Student News

Academic Success Tip - Take Control of Your Studying Before Too Much Time Flies By

  • Designate one place in your apartment where you will have your law school study center.  Organize all of your casebooks, study aids, dictionaries, binders, notebooks, and other study materials in this one spot.  When you finish with a binder or casebook or stapler, return it to its place.  You will waste less time searching for your law school materials if you have one spot for everything.
  • Make a shopping list of what study materials you need and stock your apartment study center now.  Buy extra notepads, pens, ink cartridges, printer paper, paper clips, and other materials.  By anticipating your needs for the semester, you can avoid multiple or panicked trips to the office supply store later.  Also, you may be able to save money by buying bulk quantities instead of separate purchases of the items over time. 
  • Lay out everything you will need the next day before you go to bed.  It is easier to get organized while you can think calmly about the items you need for each class.  Grabbing up items as you rush out the door will likely lead to not having everything you need once you arrive at school.
  • Purchase a large dry erase board for your study center if you think it will help you.  Visual learners often benefit greatly from a dry erase board with multiple colors of markers.  Create flowcharts, IRAC outlines for practice question answers, or other information initially on a dry erase board.  You can add, delete, and modify until you are happy with the result.  Then, you can copy the final version on to the computer or paper.  Some students use the dry erase board for calendaring and listing “to do” items. 
  • Use monthly and weekly schedules and daily “to do” lists to organize yourself.  The monthly schedule can be used for deadlines and assigning daily tasks to meet the deadlines on time.  The weekly schedule can be used to design a study schedule that can be repeated most weeks to make certain you are getting all study tasks done each week.   “To do” lists can be used to prioritize the most important tasks each day.

Need MONEY for your organization

University of Louisville's CPC (Club Programming Committee) provides funding for student organizations' special events (i.e. guest speakers) that would not be possible without this financial assistance.  CPC requires a detailed budget of how the funding will be used.  

For guidelines and the application, please visit http://louisville.edu/dos/club-programming-committee.  Applications are due no later than 3:00 pm on August 27, 2010.  If you have any questions, please contact Stephanie Loper at stephanie.loper@yahoo.com.  

Annual BLSA Back to School Cookout

You're invited to the Annual Black Law Students Association Back to School Cookout!

Saturday August 14, 2010
12-5 PM
Thurman Hutchinson Park on River Road

RSVP to Courtney Phelps and indicate the number of guest coming.

Seminar on Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law (Levinson)

Seminar on Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law.   Professor Levinson will teach a seminar on “Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law” this spring if there is sufficient interest among students.  The prerequisite is either Employment Law or Labor Law, or under special circumstances, by permission of the instructor .  If you are interested, please contact Professor Levinson at a.levinson@louisville.edu or 502-852-0794.

Course Description

This course covers advanced issues in labor and employment law that are of interest to the enrolled students, who are welcome to suggest topics.  The course may deal with 1) issues of democracy and self-governance in the workplace, 2)  workplace privacy issues, 3)  the role of international law in resolving employment and labor disputes, 4) the intersection between labor and employment laws, 5) the rise of alternative dispute resolution, 6) alternative visions for a more meaningful system to resolve labor and employment disputes, 7) the intersection between labor and employment and environmental issues, 8) regulation of workplace bullying, 9) envisioning the rights of the disabled as civil rights, 10) issues of transgendered people in the workplace, 11) lifestyle discrimination 12) accommodating work family balance in the workplace, 13) employment issues raised by downsizing or bankruptcy, 14) the significance of certain rules of professional responsibility in an employment practice, or 15) assessing recently passed federal or state employment legislation and pending legislation.

In addition to learning about doctrinal and practical labor and employment law issues, the seminar addresses the process of writing and publishing a seminar paper.  Each student will write a seminar paper on an advanced labor or employment law issue.  The paper may satisfy writing the requirement.

Law Student Appointed to Council for Postsecondary Education

Governor Steve Beshear has appointed Aaron Price, 3L, to serve on the Council for Postsecondary Education, following his nomination by SGA President Sana Abhari. Student body presidents made four nominations to fill a vacant post; two of those went to Beshear for consideration. This appointment will allow Price to present a student voice on the many issues the CPE board handles. Price received his bachelor's degree from UofL and is enrolled in the Brandeis School of Law.

Full Story: Student Aaron Price appointed to Council for Postsecondary Education  (UofL Today, August 5, 2010)

 

Seminar on Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law (Levinson)

Seminar on Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law.   Professor Levinson will teach a seminar on “Advanced Issues in Labor and Employment Law” this spring if there is sufficient interest among students.  The prerequisite is either Employment Law or Labor Law, or by permission of the instructor under special circumstances.  If you are interested, please contact Professor Levinson at a.levinson@louisville.edu or 502-852-0794.

Course Description

This course covers advanced issues in labor and employment law that are of interest to the enrolled students, who are welcome to suggest topics.  The course may deal with 1) issues of democracy and self-governance in the workplace, 2)  workplace privacy issues, 3)  the role of international law in resolving employment and labor disputes, 4) the intersection between labor and employment laws, 5) the rise of alternative dispute resolution, 6) alternative visions for a more meaningful system to resolve labor and employment disputes, 7) the intersection between labor and employment and environmental issues, 8) regulation of workplace bullying, 9) envisioning the rights of the disabled as civil rights, 10) issues of transgendered people in the workplace, 11) lifestyle discrimination 12) accommodating work family balance in the workplace, 13) employment issues raised by downsizing or bankruptcy, 14) the significance of certain rules of professional responsibility in an employment practice, or 15) assessing recently passed federal or state employment legislation and pending legislation.

In addition to learning about doctrinal and practical labor and employment law issues, the seminar addresses the process of writing and publishing a seminar paper.  Each student will write a seminar paper on an advanced labor or employment law issue.  The paper may satisfy writing the requirement.  

Skills Requirement for All Students Entering in Fall 2009 or Thereafter

As previously announced, all students entering the Law School in fall 2009 or thereafter must complete one credit hour of a "skills" course or experience.  There is still time to adjust your fall schedule, if that seems appropriate.

ACS Weekly Bulletin

Announcing the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy's Weekly Bulletin (July 30, 2010): 

Table of Contents:
  • ACS News and National Events
  • ACSblog Highlights
  • Law and Policy News
  • Upcoming ACS Lawyer, Student Chapter Events
Other Events and Opportunities:
  • ACS Job Opportunities
  • Other Job Opportunities
  • Fellowships and Internships
News Highlights:
  • President Obama Criticizes Lack of Movement on Judicial Nominations.
  • Report: The Roberts Court is Most Conservative in "Living Memory."
  • WikiLeaks Fallout.
  • Recusal Standards for Justices.
  • Tobacco Companies Lose Appeal.
  • The ADA at 20.

Cambrian Law Review Is Soliciting Abstracts

The Cambrian Law Review at Aberystwyth University in the UK is publishing a 2012 Special Edition on Cultural Rights including but not limited to such keywords as cultural property, cultural heritage, indigenous peoples/rights and minority rights.

If interested, a 250 word abstract and paper title should be sent to Miss Shea Esterling by August 9, 2010 and the final paper of 6-8,000 words would need to be submitted no later than May 3, 2011. Notification of acceptance will be no later than October 1, 2010.

UofL Law Brandeis Book Exchange

All,

 

One of our own, Gavin Noffsinger, through the power of Facebook, has created a new way to sale and buy law school textbooks.  Frustrated by the local prices of law textbooks, Mr. Noffsinger created a Facebook group, UofL Law Brandeis Book Exchange, to help Brandeis law students sale and/or exchange their textbooks with other Brandeis law students.  I strongly encourage you to check out the group and determine for yourself whether it is something that will help alleviate the stress of purchasing textbooks.  On another note, I hope everyone is enjoying the end of summer break and I look forward to seeing you all very soon. 

 

Sincerely,

Daniel Cameron