Student News

ACS Immigration Event

The American Constitution Society is hosting an event on "Immigration Law and Kentucky Senate Bill 6" featuring Professor Trucious-Haynes at 12 noon on Thursday, February 3 in room 275.  Lunch will be provided.

Witnesses Needed for Trial Competition!

We need a minimum of thirty more witnesses for Rounds 1, 2, and 3 of the Region 7 National Trial Competition on Friday, February 18 and Saturday, February 19.  Can you help?

If you volunteer to be a witness, you will have a copy of your deposition emailed to you in advance.  The preparation to play the witness during the competition should not take longer than 1 hour.  You must simply review your deposition (4 to 9 pages, depending on the witness) and know the facts in your deposition.

If you can help, please complete the sign-up sheet attached.  If you have questions, please ask Brian Bennett or Kimberly Ballard.

The deadline to sign up to participate is FRIDAY, FEB 4.  This opportunity is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, 3Ls, and 4Ls.

*NOTE:  If you volunteer to play a witness role at the competition, you cannot also volunteer as a witness during the Law School's team practices before the competition.

 

Mandatory Bar Program for Students Graduating in December 2011, May 2012, or August 2012

On Tuesday, February 8, at 12:15 p.m, the Kentucky Office of Bar Admissions, with a member of the Character and Fitness Committee, will present a mandatory bar program for second year law students.  The Board of Bar Examiners’ Character and Fitness Committee must certify graduating law students before they are allowed to sit for the bar.  One fact the committee members look at closely is the applicant’s record of financial responsibility. 

Judge Gary Payne, Character and Fitness Committee member, and Bonnie Kittinger, Director and General Counsel, will discuss financial responsibility in the context of professionalism and a lawyer’s obligation to uphold the values of the profession.  Judge Payne will discuss how financial debt can evidence a lack of responsibility and further, how debt can lead to financial pressures and interfere with a lawyer’s duties to his or her clients. 

ABA Standard 302(a)(5) requires that each student receive substantial instruction in “the history, goals, structure, values, rules and responsibilities of the legal profession and its members.”  In addition, Interpretation 302-6 requires that the School of Law “involve members of the bench and bar in the instruction required by Standard 302(a)(5).”  This program is designed to provide instruction on professionalism issues concerning law students and lawyers and also to satisfy the ABA’s requirement in Standard 302(a)(5).

Attendance at the February 8 program is required for all students graduating at the times noted (primarily this is 2Ls).  Please mark your calendars now and plan to attend.  If you have an absolute conflict that will prohibit you from attending the February 8 program, you must notify Dean Bean, kathybean@louisville.edu, and provide documentation concerning your conflict. 

Questions?  Please email Kimberly Ballard at kimberly.ballard@louisville.edu.

Career Opportunities in Frankfort

Learn about the career paths that resulted in obtaining positions in Frankfort.  Ms. Lee Guice is the Director of Audits and Investigations with the Office of Inspector General.  Mr. Ryan Newcomb is an associate with Johnson, True & Guarnieri.  Ms. Ann Swain serves as Chief Staff Attorney for the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

The event begins at NOON, not 1:30 p.m. in room 175.  Pizza and drinks will be served prior to the event.

 

Black History Month Celebration

The LBA invites you to celebrate Black History Month at the Bar Center on Thursday, February 24.  This year's celebration will begin at 3:30 p.m. with a screening of the film "Uncommon Vision: The Life and Times of John Howard Griffin," followed by a Q&A session with critically acclaimed filmmaker, Morgan Atkinson.

The celebration continues at 5 p.m. with a reception and awards ceremony honoring the winners of Central High School's Justice William E. McAnulty Jr. Essay Contest and presentation of the LBA Diversity Scholarship and Justice William E. McAnulty Jr. Trailblazer Award.

Both the program and reception are free and open to the public. Click here for more information or contact Marisa Motley by calling (502) 583-5314 or email mmotley@loubar.org
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Weekly Academic Success Tip - Have YOU Started Outlining Yet?

When created correctly, an outline will become your primary, and possibly only, study aid for exams.  While law students create outlines in order to have an aid from which to study, it is through the process of creating an outline that you actually learn the law.  Because outlining is a process that continues throughout the year, you need to begin at some point during the first month of classes.  Why?  If you wait to work on your outlines until the end of the semester, it is unlikely that you will have enough time to complete them prior to exams. Listen to your professors and to your colleagues that received A’s and B’s last semester - start your outlines now!  Here are some tips to keep in mind as you work on your outlines for each course.

  • View your outline as your master document for studying.  Your notes and briefs go “on the shelf” once you have outlined a section.  Your casebook is no longer your focus for completed sections.
  • Make sure your outline takes a “top down” approach.  The outline should encompass the overview of the course rather than “everything said or read” during the semester.  Main essentials include:  rules, definitions of elements, hypos of when the rule/element is met and not met, policy, arguments that can be used, and/or reasoning that courts use. 
  • Cases are usually mere vehicles for information unless they are “big” cases.  Cases generally convey the main essentials that you need for your outline and are not the focus. 
  • Condense before you outline.  If you include “everything said or read” in your outline, you will need to condense in stages to get to the main essentials that you actually need for the exam.  If you condense before you outline a section, you will save time later.
  • Use visuals when appropriate.  If you learn visually, then avoid a thousand words by using a diagram, table, flowchart, or other visual presentation for the same information. 
  • Review your outline regularly.  You want to be learning your outline as well as writing it.  The world’s best outline will not help you if you do not have time to learn it before the exam.
  • Condense your outline to one piece of paper as a checklist.  A checklist includes only the topics and sub-topics.  Use acronyms tied to funny stories to help you remember the checklist.  Write the checklist on scrap paper once the exam begins.  For an open-book exam, the checklist should start your outline.
  • If you read and prepare for your classes one or two days in advance, your Thursdays and Fridays should be open to work on your outlines – no excuses!

Public Service Opportunity - More Witnesses Needed Feb 18 and Feb 19

Do you need to satisfy your law school public service hours?   Are you interested in mock trial and want to observe some of the best student trial advocates in our region?  Do you want to apply to be a member of the Moot Court Board?  If you answered "yes" to any of the above questions, please sign up to be a witness for the Region 7 National Trial Competition on Friday, February 18 and/or Saturday, February 19. 

If you volunteer to be a witness, you will have a copy of your deposition emailed to you in advance.  The preparation to play the witness during the competition should not take longer than 1 hour.  You must simply review your deposition (4 to 9 pages, depending on the witness) and know the facts in your deposition.

We need witnesses for the first three rounds of the competition.  See sign-up sheet attached.  If you have questions, please ask Brian Bennett or Kimberly Ballard.

The deadline to sign up to participate is FRIDAY, FEB 4.  This opportunity is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, 3Ls, and 4Ls.

*NOTE:  If you volunteer to play a witness role at the competition, you cannot also volunteer as a witness during the Law School's team practices before the competition.

 

Public Service Opportunity! Bailiffs needed for the National Trial Competition

The Moot Court Board is in need of several volunteer bailiffs for the National Trial Competition. Five bailiffs are needed for for Saturday the 19th. The hours of the competition are from 7:45am-5:30pm on the 19th.

1Ls interested in joining the Moot Court Board are highly encouraged to volunteer. This is a great opportunity to get a large chunk of your public service requirement fulfilled. Bailiff positions will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please email maosbo06@louisville.edu or marilynaosborn@gmail.com to sign up. 

Careers in Community Organizing for Social Justice

The Direct Action & Research Training (DART) Center will be on the U of L law campus on Monday, February 7 at 6:00pm in W303A in the Student Activities Center to discuss careers in the field of community organizing with students interested in empowering their communities and working for social change.

Please RSVP if you are interested by contacting Hannah Wittmer by calling 785.841.2680 with your name, phone #, email address and school.

After years of research into best practices, experimentation, evaluation, and refinement, the Organizers Institute has become THE elite field school in the training of grassroots community organizers in the country.

DART is now accepting applications for the 2011 DART Organizers Institute, the paid, four-month field school for people interested in launching a career in community organizing. Participants will undergo a combined classroom and field training covering such topics as:
  • Entering a community
  • Identifying and training local leaders
  • Strategic planning and issue cutting
  • Relationship and community building
  • Direct Action on community issues
  • Fundraising
The DART Center, has built coalitions throughout the country that have won important victories on a broad set of justice issues including:
  • Education reform in low-performing public schools
  • Job Training
  • Drugs and Violence
  • Criminal Recidivism
  • Living Wage
  • Neighborhood Revitalization
  • Predatory Lending
  • Affordable Housing, etc.
The DART Organizers Institute combines a 7-day classroom orientation with 15 weeks of infield training at a local grassroots organization and in-field training site.  Organizer Trainees are provided with a cost of living stipend and travel.  Room, board, and tuition will also be paid by DART during the seven-day classroom training.  After successful completion of the program, DART will place graduates into permanent full-time salaried positions earning $30,000-$35,000/year + benefits.  DART is a 501(c)(3) organization, therefore, employees of the DART Network are eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness under the recently enacted College Cost Reduction and Access Act.

The 7-day classroom orientation and 15-week infield training start in July 2011. Training locations will include placements in several states around the country.

Although it may be helpful, no direct experience is necessary. Organizer Trainees (OTs) hired to participate in the DART Organizers Institute must demonstrate a desire to pursue community organizing as a long-term professional career. A master's degree, JD, or similar life experience is preferred though not necessary. Candidates must have a college degree or be graduating prior to July 2011. Also, candidates must display a workmanlike diligence, be driven to produce sustained results, have proven capacity to build relationships of trust, create and execute a plan, act professionally, feel comfortable working with religious institutions, be accountable and willing to hold others accountable, demonstrate disciplined thought and action, and work in a team setting.  OTs must also have access to a car during their training and be flexible regarding relocation. Fluency in Spanish/English is a plus and people of color are encouraged to apply.

Low-moderate income communities across the country are feeling the bite of the recession that began in December 2007. Cutbacks in human services and education, layoffs and persistent unemployment, home foreclosures, increased youth violence, predatory lending, and other serious issues are day-to-day realities for many. Now is the time for a new generation of community organizers to step up, unite people, and transform our communities. DART is recruiting and training that new generation.

To find out more about DART or to apply, we encourage you to contact Hannah Wittmer at  (785) 841-2680. You can download applications or view profiles from previous OTs at the DART website.  

SBA January Student of the Month

Congratulations to Seth Slone, January's Student of the Month.  Seth was
nominated by his peers and selected by the Student Bar Association to be
recognized for his contributions as a proactive member of the Law
School. 

 If you would like to nominate a student for Student of the
Month, you can submit a nomination at
http://www.law.louisville.edu/students/sba/forms/student-of-the-month.

Congratulations again to Seth. You will find gifts from the Student Bar
Association in your student mailbox and you will be featured on the
Student Bar Association's board in the lower level of the Law School.