American Constitution Society News

Do Felon Voter Disenfranchisement Laws Weaken Our Democracy?

 

Felony disenfranchisement takes away the ability to vote for more than five million Americans. While the majority of states prohibit currently-incarcerated felons and those on probation from voting, most states remove restrictions on the ability of felons to vote after they have completed serving their sentence.  

In 2011, however, executive action by the governors of Iowa and Illinois effectively reinstituted permanent disenfranchisement policies, joining Virginia and Kentucky in permanently disenfranchising felons. What rationale supports requiring felons to “earn” the right the vote after having completed their sentences? What links does felony enfranchisement have with efforts to combat recidivism? Is there significance in the disproportionate impact felony disenfranchisement laws have on the African American community?

Join ACS, BLSA, and Professor Cedric Powell this Tuesday, October 16, at noon, to discuss these issues and how they laws impact Kentucky and democracy as a whole.  Free pizza from Papalinos. 

Did you know Kentucky is one of the few states that permanently bars felons from voting?

Here is why you should care: Voting is a fundamental right and a cornerstone of democracy. Kentucky is one of the few states in the country that permanently disenfranchises all individuals with felony convictions, barring over 180,000 individuals from voting—two-thirds of whom have fully served their sentence. One in every 17 adults is ineligible to vote. The rate of disenfranchisement among African Americans in Kentucky is the nation’s second highest. One in four African American adults is barred from voting, leaving many communities with severely limited political power. Professor Cedric Powell, a leading scholar on the law and race, will speak on this topic Tuesday, October 16, at noon in Room 175. Lunch will be served. 

Kentucky Supreme Court Judicial Candidate Forum Has Been Canceled

Due to unforseen events, this event has been cancelled Kentucky Supreme Court Judicial Candidate Forum scheduled for 10/11 has been canceled. Please consult the events calendar and the Student Organization News and Events email for upcoming ACS programs. 

Kentucky Supreme Court Judicial Candidate Forum

Want to find out where the candidates for Kentucky Supreme Court stand on the issues? Join ACS and the two judicial candidates running for election to the Kentucky Supreme Court for a discussion regarding issues before the bench and the role of the judiciary. Incumbent Justice Will T. Scott is being challenged for his 7th District seat by Judge Janet Stumbo, Kentucky Court of Appeals 7th Appellate District. The event will be moderated by Brandeis School of Law Professor Luke Milligan and will include a question and answer session from the audience. Thursday, October 11, 12:00, Room 275. Lunch will catered by Schlotzky's Deli, bring your own drink. 

Kentucky Supreme Court Judicial Candidate Forum

Want to find out where the candidates for Kentucky Supreme Court stand on the issues? The two candidates running for election to the Kentucky Supreme Court 7th District will convene at Brandeis School of Law for a discussion regarding issues before the bench and the role of the judiciary. Incumbent Judge Judge Will T. Scott is being challenged for his 7th Supreme Court District seat by Judge Janet Stumbo, Kentucky Court of Appeals 7th Appellate District and a former Kentucky Supreme Court justice. The event will be moderated by Brandeis School of Law Professor Luke Milligan. This Thursday, October 11, 12:00, Room 275. Lunch will catered by Schlotzky's Deli. 

Scott

Arizona v. The United States: What Happened and What Difference Will it Make?

We all know that the Supreme Court ruled on Arizona's controversial immigration law SB 1070 this June, but what did the opinion really mean? 

Join ACS and Brandeis School of Law's Professor Enid Trucios-Haynes, a nationally recognized scholar in immigration law, to discuss the Supreme Court's ruling and to make sense of what it all means. Speaking points will include:

  • How does the ruling fit the Court's jurisprudence regarding the role of states and municipalities enforcing federal immigration law? 
  • Was the Court's finding three of the four provisions pre-empted while leaving the most controversial provision intact a victory or a loss for immigrants' rights?
  • How will the Court's decision effect future as-applied challenges to the law?

Today, October 4, 12:00, Room 175. Free Qdoba Hot Naked Burrito Bar (yes that's what it's really called)

Arizona v. The United States: What Happened and What Difference Will it Make?

We all know that the Supreme Court ruled on Arizona's controversial immigration law SB 1070 this June, but what did the opinion really mean? 

Join ACS and Brandeis School of Law's Professor Enid Trucios-Haynes, a nationally recognized scholar in immigration law, to discuss the Supreme Court's ruling and to make sense of what it all means. Speaking points will include:

  • How does the ruling fit the Court's jurisprudence regarding the role of states and municipalities enforcing federal immigration law? 
  • Was the Court's finding three of the four provisions pre-empted while leaving the most controversial provision intact a victory or a loss for immigrants' rights?
  • How will the Court's decision effect future as-applied challenges to the law?

Thursday, October 4, 12:00, Room 175. Free Qdoba!

Celebrate 2012 Louisville Craft Beer Week at the ACS/ELLUS Happy Hour

 

Come celebrate the annual Louisville Craft Beer Week with members of the American Constitution Society and the Environmental Law & Land Use Society at Against the Grain Brewery and Smokehouse located at 401 E Main St, Louisville, KY 40202 (in the bottom of Slugger Field), tonight at 5:30 p.m. Louisville Craft Beer Week promotes the region’s thriving craft beer culture, enhancing beer knowledge and appreciation through a 9 day (two weekend) festival that attracts beer tourism, fosters knowledge of our regional brewing heritage, and serves as a showcase for the Louisville area’s breweries, restaurants, pubs, caterers, retailers, entertainers, and other businesses with ties to the craft beer community.

 

 

Arizona v. The United States: What Happened and What Difference Will it Make?

Join ACS and Brandeis School of Law's Professor Enid Trucios-Haynes, a nationally recognized scholar in immigration law, to discuss the Supreme Court's recent ruling on the constitutionality of the Arizona's immigration law, SB 1070. Speaking points will include:

  • How the ruling fits the Court's jurisprudence regarding the role of states and municipalities enforcing federal immigration law. 
  • Was the Court's finding three of the four provisions pre-empted while leaving the most controversial provision intact a victory or a loss for immigrants' rights?
  • How the Court's decision will effect future as-applied challenges to the law.
October 4, 2012, 12:00 - 1:00. Room 175. Lunch will be served. 

ACS New Member Interest Meeting

Are you interested in becoming part of the next generation of progressive lawyers, judges, policy experts, legislators and academics?

Do hold a progressive vision of core constitutional values such as genuine equality, liberty, justice and the rule of law?

Do you believe that the law should be a force to improve the lives of all people?

The American Constitution Society wants you! Join us for our new interest meeting today, 8/28 at 1:00 pm, in room LL75. Free Papalinos pizza will be served. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/ACS-University-of-Louisville-Student-Chapter/436190746419568