).

Tickets cost $5 for students (including spouses, partners, boyfriends, girlfriends, etc.) and $20 for general admission. They’ll also be available at the door.

T-shirts are $10. BONUS: Students who purchase a t-shirt and wear it to the show will also receive their first drink free, compliments of Westlaw!

We hope to see you at Lawlapalooza 2010 on September 30th for an evening of great music and great fun for a great cause, and be sure to bring plenty of cash to vote for your favorite band!

What Is Lawlapalooza?

Lawlapalooza is a full-on, no-holds-barred, Texas-steel-cage, loser-leave-town Battle of the Bands featuring Louisville attorneys (and occasionally law students), rocking out to raise money for a great cause. Proceeds from Lawlapalooza benefit the Judge Ellen B. Ewing Foundation, which provides local summer fellowships for University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law students to work in the areas of family law, domestic violence and spouse abuse, and HIV/AIDS. Ewing Fellowships are awarded under the Samuel L. Greenebaum Public Service Program.

Lawlapalooza began in 2005 in collaboration with the Jefferson County Women Lawyers Association, and to date has raised over $25,000 and provided invaluable practice experience for four Ewing Fellows.

Lawlapalooza 2010 will be held Thursday, September 30th at the Phoenix Hill Tavern, 644 Baxter Avenue. Doors open at 6:00 PM, and the first band takes the stage at 6:30. Both new and returning bands will perform, featuring attorneys from:

  • Greenebaum Doll McDonald
  • Stoll Keenon Ogden
  • Borowitz & Goldsmith
  • Fultz Maddox Hovious & Dickens
  • Clay Frederick Adams, and
  • Brandeis School of Law*
*Professors Tim Hall and Lars Smith and Assistant Dean Jim Becker will be performing, along with Professor Hall’s wife, Stephanie, as The Subconscionables.

The bands’ musical styles this year range from “funky bluegrass” to country to rock and blues, and each will perform a 20-minute set. Fans vote for their favorite band by throwing money in their tip jar. The band with the most money in its jar at the end of the night wins a trophy and bragging rights until next year.

This year, Lawlapalooza will be hosted by law students Alex White and Jennifer Siewertsen, our 2010 Ewing Fellow, who spent her summer working in the Legal Aid Society of Louisville’s Family Law Unit.

Tickets, T-shirts and More

Tickets and t-shirts are on sale now in the Law Resource Center (room 272, across from 275).

Tickets cost $5 for students (including spouses, partners, boyfriends, girlfriends, etc.) and $20 for general admission. They’ll also be available at the door.

T-shirts are $10 and will also be on sale Tuesday, September 21, from 5:15-7:15 PM, and Wednesday, September 22nd, from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM, in the Mosaic Lobby. Available sizes now are L and XL, but we’ve ordered more and expect to have S, M and 2XL by the end of this week.

BONUS: Students who purchase a t-shirt and wear it to the show will also receive their first drink free, compliments of Westlaw!

We hope to see you at Lawlapalooza 2010 on September 30th for an evening of great music and great fun for a great cause, and be sure to bring plenty of cash to vote for your favorite band!

Constitution Day Commemoration


Barry Faulkner, The Constitution
We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

United States Constitution, preamble



[W]e must never forget that it is a constitution we are expounding.

McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 316, 407 (1819)



Constitution

The United States Constitution is not only the basic law of the United States. It has also inspired politicians, philosophers, and ordinary people around the world. Scholars have devoted intense attention to the Constitution, its interpretation by the Supreme Court of the United States, and its impact on the American people.

Constitutional law forms an important part of the Law School's curriculum and research agenda. University of Louisville faculty members have devoted considerable attention to the Constitution, its interpretation, and its social meaning. Lawyers with diverse practices and specializations share a background in constitutional law, which in turn unites the practicing bar in a common civil culture based on the Constitution and its role in American history and politics.

The Law School therefore takes great pride in presenting an annual commemoration of Constitution Day on behalf of the entire University of Louisville. This year's program consists of a collection of videos that provide commentary on recent developments in the Supreme Court of the United States and in lower federal courts. Jim Chen, Samuel Marcosson, Luke Milligan, Laura Rothstein and Joseph Tomain review a significant year of developments in American constitutional law.

2010 Constitution Day Program

  • Luke M. Milligan, Introduction
  • Jim Chen, McDonald v. City of Chicago: The States and the 2nd Amendment
  • Samuel A. Marcosson, The California Same-Sex Marriage Case
  • Luke M. Milligan, City of Ontario v. Quon
  • Laura Rothstein, Christian Legal Society v. Martinez
  • Joseph A. Tomain, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission

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Additional resources:


Legal notice: This page is composed in compliance with section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2004, Pub. L. No. 108-447, § 111, 118 Stat. 2809, 3344-45 (2004), more colloquially known as the "Constitution Day" statute. See also Notice of Implementation of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on September 17 of Each Year, 70 Fed. Reg. 29,727 (May 24, 2005).

Section 111 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act states in relevant part: "Each educational institution that receives Federal funds for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on September 17 of such year for the students served by the educational institution." Section 111 further requires that Constitution Day be commemorated on September 17, in honor of the day in 1787 on which the Constitution was signed. In a year in which September 17 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, Constitution Day may be commemorated during the preceding or following week.

Thursday! Thursday! Thursday!

Lawlapalooza 2010 t-shirts and tickets will be on sale in the Mosaic Lobby ...

  • Thursday, September 16 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm,
  • Tuesday, September 21 from 5:15 to 7:15 pm, and
  • Wednesday, September 22 from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm.

T-shirts are $10. Student tickets are $5, and general admission tickets are $20.

Bonus: Every student who wears his/her Lawlapalaooza 2010 t-shirt to the show, Thursday, September 30 at the Phoenix Hill Tavern, gets his/her first drink FREE, compliments of Westlaw.

Enjoy the Lawlapalooza 2010 Commercial:

Profile of Ellen B. Ewing Fellow

Jennifer Siewertsen, 2L, shares her experience as the 2010 Ellen B. Ewing Fellow.

As a first year law student the law seemed like an intangible idea, an abstract thought presented in casebooks and lectures. The cases and the discussions have names and titles, but not faces or stories. For someone propelled into law with a background in social justice and advocacy, this pursuit of a faceless justice left a lot to be desired. I never imagined that in ten short weeks, my purpose and interest in the law would be renewed and redirected towards family law.

As the 2010 Ellen Ewing Fellow I was thrust headfirst into Legal Aid’s Family Law Unit. Working with a small and dedicated group of people, I worked with a variety of complex family and legal issues. I immediately began meeting clients and sifting through cases. What I found wasn’t a question presented or an issue, but individual people struggling to find safety for themselves and their children from domestic abuse. What may have been another day at the office for me was often a life-changing moment in the life of a client.

I spent the summer doing many of the same duties as any other law clerk, researching, writing, and observing in court. However, what I got out of the experience was wholly unique. The opportunity to interact with clients on a personal level and see legal issues through a human lens has given me a renewed sense of purpose for this upcoming school year. Though my time spent with the Legal Aid Society as the Ellen Ewing fellow was brief, the impact of that experience will be life-long.

Ms. Siewertsen is a native of Louisville, Kentucky and a 2008 Graduate of Centre College with a Bachelor’s in Religion as well as Government. She's active on the 2010 National Moot Court Team and the Moot Court Board as well as a candidate for membership in the Journal of Law and Education. She was a runner-up in the 2010 First Year Appellate Advocacy Competition (pictured above).

Jennifer and her classmate, Alex White, will emcee Lawalapalooza on September 30 at Phoenix Hill Tavern.


 

Helping In and Out of the Courtroom

Whether it's by helping Habitat for Humanity or caring for people at the Ronald McDonald House, law school students show they can help in more places than the courtroom. Before they started classes, they went out to give back to the community where they live and to get to know it a little better.

Watch the video!

Source: UofL Today, August 26, 2010

3rd Annual Community Service Day Is a Success!

On August 13, 126 first-year law students participated in the community service day component of orientation.  That equates to 90% participation (126/140)!  They were joined by 10 upper-division law students, 7 staff members, and 8 faculty members.


Photos from the Habitat for Humanity and Family Scholar House projects were prominently featured on UofL's homepage last week. Additionally, a nice article about the New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter project was published in the August 14 issue of The Tribune.

Many thanks to our volunteers!

Catholic Charities: Andrew Beckman, Linh Biscan, Nick Caprino, Ashley Haile, Paige Hamby, Matthew Little, Luke Markushewski,  Sean O'Tormey, John Slayton, Patrick Smith, Audrey Villon, Becky Wenning (Law Resource Center), Kristie Wetterer (2L), Krista Willike

Dare to Care Food Bank: Zach Berry, John Brooks, Elizabeth Fitzpatrick (2L), Bradley Hall, Matthew Kinney, Michael Marks, Laurie Beth McTighe, Angela Nolden, Caroline Ramsey, Brian Smith, Sara Thompson, Josh Waldrop, Sydney Wilson, Becky Wimberg (Assistant to the Dean)

Family Scholar House: Phillip Burrell, Quintin Diggs, Andrea Fagan (3L), Larry Forman, Rebekah Gray, Jimmy Kaufman, Matthew Kaufman, Doug Keil, Professor Ariana Levinson, Yuan Lin, TaKeisha Mink, Thom Stevens (2L), Brian Strunk, Tracy Tan, Ashley Wiggins (SBA Vice President)

Habitat for Humanity: Jim Becker (Dean of Information Technology), Paul Bradford, Jackie Clowers (2L), Willa Fuqua, Vincent Gonzalez, Matthew Johnson, John Jones, Nick Laughlin, Chris Moncrief, Joesph Pierson, Michael Profumo,  Dorothy Rush, Donna Tooill

Historic Locust Grove: Matthew Doran, Jack Hartz, Andrew Lay, Thomas Lutes, Joseph McMahan, Andrew Miller, Marcie Norsworthy, Professor Richard Nowka, Ryan Steirs, Melissa Weinstein, Mackenzie Wallace, Joshua Wong

Hosparus of Louisville: Mara Biliter, Taylor Cooper, Professor Susan Duncan, Jacob Fiesecke, Charles Johnson, Professor David Leibson, Alice Lyon, Kayla Means, Ronald Morton, Jenn Murzyn (3L), Edward O'Brien, Kaitllyn Potzick, Kevin Pride, Scott Redding, Debra Reh (Career Services), Professor Shelley Santry, Amanda Smith, Kathy Urbach (Dean of Career & Public Services), Kyle Winham

Kentucky Refugee Ministries: Professor Kathy Bean, Sabrina Clayton-Stubblefield, Cassandra Kennedy, John LaFollette, Patrick Stubblefield

Masonic Homes: Katie Bennett (2L), Darick Crumbly, Dana Eberle-Dethy, Denise Hall, Trey Jenkins, Jennie Lynch, Victoria O'Grady, Whitney Roth, Professor Laura Rothstein, Jillian Smith,  Stefanie Stolz, Amanda Warford (2L), April Wimberg

New Albany-Floyd County Animal Shelter: Kimberly Ballard (Dean of Academic Success), Samantha Constantine, Jacob Ford, Emma Franklin, Josh Hartsell, Mary Lu Jessee, Elizabeth Johnson, Gregory Justis, Clay Kennedy, Danielle Yannelli

Operation Brightside: Catherine Barnes (2L), John Brown, Michael Buff, Ryan Driskill, Jennifer Ewa, Ryan Fenwick, Richard Hinton, John Johanboeke, Brandon Johnson, Professor Karen Jordan, Erin Kimla, Virginia Mattingly (librarian), Brian O'Connor, Alston Peek, Jonathan Raymon, Zachary Richards, Lauren Robinson, Ahmed Safeelah, Barney Sutley, Sharon Wright

Ronald McDonald House: Carli Ashe, Carly Baize, Angela Beverly (Admissions), Stephanie Carr, Lauren Claycomb, Sarah Gritton, Courtney McGrew, Luschka Montijo, Andrew Noland, Andrew Phelps

St. Vincent de Paul: Sarah Christianson, Brittany Deskins, Brittany Hampton, Jamie Jackson, Tyler Korus, Chris Rogers (3L), Leah Rupp, Samantha Thomas-Bush (SBA Service Chair), Ashley Trosper

Volunteers' Testimonials

I had a great group of students who went with me to the Ronald McDonald House.  We did chores for the residents living there and we also baked cupcakes and cookies for them as well.  We made pig and monkey cupcakes and reeses pieces cookies.  We did get to talk with one resident at the facility.  She told us her story.  She was staying at the RMH because her 21 year old son went into cardiac arrest and was in a diabetic coma.  He had been in hospice for a week and on that day, they were expecting that he would pass on.  It was heart wrenching to hear a story like that, but so fulfilling to know that we were there doing good works.  I gave her a hug and told her I would pray for her.  Since I have left there she has been on my mind and I wonder how she is doing. 
 
Angela L. Beverly, Ronald McDonald House

Our group went to Catholic Charities and made pillows for the refugees.  We tore open cushions, throw pillows, etc. and used the stuffing to make bed pillows.  I hadn't used a sewing machine for 30 years and I sewed the ends of the bed pillows together so the stuffing didn't fall out.  We talked, laughed and bonded.  It was uplifting to give to others.
 
Becky Wenning, Catholic Charities

I went to Dare to Care to participate in the orientation service project. Everyone worked very hard -- not a slacker in the bunch.
 
There were large empty bins grouped roughly in a square.  In the center of this were many boxes containing assorted food items.  Our job was to empty the boxes and sort the food into the large bins, which were labeled for specific items, such as "cereal," "coffee/tea," "canned beans," "side dishes," etc.
 
After about an hour and a half, the foreman sent us on break.  They had a table large enough to seat all of us.  They provided bottles of cold water.  It was nice to sit for a few minutes and get to know the people around me.  There really was no time for chatter while we were working.
 
When we came back, the foreman asked if we were there until noon.  After some hesitation, someone spoke up and said our assignment was until 11:30 but that most of us could probably stay until noon if needed.  After the break, the work seemed to go much more smoothly.  We had the hang of it, and quickly finished sorting the rest of the food.  We then prepped the empty boxes for the next team of volunteers.  We finished right around 11:30.
 
The foreman, Johnnie, thanked us for our hard work.  He said we had sorted 14,000 lbs of food!  The work was tiring, but very rewarding.  As we were leaving, one of the students said, "This might sound corny, but I just kept thinking, 'some hungry kid is going to get this food.'"
 
Johnnie told us even though he's in his 50's, he wants to go to law school.  He said he hopes to see us next year.  Come on, Johnnie!  We'll leave the light on.

Becky Wimberg, Dare to Care Food Bank

Judge-in-Residence

Justice Bill Cunningham will be the Law School's judge-in-residence on Monday, August 23.  Students, staff, and faculty are invited to attend a community-wide forum from 11:30 to 12:15 in room LL75.   Pizza will be provided.
  
Please join us in welcoming Justice Cunningham to the Law School and making the most of his visit.

Professor Marcosson Quoted in "Time" Magazine

Professor Marcosson was recently quoted in a Time magazine article, "Why California's Gay-Marriage Ban Was Upended" (August 5, 2010).

"The opinion is strong, first because it is carefully grounded in the factual record made by the parties," constitutional scholar Samuel Marcosson of the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law tells TIME. "Judge Walker used the combination of fundamental rights and equal-protection analysis. I don't think there is a better federal constitutional argument to be made. The question is whether we currently have a Supreme Court truly prepared to rule in favor of these arguments."

The article was written by Michael A. Lindenberger, a 2006 graduate of the University of Louisville's Louis D. Brandeis School of Law.

Notice of UofL's Smoke-Free Campus Policy

***Starting Tuesday, June 1, 2010, the designated smoking areas ceased to exist and the policy will be fully enforced on all campuses.

On November 19, 2009 the University of Louisville instituted a policy that prohibits smoking on all campuses.

There are many reasons why we've instituted this policy:

- Public health: Smoking harms both the smoker and people around the smoker.
- Employee satisfaction: More and more UofL employees are complaining about walking through smoke to enter buildings and about cigarette butt litter.
- Inequity: Many employees also have pointed out the inequity in having a smoking ban only on one campus.

Smoking is an individual choice. This, however, may be an opportunity for many of you who want to stop smoking. Both our Get Healthy Now employee health management initiative and our Campus Health Center can connect you with classes and products that can help you quit. Humana has made a generous offer to partially cover the costs of smoking cessation support, so we will offer an array of products, including pills, patches and gum, as well as behavioral support to people who want to quit. 

Shirley Willihnganz
University Provost