Student News

Good Luck to Securites Law Moot Court Team

The Moot Court Board wishes luck to Jennifer Tarrance and David Ward who will be competing in the Irving R. Kaufman Memorial Moot Court Competition this weekend.  The Competition focuses on securities law issues and is held in New York.  The team is coached by Professor Manning Warren.

Trademark Moot Court Team Competes in National Finals

Congratulations to the Trademark Moot Court Team consisting of Mari-Elise Gates, Marilyn Osborn, and Justin Capps!  After winning regionals last month, the team competed at nationals during spring break and won 2nd place for Best Brief, beating out California-Berkley and Creighton. Out of 89 teams, UofL finished 3rd overall. The team was coached by Jack Wheat of Stites and Harbison.

1L Spring Break Challenge Champion Crowned - Julie Simonson

Please join the faculty, staff, and administration in congratulating the Champion of the inaugural Spring Break Challenge - Julie Simonson.  Ms. Simonson is a first-year student in Section One.  She took the Challenge on March 23, and answered the most Contracts questions correctly under timed conditions.  As Champion, Ms. Simonson will receive a $300 certificate for a Kaplan PMBR Bar Review Course, 3,200 Lexis Rewards points, and a Lexis Finals Survival Kit.  Congratulations are also extended to Lani Burt, runner-up, and third-place finishers Amanda Anderson and Nancy Vinsel.  The Champion, runner-up, and third-place finishers are all from Section One!  Congratulations and excellent work!

OYEZ, OYEZ, OYEZ! The Kentucky Court of Appeals is Now in Session

Honorable Judges Combs, Clayton, Stumbo, Taylor, and VanMeter presiding.  Hosted by the University of Louisville School of Law March 23-24, 2010, in the Allen Courtroom.

The complete docket, along with bios can be found here.

 

 

The law school would like to thank the Kentucky Court of Appeals judges who attended a Q&A session with students on the second day of their appellate proceedings.

As noted by moot court board president Barry Dunn, the Q&A conveniently preceded this weekend's first-year oral advocay competition begins on Saturday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Moot Court Board President Barry Dunn introduces the panel.

 

Appellate judges field questions.

(From left to right, Judge Laurence VanMeter, Judge Jeff Taylor and Judge Janet Stumbo.)

 

Students enjoyed the opportunity to ask Kentucky Court of Appeals Judges about the appellate process.

 

SBA Elections Interest Sessions: Mandatory

If you are interested in/planning on running for any position on SBA for the 2010-2011 school year, you must come to one interest meeting today (unless you have already attended one on either Monday or Tuesday). The two time choices are 12-12:15 and 5-5:15. Both will be held in the SBA Office, room 245. If you any questions, please contact Luke Vance at lavanc02@louisville.edu.

2010-11 Moot Court Board Officers

The Moot Court Board is proud to announce that the following individuals were elected officers for the 2010-11 academic year:

Marilyn Osborn, President 

Brian Bennett, Vice President for Administration 

Jennifer Monarch, Vice President for External Relations

Ben Basil, Vice President for Internal Affairs

Roz Cordini, Vice President for Public Relations

The Moot Court Board is responsible for organizing and administering all the Law School's moot court activities of the Law School. The school competed in eighteen external competitions during the 2009-10 academic year and held two internal competitions, Pirtle-Washer and the First-Year Oral Advocacy Competition.

Good Luck to International Commercial Arbitration Team

The Moot Court Board would like to wish Andrea Fagan and Elisabeth Luff continued success as they compete in the International Commercial Arbitration Competition in Vienna beginning this weekend.  The team is coached by Robert Brown.

Urgent Message for Graduating 3Ls and 4Ls

If you have not ordered your graduation apparel, then please do so soon.  March 31st is the deadline to order apparel.  The information for the speaker at graduation should be out either this week or next week.  If you have not already, please sign up for the "SBA for 3Ls" TWEN page.  Your SBA 3L Reps will correspond to you through that medium.

Patent Law Moot Court Team Reaches Semi-finals

The Moot Court program's 2009-10 success continued last weekend as our Patent Law team made the regional semi-finals of the Giles Sutherland Rich Memorial Moot Court Competition.  The competition was held in Houston, Texas, at the Federal Courthouse for the Eastern District of Texas and marked the first time that UofL had competed in the competition.  Eighteen teams participated.

Team member Dave Kincaid argued all issues by himself for the team after teammate Mari-Elise Gates, who was on brief with Kincaid, could not attend due to the Trademark Moot Court Competition finals.  Kincaid was the only student at the competition forced to argue by himself. 

Kincaid defeated three teams, including the University of Houston, Loyola (Los Angeles), and South Texas, before succumbing to the University of Tennessee in the semi-finals.  Along the way, judges complemented Dave on his professional demeanor and presentation skills and particularly liked his ability to complete a running rebuttal when arguing as appellee.

The Patent Law team is coached by Professor John Cross.  Special thanks goes to Dr. Bruce Stuckman, an alumnus of the law school, for his generous financial support.

 

Weekly Academic Success Tip - Think About Your Review Process in Preparation for Finals

Some of you have been studying for exams all semester by staying on top of your course reading, adding to your outlines each week, and conscientiously learning new material while reviewing past material.  This ongoing process is the key to the highest grades because deeper understanding and long-term memory result.

As you study for exams, consider the four kinds of review that you should include in your study plans.  If you incorporate all four types, you are more likely to master your courses and garner better grades.

Intense Learning.  First, you need to learn intensely each topic.  This type of study has deep understanding as its goal.  It may take several study sessions to reach this level of learning for a long topic that was covered over multiple class sessions.  Intense learning may need to include additional reading in study aids or time asking the professor questions in order to clear up all confusion and master the material.  In addition to learning this one part of the course, the student should consider how it relates to the course as a whole. 

Fresh Review.  Second, you should strive to keep fresh everything in the course.  This type of study is focused on reading your outline cover to cover at least once a week.  It makes sure that the law student never gets so far away from a topic that it gets "foggy."  Students forget 80% of what they learn within two weeks if they do not review regularly.  After intensely learning a topic, it would be a shame to forget it.  Constant review reinforces long-term memory and provides for quicker recall when the material is needed.

Memory Drills.  Third, you should spend time on basic memory drills.  This type of study helps a student remember the precise rule, the definition of an element, or the steps of analysis.  For most students, these drills will be done with homemade flashcards.  Some students will write out rules multiple times.  Other students will develop mnemonics.  Still others may have visual reminders.  The grunt work of memory can be tedious.  However, if you do not know the law well, you will not do well on the exam.

Practice Questions.  Fourth, you must complete as many practice questions as possible.  This step has several advantages.  It monitors whether you really understand the law.  It tests whether you can apply the law to new fact scenarios.  It allows you to practice test-taking strategies.  And it monitors whether you need to repeat intense learning on a topic or sub-topic because errors on the questions indicate that it was obviously not learned to the level needed.

Ideally, you should set aside blocks of study time to accomplish each of these reviews every week for every course.  The proportion of time for each course will depend on the amount of material covered, the difficulty of the course, and the type of exam.